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If I can take Latin alongside Spanish, would it help in college or be a waste of time?
 

DASicari

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I took Latin I and II in high school and I have not found it helpful, at least for retail pharmacy practice.

It isn't too difficult to remember what the SIG codes mean after some decent expose to them.
 

AKN16

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I took four years of Latin in high school and I haven't really used any of it..

All I know that applies to pharmacy is that RX= take this. But, AU in Latin means "Gold", but in the pharmacy/medical world it means "both ears."
 

Passion4Sci

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I thought AU was the abbreviation on the periodic table, but the word for gold in Latin is "aurum"?

Additionally, while I am sure it'll always be contested, I was under the impression that "Rx" is actually the Eye of Horus,



Then there is the whole Rx = recipere thing, or the "take this" thing.

I personally like the Eye of Horus, but I dunno if we'll ever know conclusively. Sad, isn't it =/
 

OTFuturePharmD

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The only place I have seen Latin to be very useful is in reading medical charts. Lots of lovely medical terms with latin root words. If you know the roots, you will know what the medical term is.
 

Hels2007

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Yep, I found Latin helpful for anatomy, because when I would forget what a particular word meant, I could analyze the roots and logically deduce what it could or couldn't be on the multiple-choice exam.

And overall, because almost all of English medical terminology is based on either Greek or Latin, it is helpful... but I simply like langauges.
 

confettiflyer

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it's helpful, but won't make or break your career...it's gotten me random extra credit answers or helped in those pesky medical terminology quizzes we got now and again.

If anything, it makes you feel smart when you write down "nil per os" and not "nothing by mouth" when you see an extra credit question asking for it. hahaha
 

IrishRxMan

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Regardless of if it will help you in pharmacy school specifically, knowing Latin will help you to have a better grasp on English and romance languages. Spanish is becoming a language that is spoken in more places in this country, so anything to help learn it better is a bonus.
 

confettiflyer

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I agree, Spanish is a "two birds one stone" deal in that you can communicate with a large/fast growing pt set AND it's more rooted in latin (ex. the word for pain in latin and spanish is dolor) than English (which is Germanic).
 
OP
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Thanks guys for posting, I really appreciate it! I'm already pretty much fluent in Spanish. I can understand roughly 95% of spoken Spanish and read a ton of books so nearly all written. I'll take a few Latin classes, hopefully they'll help me get an even stronger grasp on it!

Little off topic, but assuming I spend a summer in a Spanish speaking country to perfect my skills, would being fluent in Spanish help me at all with admissions?
 

confettiflyer

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Little off topic, but assuming I spend a summer in a Spanish speaking country to perfect my skills, would being fluent in Spanish help me at all with admissions?
Knowledge of a second language is definitely a plus. It's funny, my friend in HR who does hiring turned down an applicant and got a nasty letter back how he was disappointed that the job listed "bilingual" as a preferred skill and how it was racist/discriminatory/etc... What an a-hole.

It's a nice bump in admissions, but it will REALLY come in handy when you're job hunting.
 
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Hels2007

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I personally always give bonus points to people who speak three or more languages when evaluating applications. My personal fudge factor. :D
 

DoctorRx1986

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Latin may be helpful to an extent like others have said, but it is not absolutely essential to the study of pharmacy. I'm trilingual and would definitely go for Spanish. I speak, read, and write in Spanish and Italian and this knowledge does wonders for me and will do the same for you in the world of pharmacy. You will definitely have an edge over most other people if you know two or three languages...the more, the better. When I worked in retail, the pharmacist did not know any Spanish and I had to translate the conversations between him and the patient. Same thing happened to me when another patient did not know a lick of English...she spoke Italian and once again, I had to translate. You'll be more impressive. :thumbup:
 
OP
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Thanks guys, I really appreciate all the replies! How much of a bump in admissions would knowing Spanish be?
 

Passion4Sci

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Thanks guys, I really appreciate all the replies! How much of a bump in admissions would knowing Spanish be?
Admissions, not much.

Employment, in most areas, it'd be a huge selling point.

My knowledge of Farsi, Arabic and to a lesser extent Spanish has been really, really useful for me especially in the hospital. Being able to counsel in smoking cessation groups in different languages, etc, is invaluable to any hospital team.
 

Hels2007

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how's two and a half? my japanese isn't so hot, i'll work on that :idea:
Depends on the languages... and on the level of knowledge. Some people will put down "fluent" when they can barely say a couple phrases while others would count a language in which they can discuss pretty much any everyday topic but not science/law as only a half.
 

alenadoma

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Knowing a second, or third, or fourth language really gives you an upperhand in employement especially.
I was told recently that I was hired at my new job just because I know Russian (that particular Pharmacy has a huge number of Russian patients).
 

IrishRxMan

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I wouldn't worry about the Latin part...you will pick up the sig codes with no problem
What does knowing Latin have anything to do with sig codes?
 

Passion4Sci

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What does knowing Latin have anything to do with sig codes?
Stuff like prn, which we know as "as needed", but which comes from the Latin meaning "when necessary" or "the occasion has risen." pro re nata

While not SPECIFICALLY useful, it can help to understand the etymology of the words/abbreviations we use often.

Another good example is tussis, the Latin word for "cough." You can remember that and it'll help you remember tussin, antitussive vs. expectorant, etc.
 

IrishRxMan

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Stuff like prn, which we know as "as needed", but which comes from the Latin meaning "when necessary" or "the occasion has risen." pro re nata

While not SPECIFICALLY useful, it can help to understand the etymology of the words/abbreviations we use often.

Another good example is tussis, the Latin word for "cough." You can remember that and it'll help you remember tussin, antitussive vs. expectorant, etc.
I have gone through two years of pharmacy school and they have never covered the meaning of most sig codes. While I am not impugning any curriculum, it is simply not covered at my school. It isn't necessary as most people probably won't know, even doctors, where things like "prn" come from. While I admit it is a cool piece of info to possess, it doesn't make a bit of difference in how well you do in pharmacy school. PRN is a very common usage acronym and will be explained in the first year most likely if someone hasn't explained it prior to that. As for understanding the English language and medical terminology, both Latin and Greek are helpful as most conditions/terminology are based of of one or both. I took a semester of Latin and after I graduate I will continue to study the language but only because I have a love of things antiquated. I am a Mason, as my avitar depicts, and there are many things that are in Latin in Masonic books/teachings that I want to be able to read in their un-adultrated form.

It totally depends on your area of the country as to which second language other than English you will use the most. Spanish is rapidly becoming the dominant second language throughout the entire country but in small regional pockets other languages are useful as well. Latin, however, is a dead language. It will help you to understand the other romance languages as well as English as it is a mix of romance and germanic. The only people you can speak Latin to are old school Catholic priests/monks and classics enthusiasts. Outside of that, it's just something to impress folk with at a party, depending on the crowd.
 

Passion4Sci

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Fair enough Lawman, I was just answering why having a familiarity with Latin can be useful in signa codes, which is what you asked. =]
 

gll8889

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I took Latin, but I don't think it has had any beneficial impact on my pharmacy schooling. Probably not necessary, although I did find it interesting.