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Is NY and NJ saturated with Podaitrist? PLEASE HELP!!!!

Discussion in 'Podiatric Residents & Physicians' started by FRA, Dec 6, 2008.

  1. FRA

    FRA
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    I heard that NY and NJ is so saturated with podiatrists that I wouldn't be making much out of residency. And everyone is struggling to find a job. What do u think? Is this true? I'll be making around 50 out of residency?
     
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  3. air bud

    7+ Year Member

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    then move someplace else.
     
  4. diabeticfootdr

    Podiatrist 10+ Year Member

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    If you're dumb enough to accept $50k, then you deserve it.
     
  5. JEWmongous

    JEWmongous Member
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    Some pod residencies in NY pay more than 50K a year (I read around 60K for a few). So if you take a job offer making less than you would during residency, then yes, you are an idiot.
     
  6. FRA

    FRA
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    I never said i'll accept a job with 50..I'm asking about the field out there. How is the podiatry field in NY and NJ after residency? Is it so saturated with podiatrists? What offerings do u get right after residency?
     
  7. 215512

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    there will maybe MAYBE be 3-4 helpful responses and most other people here are going to be rude...just a warning

    In response to your question, just an assumption, but most big city areas are going to be at least a little saturated since cities are more desirable than the country(yuck)...:luck:
     
  8. PMSIII

    7+ Year Member

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    I'm not very sure how many posters here are practicing or doing their training in the NY/NJ area but if you don't get the responses you're looking for then I recommend that you contact some docs or residents through the APMA website and maybe they can give you a better or clearer picture. From my limited knowledge about the area, I do know that the scope of practice in NY is limited to the foot but NJ is expanded to the ankle (as is the case with most of the states in this country). Hope this helps.
     
  9. diabeticfootdr

    Podiatrist 10+ Year Member

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    It's just that I've seen some of your posts and your questions are overly dramatic. Of course, worry about pay, etc., but look at reliable sources - not hearsay. And your post about "how hard is podiatry school?", is offensive since as a podiatrist, you will be a physician and a surgeon. You will take a scalpel and make incisions into patients who trusts in your skills, judgement, and education. Pod school is not easy. It is not less than med school. You have the same responsibilities. Your treatments, including medications you prescribe could kill somebody. It needs to be hard and if you're concerned with how hard it is, or how much it might influence your lifestyle, it is probably not for you.

    Just in case there was a misunderstanding, I'll give you the benefit of the doubt and answer your question.......

    Sure someone in NY may offer you a job for $50k. If you're stupid enough to take it, then so be it. You should be insulted enough by that low-ball offer, that you wouldn't want to work for a greedy SOB like that and tell them to stick it up their @$$!

    NY is saturated, but too saturated is another question. No place it too saturated that a good, competent DPM can't work there. NY is full of palliative care DPMs, since it has one of the poorest scope of practices in the US. Most who want to use their surgical skills they learned in residency - move out of NY. (I did my residency in NYC).

    Just look at average salary data that has been beaten to death on these forums. If you will be salaried by a group, you should ask for >120k your first year. I made $145k plus sign-on bonus, moving expenses, plus all benefits, for my first year. Then subsequent years for me are determined by productivity (which have been substantially more). Most reliable surveys are in the $180k range by the time you are 3-5 years out of residency.

    If you decide to go into private practice, you could be making $50k your first year (net after expenses), but you may have the most income potential after a while. I know some DPMs in NYC who are making >$500k in private practice.

    The major thing is YOU HAVE TO NEGOTIATE. If you're uncomfortable negotiating your salary, you will make less money. I was offered a job for $70k my first year, of course I rejected it without any further discussion.
     
  10. GymMan

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    This isn't any of my business, but won't things/places change in several years anyway? Plus the regions of the country pods earn best is another indicator, when time comes to worry about jobs areas. Also, you need to go where THEY offer you a job not create your own offer in an area just because you claim you "want/like it now". It's like 50 years from when you need to decide anyway. I always wonder about people who put the cart before the horse only to end up as landscapers or truck drivers, instead of their "supposed" residency of choice in blah, blah, blah, field of medicine/healthcare. Its hysterical reading these longshot posts though. A good laugh. :laugh:
     
  11. justtesting

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    its not very often we hear about starting salaries first hand. usually it is "i know a guy who made x amount of money his first year" etc. thanks
     
  12. UNMorBUST

    UNMorBUST Mystery Man
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    I did not understand a word you said:p.
     
  13. jonwill

    jonwill Podiatrist
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    I have yet to see any residents from my program sign for under $150K.
     
  14. phillypd

    phillypd doing BIG Dr things
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    wow really....................but where are they located.....that makes all the difference
    are they in the sticks?
     
  15. phillypd

    phillypd doing BIG Dr things
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    not that the sticks are bad.......i love country life
     
  16. jonwill

    jonwill Podiatrist
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    No, all large cities with pod, multispecialty, and ortho groups. A well trained podiatrist is in very high demand. Nobody can do what we do. Do internists and orthopedic surgeons have to practice in the sticks???
     

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