Jun 26, 2013
11
0
Status
Pre-Medical
Hey all,

I'm just about to finish my first semester at a DO school. Throughout the entire year I have had serious doubts about my path. I feel like my heart isnt in medicine, or in helping people. I wanted to go to med school for the money, respect, and job security. I value time with my family and fiance more than I would value the salary I'd earn as a future physician. I feel like I dont care about the medical field enough to make the sacrifices I'd need to make in order to become successful in the field. That said, I have been strongly considering taking an LOA and pursuing an MBA in finance, which is something that really interests me. However, my family thinks I will be throwing my life away. And considering I am already 26 with only a degree in Biology, its hard to state my argument against theirs. So, I'm here to ask you guys for your perspective on my situation and if there are many doors to non-clinical jobs that get opened with a DO degree without doing a residency.

Thanks all,

Happy holidays.
 

punkedoutriffs

7+ Year Member
Mar 28, 2010
1,028
122
Status
Medical Student
Hey all,

I'm just about to finish my first semester at a DO school. Throughout the entire year I have had serious doubts about my path. I feel like my heart isnt in medicine, or in helping people. I wanted to go to med school for the money, respect, and job security. I value time with my family and fiance more than I would value the salary I'd earn as a future physician. I feel like I dont care about the medical field enough to make the sacrifices I'd need to make in order to become successful in the field. That said, I have been strongly considering taking an LOA and pursuing an MBA in finance, which is something that really interests me. However, my family thinks I will be throwing my life away. And considering I am already 26 with only a degree in Biology, its hard to state my argument against theirs. So, I'm here to ask you guys for your perspective on my situation and if there are many doors to non-clinical jobs that get opened with a DO degree without doing a residency.

Thanks all,

Happy holidays.
I'm just an M1 but I say stick with it. You say you got into medicine for "money, respect, and job security?" So did the majority of people, whether they want to admit it or not. And you haven't even experienced clinical medicine yet. You just very well might like it. Plus, MBAs are REALLY struggling in the job market, so I would HIGHLY dissuade you from pursuing that path unless you can get into a TOP program or already have a job lined up that simply requires you to get the degree.
 

Porfirio

7+ Year Member
May 27, 2011
388
154
Status
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If I were in your shoes, I would get my DO degree - apply for residency placement (internal med or another residency that is 3 years long), and apply for a top B-school at the same time.

If I got the B-school, I would go there over residency.

If I did not get the B-school, I would go to the residency program and complete that. Once done with residency, I would take less hours. There is nothing saying you have to work 40+ hours a week as a physician. Yes, you will make less money, but why do you care since you value free time with family over money. If you are happy with this lifestyle, stick with it. If you are not happy being a practicing physician, continue to work on getting into a top B-school while you are working less than 40 hours a week as a physician. 26 now, so what 29 or 30 when you finish Med School, 32 or 33 when you finish residency, and 35 or 36 when you finish from a top B-school? Medicine needs people with MBAs in finance, and a DO with a MBA is a very good fit for that sector.
 

sidefx

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Oct 17, 2012
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I'd finish your med school and perhaps consider the MBA afterwards, then you'd be a prime candidate to get into the administrative side of medicine / managing hospitals etc. Lots of money to be had, and basically office hours.
 

sobored

5+ Year Member
Feb 18, 2013
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I disagree with the above posters. If you could be at peace that you made the right decision (unequivocally) by dropping out, then now is the perfect time to do it. You are barely scratching the surface, so there's not much to lose right now. It gets much worse...it's also not worth being miserable for ~7 years. Sometimes you just gotta do what's right for you.

And regarding opportunities outside of medicine with your degree, I'm not an expert but for pharma jobs and consulting gigs I think you at least need to get past your intern year and take Step 3 before they would consider hiring you. Again, this is just what I've heard before so take that with a grain of salt. I also imagine the degree could be useful in business somehow, but other posters may have more insight into that.
 
Oct 29, 2013
18
5
Status
Medical Student
Hey all,

I'm just about to finish my first semester at a DO school. Throughout the entire year I have had serious doubts about my path. I feel like my heart isnt in medicine, or in helping people. I wanted to go to med school for the money, respect, and job security. I value time with my family and fiance more than I would value the salary I'd earn as a future physician. I feel like I dont care about the medical field enough to make the sacrifices I'd need to make in order to become successful in the field. That said, I have been strongly considering taking an LOA and pursuing an MBA in finance, which is something that really interests me. However, my family thinks I will be throwing my life away. And considering I am already 26 with only a degree in Biology, its hard to state my argument against theirs. So, I'm here to ask you guys for your perspective on my situation and if there are many doors to non-clinical jobs that get opened with a DO degree without doing a residency.

Thanks all,

Happy holidays.
Do what you feel like will make you happy, not what others are pressuring you in to. If you aren't interested in medicine, get out now before you rack up the loans and leave it to the people that want to do the job. I'm only an M2, but it seems pretty clear cut to me. You'll be doing yourself and the people who would potentially be your patients a favor. I know I wouldn't want to go see anyone who doesn't want to be a physician when I'm having a problem.
 

Brain Bucket

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May 7, 2013
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I agree with the first three responses. They cover almost everything I would have said.
 
Last edited:
May 23, 2012
359
118
In the mountains
Status
Medical Student
Do what you feel like will make you happy, not what others are pressuring you in to. If you aren't interested in medicine, get out now before you rack up the loans and leave it to the people that want to do the job. I'm only an M2, but it seems pretty clear cut to me. You'll be doing yourself and the people who would potentially be your patients a favor. I know I wouldn't want to go see anyone who doesn't want to be a physician when I'm having a problem.
This is terrible advice in my opinion. OP, it seems pretty clear that you don't know what exactly you want, what will make you happy or what exactly you're interested in. The first 2 years suck (I'm m2) and we don't even know what medicine is like yet. You've probably never experienced much business education or had much of any career (you're 26 and have a biology degree) so how can you know what finance is like? You seem to be a bit lost and I think making a drastic decision like leaving medicine is one of the worst things you can do. Could you minimize your debt? Sure, but at what expense. MBA programs have a decent price tag and what if you don't like it? What if you can't find a good job with it? What if you decide you made a huge mistake leaving medicine? Have you tried looking into if your school has a combined MD/MBA program (I think most do). I would say you'd be better off sticking with med school, doing whatever you have to to pass and use your free time (yes you can have a ton of free time in m1/m2) to pursue your other interests in life (like learning finance on your own and managing your own investments etc.). I would really think hard about that salary and job security you mentioned. The grass is rarely ever greener.
 
Oct 29, 2013
18
5
Status
Medical Student
This is terrible advice in my opinion. OP, it seems pretty clear that you don't know what exactly you want, what will make you happy or what exactly you're interested in. The first 2 years suck (I'm m2) and we don't even know what medicine is like yet. You've probably never experienced much business education or had much of any career (you're 26 and have a biology degree) so how can you know what finance is like? You seem to be a bit lost and I think making a drastic decision like leaving medicine is one of the worst things you can do. Could you minimize your debt? Sure, but at what expense. MBA programs have a decent price tag and what if you don't like it? What if you can't find a good job with it? What if you decide you made a huge mistake leaving medicine? Have you tried looking into if your school has a combined MD/MBA program (I think most do). I would say you'd be better off sticking with med school, doing whatever you have to to pass and use your free time (yes you can have a ton of free time in m1/m2) to pursue your other interests in life (like learning finance on your own and managing your own investments etc.). I would really think hard about that salary and job security you mentioned. The grass is rarely ever greener.
While it may seem like the OP may not know what they want to do exactly, it was pretty obvious in their opening statement that it wasn't medicine. Job security and salary are not the main reason to get into medicine. I'm surprised that others haven't spoken up on the issue about someone claiming they aren't into medicine or helping people, yet others are trying to encourage this person to continue on in medicine. I know there is a physician shortage, but this is not the type of person we want filling the void (no offense OP). Granted, I'm not delusional enough to think that salary and job security didn't weigh into my decision at all, but if I wasn't interested in medicine or helping people, this would be a terrible idea from a personal satisfaction perspective and from the perspective of what patients deserve out of their providers.
 

Sephiroth

One-winged Angel
Oct 15, 2011
964
51
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Medical Student
This is terrible advice in my opinion. OP, it seems pretty clear that you don't know what exactly you want, what will make you happy or what exactly you're interested in. The first 2 years suck (I'm m2) and we don't even know what medicine is like yet. You've probably never experienced much business education or had much of any career (you're 26 and have a biology degree) so how can you know what finance is like? You seem to be a bit lost and I think making a drastic decision like leaving medicine is one of the worst things you can do. Could you minimize your debt? Sure, but at what expense. MBA programs have a decent price tag and what if you don't like it? What if you can't find a good job with it? What if you decide you made a huge mistake leaving medicine? Have you tried looking into if your school has a combined MD/MBA program (I think most do). I would say you'd be better off sticking with med school, doing whatever you have to to pass and use your free time (yes you can have a ton of free time in m1/m2) to pursue your other interests in life (like learning finance on your own and managing your own investments etc.). I would really think hard about that salary and job security you mentioned. The grass is rarely ever greener.
OP goes to a DO school, most of which are not part of a larger university, so there may not be that option with a business school. Also, jobs from MBAs, unlike medicine, are extremely prestige-oriented. If you don't have a solid business resume to land you a good job, getting an MBA in finance from a low-ranked school probably isn't going to get you great job prospects. Unless I were working for a company that just wanted me to have an MBA to move up the ladder (for instance, in finance from analyst to associate), then I doubt I'd spend two years and all that tuition on any MBA outside the top-10 business schools (or M7 if we wanna get fancy). And while I still do want to work in medicine, if for some reason down the road I wanted to leave the field, its seems a medical degree is something desirable. Granted, it's still meant to train you to be a physician, and I think sticking with that would be the preferred route if you could learn to like it.
 
OP
L
Jun 26, 2013
11
0
Status
Pre-Medical
Thanks for all the responses. It seems that the overwhelming consensus is that I grind out the rest of my 20s into a field I dont care for. It sounds like I'm obligated to continue, considering my back-up plan is so dependent on prestige and a solid business background, none of which I have. I hate having to come here and ask for advice, but its such a tough crossroads to be at that I really needed some advice from fellow med students. If I had a solid fall back plan if I were to drop out, I'd drop tomorrow. But the only thing keeping me in school is the fear of the unknown...not knowing what I'd do, how I would make money, how I could find a career.
 

Sephiroth

One-winged Angel
Oct 15, 2011
964
51
Status
Medical Student
Thanks for all the responses. It seems that the overwhelming consensus is that I grind out the rest of my 20s into a field I dont care for. It sounds like I'm obligated to continue, considering my back-up plan is so dependent on prestige and a solid business background, none of which I have. I hate having to come here and ask for advice, but its such a tough crossroads to be at that I really needed some advice from fellow med students. If I had a solid fall back plan if I were to drop out, I'd drop tomorrow. But the only thing keeping me in school is the fear of the unknown...not knowing what I'd do, how I would make money, how I could find a career.
Well one guy from my class left after realizing he didn't like clinical medicine the first semester. He had a BME degree and decided to pursue a career there, possibly getting an advanced degree. If you could see yourself being an engineer -maybe bio/biomdical since you're already more geared to that, you could go back to school and get an engineering degree and as long as you're not too picky, should be able to get a decent job.
 

ærospallo

or "ae" for short...
Nov 27, 2013
43
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30
Washington, D.C.
Status
Non-Student
I will definitely be following this thread, and I really hope the conversation continues. It's very interesting to me to see the line drawn among medical students, residents, and practitioners between the "practicality" (for lack of a better term) of being in medicine and the moral reasons that draw people to the field.

To the OP: It seems to me that you clearly fall on the side of the former. By your own admission, your "heart isn't in medicine, or in helping people," but to what extent? If you're currently in a DO school, you have, at the very least, proven you have the academic ability to succeed, but do you feel this lack of dedication could someday result in the neglegent care of a patient? And as you know, you've still got at least three more years of school, and so these feelings are only going to compound unless you find the motivation you need to change your outlook. I feel these are questions only you have the answer to, but I also ee the value of pouring these thoughts out on paper (albiet online, electronic paper) and hearing other people's opinions so that yours may come to light and/or be reaffirmed.

To change a single word in the above sentence: I feel these are the questions only you have to answer to. Now obviously you have another opinion to consider with your fiance, as whatever decision you make is going to severly effect her as well, but in the end it's your life (cliche, I know). Ten years from now, are you going to look back, regreting not taking the risk to follow the passion. It seems like you already know the answer.

To everyone else: Maybe a topic for another thread, but there is a clear duality between some of the responses here - those that tell the OP to stay in the program because of the effort already exerted, and those that want the OP to follow his passions, leaving the practice to those with their "hearts in it." I guess it boils down to the ethics behind the practice of medicine, and what motivates each individual to dedicate at least a portion of their life to it.

And if there was a thread started on this debate - if there are room for people in the field who aren't truly dedicated to it - it would at least be interesting to pull it back up in a few years after most of the people here have MDs and DOs and re-read our posts.



Oh, by the way...

Hi, SDN.
(first post)
 

Anastomoses

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If you had no interest in anything else, I'd say keep with medicine. Since you actually have some other interest, what in the world are you wasting time in medicine for? Get over there.

And hi Covert.
 
May 23, 2012
359
118
In the mountains
Status
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I will definitely be following this thread, and I really hope the conversation continues. It's very interesting to me to see the line drawn among medical students, residents, and practitioners between the "practicality" (for lack of a better term) of being in medicine and the moral reasons that draw people to the field.

To the OP: It seems to me that you clearly fall on the side of the former. By your own admission, your "heart isn't in medicine, or in helping people," but to what extent? If you're currently in a DO school, you have, at the very least, proven you have the academic ability to succeed, but do you feel this lack of dedication could someday result in the neglegent care of a patient? And as you know, you've still got at least three more years of school, and so these feelings are only going to compound unless you find the motivation you need to change your outlook. I feel these are questions only you have the answer to, but I also ee the value of pouring these thoughts out on paper (albiet online, electronic paper) and hearing other people's opinions so that yours may come to light and/or be reaffirmed.

To change a single word in the above sentence: I feel these are the questions only you have to answer to. Now obviously you have another opinion to consider with your fiance, as whatever decision you make is going to severly effect her as well, but in the end it's your life (cliche, I know). Ten years from now, are you going to look back, regreting not taking the risk to follow the passion. It seems like you already know the answer.

To everyone else: Maybe a topic for another thread, but there is a clear duality between some of the responses here - those that tell the OP to stay in the program because of the effort already exerted, and those that want the OP to follow his passions, leaving the practice to those with their "hearts in it." I guess it boils down to the ethics behind the practice of medicine, and what motivates each individual to dedicate at least a portion of their life to it.

And if there was a thread started on this debate - if there are room for people in the field who aren't truly dedicated to it - it would at least be interesting to pull it back up in a few years after most of the people here have MDs and DOs and re-read our posts.



Oh, by the way...

Hi, SDN.
(first post)
I agree that you should always follow your passion and what makes you happy but I just don't believe the OP (and I know I could be wrong) knows exactly what that passion is. You go through a 4 year biology degree and after one semester (not even) of med school, which we all know first year is an extension of undergrad, you want out because you're interested in business? Doesn't make sense to me (yes I know it could happen). Why didn't you dabble in business classes in undergrad? After a certain number of credit hours classes are free so you could have tried anything. It sounds more like you're a bit burned out and maybe have found yourself in a very stressful situation and you want out. Like I said before, you sound like you're lost in what you want to do for the rest of your life (very understandable). I say this because I've been there myself and I don't think it's a good time to make huge decisions.

But ****, do whatever you want.
 

theseeker4

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Apr 20, 2011
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If you had no interest in anything else, I'd say keep with medicine. Since you actually have some other interest, what in the world are you wasting time in medicine for? Get over there.

And hi Covert.
Agree with this entirely. Do NOT keep pursuing this, along with all the sacrifice and debt, unless you really want it. It is one thing to hate the pre clinical years, and power through them to get to clinical medicine on the other side. It is entirely different to have no real desire to be a clinician at all, and that means you should NOT push through this. Get out now while you can still afford to.

And for the record, I am not saying this because I am jaded or bitter; if I were starting over now I would still go to med school, but in my case I actually want to be a clinical physician. The OP obviously does not want to, and therefore there is no reason for them to go through this.
 
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evilbooyaa

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Going through 7+ years of school and residency while being miserable the whole time is not a good way to go through 7 years of your life.

You're just a MS1. If there was a time to drop out, now is the time. If you stick with it, you're going to completely hate your life for 7 years. If you leave to pursue business, one of two things will happen:

1) You continue with business, get a regular job, and never entertain the thought of medical school again

or

2) You realize that you don't necessarily 'like' business, but just that you really didn't like medical school. You then do something to continue living, be ther business or returning to medical school.

I personally feel like you're someobody in the 2nd group, but as I don't know you, I can't be confident. Decide which one of those two scenarios is more likely. Regardless, if you're not entertaining the idea of being a clinician (for any period of time) then I cannot recommend you to continue medical school. It's fine to have aspirations of going into administration, but (almost) all administrators started their careers by seeing patients in whatever they were boarded in.
 
OP
L
Jun 26, 2013
11
0
Status
Pre-Medical
I agree that you should always follow your passion and what makes you happy but I just don't believe the OP (and I know I could be wrong) knows exactly what that passion is. You go through a 4 year biology degree and after one semester (not even) of med school, which we all know first year is an extension of undergrad, you want out because you're interested in business? Doesn't make sense to me (yes I know it could happen). Why didn't you dabble in business classes in undergrad? After a certain number of credit hours classes are free so you could have tried anything. It sounds more like you're a bit burned out and maybe have found yourself in a very stressful situation and you want out. Like I said before, you sound like you're lost in what you want to do for the rest of your life (very understandable). I say this because I've been there myself and I don't think it's a good time to make huge decisions.

But ****, do whatever you want.

Actually you're right, I dont really know what my "passion" is. However, ever since I was a child I have always been interested aspects of finance like accounting and stock trading. I frequently find myself watching videos on balancing a financial spreadsheet when I should be studying for my cardio test. In college I was initially a business major but I switched to biology on a whim. My theory for why I went pre-med is that I come from a large family, many of which are in the medical field. I was always the shy kid who would go unnoticed, perhaps I went pre-med to get the attention and to make people proud. I dont know, its just a theory.
I frequently hear people say "only go into medical school if you cant see yourself doing anything else". Well I could see myself in a lot of professions. One of my biggest fears is staying in school and getting buried by debt to the point where I have no other choice but to trudge forward. Thanks again for all the words of wisdom, it is greatly appreciated. I've really been struggling through this physically and mentally. I've had to go see a doctor and get on some medication because I feel like I'm losing it. That said, I plan to use my upcoming Christmas break for some serious soul searching. Thanks again.
 

michaelrack

All In at the wrong time
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Dec 22, 2007
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Hey all,
I have been strongly considering taking an LOA and pursuing an MBA in finance, which is something that really interests me.
Can you take a LOA, and have the option of returning to med school? IF so, business school may be worth exploring
 

MSTPlease

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Oct 11, 2009
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For all the people saying get out now it's 7+ years, who says OP needs to do a residency? Why not go through med school setting yourself up for management/health care consulting and once you have the DO, drop off the clinical path and go into that. We got an email recently about this type of thing at my school: http://www.mckinsey.com/careers/create_your_path/career_pathways/career_pathways_advanced_degrees

This way we're only talking about 4 years - and I agree with the poster who thinks OP is just burning out a little.

If you can't stand moving forward at all thats one thing, but if you're only cause for concern is what are you gonna do after school since you don't want to be a full time clinician, spend some time exploring alternative paths before you make a huge decision like this.
 

circulus vitios

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What's the issue? Do you hate medicine altogether, or just clinical medicine? If it's the latter, why do you hate clinical medicine? If you can't stand clinical work, there is always radiology and pathology. Residency is going to suck, but you could probably get a 40-50 hour a week job in radiology or pathology if you don't mind the decrease in salary.
 
May 23, 2012
359
118
In the mountains
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http://www.nonclinicaljobs.com/

Check out this site, It's run by a physician and I believe it's legit.

Also, just wanted to say, so what if you're watching videos of finance when u should be studying cardio (u have cardio in your first semester?)Did you pass the exam? Because that's all that matters. I always watch videos of things I'd rather be doing than studying. Def look into if you can take a LOA.
 

Bacchus

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If I were in your shoes, I would get my DO degree - apply for residency placement (internal med or another residency that is 3 years long), and apply for a top B-school at the same time.

If I got the B-school, I would go there over residency.

If I did not get the B-school, I would go to the residency program and complete that. Once done with residency, I would take less hours. There is nothing saying you have to work 40+ hours a week as a physician. Yes, you will make less money, but why do you care since you value free time with family over money. If you are happy with this lifestyle, stick with it. If you are not happy being a practicing physician, continue to work on getting into a top B-school while you are working less than 40 hours a week as a physician. 26 now, so what 29 or 30 when you finish Med School, 32 or 33 when you finish residency, and 35 or 36 when you finish from a top B-school? Medicine needs people with MBAs in finance, and a DO with a MBA is a very good fit for that sector.
What happens if you match before you get the acceptance notice? Try saying "haha jay kay" to the program who just matched at.
 
Jun 1, 2013
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You are getting what we clinically call "first year cold feet". Hang on buddy, you might find, after all, that healthcare is business, and for you, it might be a reassuring thing.
 

Instatewaiter

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Hey all,

I'm just about to finish my first semester at a DO school. Throughout the entire year I have had serious doubts about my path. I feel like my heart isnt in medicine, or in helping people. I wanted to go to med school for the money, respect, and job security. I value time with my family and fiance more than I would value the salary I'd earn as a future physician. I feel like I dont care about the medical field enough to make the sacrifices I'd need to make in order to become successful in the field. That said, I have been strongly considering taking an LOA and pursuing an MBA in finance, which is something that really interests me. However, my family thinks I will be throwing my life away. And considering I am already 26 with only a degree in Biology, its hard to state my argument against theirs. So, I'm here to ask you guys for your perspective on my situation and if there are many doors to non-clinical jobs that get opened with a DO degree without doing a residency.

Thanks all,

Happy holidays.
First, the whole year?! You mean 4 months?

Second, ha you think the time commitment is bad now? You've seen nothing yet skippy. First and second year are nothing more than a tough semester of college.

Now reality check time: You're in DO school which probably means your grades were less than stellar. That means you're likely looking at second or third tier business schools. The economy blows which means from a crap business school you're going to be unemployed. You might as well get an MBA from university of phoenix then. Ask DeVry if they offer a business degree. So add the debt you've accumulated already through UG and a year of med school to business school without a job and you have a pretty sh1tty investment. Are you sure you think finance is a good idea?

There are options besides clinical work- you can be a consultant for one. Stick it out atleast for a bit longer.
 
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TheWeeIceMan

And like that... *poof*... he's gone.
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For all the people saying get out now it's 7+ years, who says OP needs to do a residency? Why not go through med school setting yourself up for management/health care consulting and once you have the DO, drop off the clinical path and go into that. We got an email recently about this type of thing at my school: http://www.mckinsey.com/careers/create_your_path/career_pathways/career_pathways_advanced_degrees

This way we're only talking about 4 years - and I agree with the poster who thinks OP is just burning out a little.

If you can't stand moving forward at all thats one thing, but if you're only cause for concern is what are you gonna do after school since you don't want to be a full time clinician, spend some time exploring alternative paths before you make a huge decision like this.
Pushing through medical school for a job at McKinsey on the other end is a recipe for disaster.
 

Wordead

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Pushing through medical school for a job at McKinsey on the other end is a recipe for disaster.
+1000 Are you people fcking delusional that's the top consulting company in the nation. You think your MD is going to get you past consulting cases and readjusting to corporate culture? GTFO the skills involved in getting you through medical school are practically worthless in consulting.
 

circulus vitios

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+1000 Are you people fcking delusional that's the top consulting company in the nation. You think your MD is going to get you past consulting cases and readjusting to corporate culture? GTFO the skills involved in getting you through medical school are practically worthless in consulting.
People do go into consulting at consulting firms straight out of medical school, even McKinsey, but you have to know your ****. The interviews are technical, and it's a lot more than finance 101 stuff. Definitely not a "gentleman's course." I imagine the chances of being recruited drop with the rank/name of your school, too.
 

thefritz

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OP, don't worry. Once you're on this train, it's not going to stop. Keep doing your work and before you know it you'll be board certified. You're an M1. You'll soon be so busy that you won't have time to think about alternate careers. You will just want to sleep. If you're not that busy you're doing it wrong.
 

MSTPlease

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Jeez people, I'm not talking about McKinsey specifically. I was merely using that as an example since I just got an email from them last week. My point was just that there are things you can do with a DO that are not "practicing physician" so depending on whether the OP is totally miserable by all things medicine or just by being a physician is an important question.
 
OP
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Jun 26, 2013
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Jeez people, I'm not talking about McKinsey specifically. I was merely using that as an example since I just got an email from them last week. My point was just that there are things you can do with a DO that are not "practicing physician" so depending on whether the OP is totally miserable by all things medicine or just by being a physician is an important question.
To be honest, the thought of walking into another clinical setting makes my skin crawl. I worked as a medical scribe in several ERs over a 2 year span and I feel like I got my fill. I know, it was only the ER, but I've shadowed several docs in different settings and I'd like to think I have a general grasp on what its like to be a doctor. I've been present for 15,000+ pt interviews and exams and at no point did I feel like it was a calling to me...I just thought it was another job. But what I am starting to understand now is that being a doctor isn't a job, its a lifestyle. Most doctors' life revolves around medicine. I want my life to revolve around my wife and family. I don't know why this didn't raise red flags to me at the time, I guess call it blindness toward the sacrifices it took to make it to the light at the end of the tunnel. So basically, I would be using a DO degree just to get my foot in the door for something non-clinically related. So what it comes down to is...is getting 250k in debt for a DO degree worth it if I dont want to take care of people? If I were in an MD school I would feel more inclined to continue because I'm assuming the MD opens more doors than a DO degree.
 

alpinism

Give Em' the Jet Fuel
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People do go into consulting at consulting firms straight out of medical school, even McKinsey, but you have to know your ****. The interviews are technical, and it's a lot more than finance 101 stuff. Definitely not a "gentleman's course." I imagine the chances of being recruited drop with the rank/name of your school, too.
A select few Harvard/Stanford/Yale students do every few years. Not students from low tier MD schools and certainly not DO students.
 

alpinism

Give Em' the Jet Fuel
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To be honest, the thought of walking into another clinical setting makes my skin crawl. I worked as a medical scribe in several ERs over a 2 year span and I feel like I got my fill. I know, it was only the ER, but I've shadowed several docs in different settings and I'd like to think I have a general grasp on what its like to be a doctor. I've been present for 15,000+ pt interviews and exams and at no point did I feel like it was a calling to me...I just thought it was another job. But what I am starting to understand now is that being a doctor isn't a job, its a lifestyle. Most doctors' life revolves around medicine. I want my life to revolve around my wife and family. I don't know why this didn't raise red flags to me at the time, I guess call it blindness toward the sacrifices it took to make it to the light at the end of the tunnel. So basically, I would be using a DO degree just to get my foot in the door for something non-clinically related. So what it comes down to is...is getting 250k in debt for a DO degree worth it if I dont want to take care of people? If I were in an MD school I would feel more inclined to continue because I'm assuming the MD opens more doors than a DO degree.
Why would you go to med school when you clearly hated being around patients as a scribe?
 
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Instatewaiter

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To be honest, the thought of walking into another clinical setting makes my skin crawl. I worked as a medical scribe in several ERs over a 2 year span and I feel like I got my fill. I know, it was only the ER, but I've shadowed several docs in different settings and I'd like to think I have a general grasp on what its like to be a doctor. I've been present for 15,000+ pt interviews and exams and at no point did I feel like it was a calling to me...I just thought it was another job. But what I am starting to understand now is that being a doctor isn't a job, its a lifestyle. Most doctors' life revolves around medicine. I want my life to revolve around my wife and family. I don't know why this didn't raise red flags to me at the time, I guess call it blindness toward the sacrifices it took to make it to the light at the end of the tunnel. So basically, I would be using a DO degree just to get my foot in the door for something non-clinically related. So what it comes down to is...is getting 250k in debt for a DO degree worth it if I dont want to take care of people? If I were in an MD school I would feel more inclined to continue because I'm assuming the MD opens more doors than a DO degree.
I agree about medicine being a job. The people who feel it is a calling are either premeds or few and far between. You do need to realize that the time commitment to become a doctor and then the time you spend doctoring are long. But, there is no other job that has such good job security with a decent wage.

I dont think your time as a scribe in the ED will give you a good understanding of what it's like to be a doctor. Honestly I would have bailed on medicine if I had to do EM. Stick it out longer. The first year sucks for different reasons.

How are your grades. Talk to a counselor. Realize that if you close this door, there is no going back through it ever again. No med school would risk a spot for someone who bailed.
 

Raryn

Infernal Internist / Enigmatic Endocrinologist
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This thread is way too long. The question was "Is med school worth it if you don't want to be a clinician?"

The answer is "No."
 

punkedoutriffs

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To be honest, the thought of walking into another clinical setting makes my skin crawl. I worked as a medical scribe in several ERs over a 2 year span and I feel like I got my fill. I know, it was only the ER, but I've shadowed several docs in different settings and I'd like to think I have a general grasp on what its like to be a doctor. I've been present for 15,000+ pt interviews and exams and at no point did I feel like it was a calling to me...I just thought it was another job. But what I am starting to understand now is that being a doctor isn't a job, its a lifestyle. Most doctors' life revolves around medicine. I want my life to revolve around my wife and family. I don't know why this didn't raise red flags to me at the time, I guess call it blindness toward the sacrifices it took to make it to the light at the end of the tunnel. So basically, I would be using a DO degree just to get my foot in the door for something non-clinically related. So what it comes down to is...is getting 250k in debt for a DO degree worth it if I dont want to take care of people? If I were in an MD school I would feel more inclined to continue because I'm assuming the MD opens more doors than a DO degree.
Dude, a lot of ppl don't like clinic. I've shadowed surgeons who describe clinic as the 5th level of Dante's Inferno. Go into a specialty where you don't have clinic: Anesthesiology, Radiology, Pathology, etc.
 

circulus vitios

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To be honest, the thought of walking into another clinical setting makes my skin crawl. I worked as a medical scribe in several ERs over a 2 year span and I feel like I got my fill. I know, it was only the ER, but I've shadowed several docs in different settings and I'd like to think I have a general grasp on what its like to be a doctor. I've been present for 15,000+ pt interviews and exams and at no point did I feel like it was a calling to me...I just thought it was another job. But what I am starting to understand now is that being a doctor isn't a job, its a lifestyle. Most doctors' life revolves around medicine. I want my life to revolve around my wife and family. I don't know why this didn't raise red flags to me at the time, I guess call it blindness toward the sacrifices it took to make it to the light at the end of the tunnel. So basically, I would be using a DO degree just to get my foot in the door for something non-clinically related. So what it comes down to is...is getting 250k in debt for a DO degree worth it if I dont want to take care of people? If I were in an MD school I would feel more inclined to continue because I'm assuming the MD opens more doors than a DO degree.
Residency is going to suck regardless of specialty but there are specialties with reasonable hours. FM, dermatology, psychiatry, and PM&R are commonly 9-5 or so. Pathology probably isn't too far from 9-5. Emergency medicine physicians commonly work 120-140 hours a month. Hospitalists can work a 7 on 7 off schedule or whatever. (EM and hospitalists are on "swing shift" but millions of people have raised normal and happy families while working the occasional night shift, and I've heard that you could always work straight days if you don't mind taking a lower salary.) There are a few IM subspecialties with reasonable hours: allergy, geriatrics, rheum, and I think pulm, heme/onc, endo, and nephro...but the downside is 4 years of IM residency.

As for having your job, 99.9999% of people hate their job. Doctors aren't special. Put in your work and match into a field that pays well for as few hours as possible. Getting an MBA isn't a shortcut. If you're lucky, you would make $60k/year for 60 hours a week. http://www.businessinsider.com/mba-students-are-deluded-about-salary-2013-7
 
Oct 29, 2013
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Why would you go to med school when you clearly hated being around patients as a scribe?
This.

If you've seen 15,000+ pt. assessments and have shadowed docs, and you know you hate it, why are you in it? If you don't want to be back in the clinic, what are you going to do during your clinical rotations? People and preceptors will know if you don't want to be there. It will affect your performance and grades and anything after that you want to do, clinical or not.

Not trying to be mean, but it seems very clear cut to me. It's not for you. Go do something you want to do while you can.