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Is the Gavitz ("The DO's") the best to read to prepare for an interview?

Discussion in 'Pre-Medical - DO' started by theDr., Mar 15, 2004.

  1. theDr.

    theDr. Senior Member
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    How did most you go about learning the theories and techniques behind the DO profession for your interviews...what is the best way to prepare? thanks
     
  2. Chrisobean

    Chrisobean The Killer Bean
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    this book is a must. it tells the whole history, its very detailed, you can actually skim alot of it. but check for the new edition coming out this month, the previous edition (that i read) is almost 10 years old...
    im sure there are others, but this one was recommended to me by everyone!
     
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  3. HooahDOc

    Physician 15+ Year Member

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    Gevitz goes into way too much detail. Just pickup the big ideas: the origin, why it was started, Still's general philosophy, how it progressed, and where it is today. The book goes into a ton of detail about the huge MD vs DO battle that raged in the early days of osteopathy. You can ignore the detail and still walk away with a good understanding of the origins.
     
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  4. DrMom

    DrMom Official Mom of SDN
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  5. Fenrezz

    Fenrezz AT Stills Worst Nightmare
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    I agree. Nothing is more annoying than going into an interview prepared to debate every detail about the history of osteopathy only to find that they're more interested in why you chose to be a doctor. Just stick to the major details. I think the interviewers will probably be happy just to know that you've actually heard of A.T. Still.

    It might not hurt to go in wearing a cheap t-shirt with that ******ed picture of Still examining the bone. :D
     
  6. Amy B

    Amy B I miss my son so much
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    I bought that because the DO that interviewed me for my LOR letter told me to read it. I thought it was a good source of knowledge. I also did a lot of reading on the internet. There are lots of online reseources. But reading that book can be brought up in an interview to show you have been exploring the DO profession.
     
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  7. Adapt

    Adapt 2K Member
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    theDr., you don't have to read a book about the DO profession to do well at a DO interview. To be honest, the most they may delve into DOs is why DO over MD. Here are some important facts that helped me at my DO interviews.

    Dr. Still was a surgeon for the Union in the civil war. A few of his children died of meningitis and he saw how he couldn't do anything to stop it. Also, he didn't like how doctors would just used medicine for everything so he started his own philosophy. He opened up the first DO school around 1898.

    DOs practice disease prevention. They treat the whole person and don't just look at the symptoms. They believe that the body is interrelated in its function with an integrated mind and body. Manipulation is an added benefit to help patients. DO schools emphasize primary care fields.

    If you know this stuff, that should be enough for a DO interview.
     
  8. PublicHealth

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  9. doyoda2004

    doyoda2004 Junior Member
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    Gevitz is coming out with a new edition of his book later this summer. He is the prime "historian" for the osteopathic profession and he heads the Dept. of Social Medicine at the Ohio University College of Osteopathic Medicine. I reccomend his book highly. He's the man!!!
     
  10. bgreet

    bgreet Dopefish Lives!
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    Osteopathic Medicine - A Reformation in Progress is another great, fairly short one.
     
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  11. DORoe

    DORoe BWAAA HAAA HAAA
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    Sweet I look forward to meeting him next year. His book was very informative.
     
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  12. PTjay

    PTjay Senior Member
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    Go to your local book store and sit down and read "Opportunities in Osteopathic Medicine Careers"
    by Terence J. Sacks

    I say sit down because this is a short book that you could easily finish there and gives a good synopsis of the profession, with some stories from actual physicians, and some decent history. If you're new to the field or just want a better understanding without being bogged down/ need something to kill time on a plane and want to feel prepared, this book is it.

    Good luck,

    Jay
     
  13. A Reformation in Progress is another good read.
     
  14. tkim

    tkim 10 cc's cordrazine
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  15. PublicHealth

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  16. Amy B

    Amy B I miss my son so much
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    This is the other one the DO wanted me to read. I did and it was ok as well.
     
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  17. Ohiobuddhist

    Ohiobuddhist Member
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    If you really care enough to understand the current state of osteopathy and its future, then you need to understand its past. The Gevitz book is the only nearly complete history we have of our profession. I'll admit there are some dry chapters, but if you actually care about the profession of osteopathy, the least you could do is read the damn book. It isn't even that long. I must say that I find it discouraging to see other DO students post that you can shortcut your way through the interview. They are right, but I find it a sad comment on our profession's evolution.

    That said, there are a number of fine books out there about osteopathy. Gevitz' book at present however is the most complete. Trust me I'm not just plugging his book because he works at my school. I've had more interesting professors. I just think it's ironic that the division that exists throughout colleges and universities in this country regarding the separation of the natural sciences from history and humanities can play out in such a sad way. Let's see...I want to be a doctor...maybe a DO....well, maybe I should figure out what a DO is...ok, there's two or three books....well, hell, one's a whole hundred pages longer than the other....screw that long book...give me the Cliff notes on my future profession. This seems to be a pretty prevalent mindset. In my own class, I am sure there are few who have spent the time to actually read the brief history of osteopathy. Hmmm....I wonder if the reason so few DOs do any manipulation has anything to do with the fact that none of them really understand WHY they graduated from a DO institution. Nah, that can't be it.

    OK, I'm done being sarcastic and angry today. Sorry for the rant.
     
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  18. Chrisobean

    Chrisobean The Killer Bean
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    i understand your point...
    i read the whole book, it took me a couple of subway rides home from work... but there are definitely places where you can skim, like where it gives alot of statistics and graphs... i dont think skimming that will hinder your understanding of the profession.
     
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  19. sportsmedicjim

    sportsmedicjim Junior Member
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    One person's humble opinion...Gavitz book has some decent history but it leaves the reader wondering if D.O.'s or the profession itself wants to be unique?? Will osteopathy last?

    The book is somewhat old but I look forward to reading a newer version.

    With that said, may I recommend Dr. Fulford's "Touch of Life". What a D.O.!!! I found myself laughing at his stories and wanting to be a D.O.... :clap:

    Jim
    MUSC
    Class of 2008
     
  20. PTjay

    PTjay Senior Member
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    ohiobuddhist,

    i completely agree with your post above and feel that if you're going into the profession the least you can do is get a thorough background of what it includes. i only suggested the "shortcut" book because it sounds like the OP needs to get some succinct information quickly for upcoming interviews.

    for the record the Gevitz book is on my list to get picked up but it is hard to find and i don't usually like to order things on line.

    if you have the time read Gevitz, if not there are still sources of information available that will give you a brief, although not very detailed background.

    -J
     
  21. Ohiobuddhist

    Ohiobuddhist Member
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    sportsmedicjim mentioned Dr. Fulford's book, Touch of Life. This is a spectacular book. Unfortunately, I wasn't introduced to it until after a year of school. Dr. Fulford was a giant in the osteopathic community and his book provides a wonderful insight into osteopathic practice. I would definitely recommend it to anyone interested in osteopathy. Also note that the introduction was written by prominent complimentary medicine specialist and Harvard-trained MD, Andrew Weil.
     
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