PAPPAPPAP

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Its worth a shot...Does anyone knows of any good sites for pre-laws..my girlfriend is looking into law schools and I know how helpful SDN has been for me..
 

bidster

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PAPPAPPAP said:
Its worth a shot...Does anyone knows of any good sites for pre-laws..my girlfriend is looking into law schools and I know how helpful SDN has been for me..
I have several friends in the midst of law apps who are mad addicted to these sites:

http://www.xoxohth.com (xoxohth=hugs and kisses, hope this helps)

http://www.lawschooldiscussion.org (also known as "LSD")
 

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i really want to make an sdn type site for researchers at my school to communicate, but i dont know anything about webmastering and thus cant take initiative without asking others for help. its not too good of a feeling but its a great vision, forums are wonderful.
 

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Just be forewarned that they are genuinely evil at LSD.

Princeton Review used to have the most happening law school discussion board, but they cracked down on the evil posting, and the future-lawyers migrated elsewhere.

Defintely some characters that used to post there. They made it a habit to torture medical school students, who all too often took the bait.

Back in the days, ya know?
 

XYF

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bidster said:
http://www.xoxohth.com (xoxohth=hugs and kisses, hope this helps)

http://www.lawschooldiscussion.org (also known as "LSD")
The guys at xoxo seem a whole lot more knowledgeable than at LSD, but then, theyre very elitist. If you're shooting high, then definately do to xoxo. (Go there too if you want to troll) The posters at princeton review mostly migrated to xoxo after PR changed their format so PR is dead - dont go there.
 

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So I clicked on the "xoxo" site just out of curiosity, and saw a thread about Hunter S. Thompson committing suicide, which I hadn't heard about yet. Which has nothing whatsoever to do with law school or this thread, but I was sad to read it anyway. :( I feel like I should go drop some acid to honor his passing...if only I were still a teenager. ;)
 

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This is interesting:

In general, interviews are not a part of the law school admission process. You are encouraged to visit law schools to gather information, and often an appointment with admission personnel will be a part of the visit. The purpose of your conversation with the admission staff usually will be informational rather than evaluative and will not become a part of your admission file. A school occasionally will grant an interview, and some may even request it, but, in general, you should not count on an interview as a means to state your case for admission; this is best done in a personal statement.
I wonder why that is...
 

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freaker said:
Just be forewarned that they are genuinely evil at LSD.

Princeton Review used to have the most happening law school discussion board, but they cracked down on the evil posting, and the future-lawyers migrated elsewhere.

Defintely some characters that used to post there. They made it a habit to torture medical school students, who all too often took the bait.

Back in the days, ya know?
no one ever posted on the med school site of Princeton Review. I mean never; a couple times I did and the same message was on top for a month. However someone over there did direct me here, so now you guys are stuck with me. :D You remember those evil guys from PR and why they had to switch to the new board? :smuggrin:
 

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Mistress S said:
So I clicked on the "xoxo" site just out of curiosity, and saw a thread about Hunter S. Thompson committing suicide, which I hadn't heard about yet. Which has nothing whatsoever to do with law school or this thread, but I was sad to read it anyway. :( I feel like I should go drop some acid to honor his passing...if only I were still a teenager. ;)
did you read any of the other threads? That site, especially the law board is a joke and there is no moderation, people post others' personal info and no one cares including the developers of the board.
 

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Psycho Doctor said:
did you read any of the other threads? That site, especially the law board is a joke and there is no moderation, people post others' personal info and no one cares including the developers of the board.
I only glanced at the other threads...not really interested in the struggles and drama of pre-law students, I've had enough of that with pre-med! ;) But the Hunter S. Thompson thing is legit, I checked it out. Too bad.
 

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Ross434 said:
The equivalent site of residency and the GME boards here is at

http://www.greedyassociates.com/messageboard/boards.php

That one's for if you want to learn about people trying to get 1st year jobs at big firms. (and big money)
Yeah, this was the big one for young lawyers a few years back, hosted I believe, by infirmation.com. The "greedy" moniker emerged as the newbie lawyers at different firms used the boards to share salary information of various firms, and basically forced equally statured firms to come into line with salaries or not be deemed competitive by the better applicants. It served sort of a collective bargaining function, and helped foster the huge jumps in salaries of the bigger firms trying to shake loose the better associates during the dot com boom. Not sure if it has the same following now that the dot com boom ended. There are (or at least used to be) a bunch of "greedy" associates, law students etc. boards on infirmation.com divided by region.
 

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Psycho Doctor said:
However someone over there did direct me here, so now you guys are stuck with me. :D
:laugh: :laugh:

i could have sworn you only have 3000+ posts a few days ago. I swear you are going to have like 10k before med school starts :D
 

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tinkerbelle said:
:laugh: :laugh:

i could have sworn you only have 3000+ posts a few days ago. I swear you are going to have like 10k before med school starts :D
yea i did and i didn't even see it change; it's just slightly above the 4000, and I really haven't been posting much recently and probably won't continue to in the future.
 

freaker

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trinitrotoluene said:
This is interesting:

I wonder why that is...
In a word: Prestige.

Law schools don't care about your extracurricular activities. They don't care about why you want to be a lawyer. They pretty much just care about your numbers.

It makes sense. Where you go to school is gigantic in law school. The rankings of top 3, top 6, top 9, and top 14 do mean something, and quite tangibly so. When you begin to look at Supreme Court clerkships and federal circuit court clerkships, you'll see what I mean. Same thing for average starting salary.

Almost everyone at a top 14 starts out at 100k+. The same cannot be said for even top 25 law schools.

Thus, law schools are at war with one another to gain even a slot or two, and since US News ranks using only numbers, that's what they're after.

It's far more objective, and in some ways, more fair. There are very few value judgements.

Seriously, numbers account for 90% of your application (with the LSAT being worth about 75%). There are sites where you can type in your numbers, and a program will spit out your odds of admissions. They were extremely accurate in my case, and I got in where I expected to get in and was waitlisted where I thought I might be waitlisted.

Extracurriculars really only greatly matter at Yale and Stanford--to a lesser degree, Harvard. Maybe somewhat at Chicago and Columbia.

Guess I was wrong about LSD v. xoxo. As I said, I left in the heyday of PR. "I hope this helps" (HTH) was a sarcastic phrase used to end a smartass reply. I'm sure TTT is still around, too. Just a bit of advice: it would be a mistake for a girl to post her picture on xoxo if it's at all like PR used to be.

If any of you are interested in law, Greedy Associates is, as mentioned, a very informative site.
 

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freaker said:
In a word: Prestige.

Law schools don't care about your extracurricular activities. They don't care about why you want to be a lawyer. They pretty much just care about your numbers.

It makes sense. Where you go to school is gigantic in law school. The rankings of top 3, top 6, top 9, and top 14 do mean something, and quite tangibly so. When you begin to look at Supreme Court clerkships and federal circuit court clerkships, you'll see what I mean. Same thing for average starting salary.

Almost everyone at a top 14 starts out at 100k+. The same cannot be said for even top 25 law schools.

Thus, law schools are at war with one another to gain even a slot or two, and since US News ranks using only numbers, that's what they're after.

It's far more objective, and in some ways, more fair. There are very few value judgements.

Seriously, numbers account for 90% of your application (with the LSAT being worth about 75%). There are sites where you can type in your numbers, and a program will spit out your odds of admissions. They were extremely accurate in my case, and I got in where I expected to get in and was waitlisted where I thought I might be waitlisted.

Extracurriculars really only greatly matter at Yale and Stanford--to a lesser degree, Harvard. Maybe somewhat at Chicago and Columbia.

Guess I was wrong about LSD v. xoxo. As I said, I left in the heyday of PR. "I hope this helps" (HTH) was a sarcastic phrase used to end a smartass reply. I'm sure TTT is still around, too. Just a bit of advice: it would be a mistake for a girl to post her picture on xoxo if it's at all like PR used to be.

If any of you are interested in law, Greedy Associates is, as mentioned, a very informative site.
I basically agree with this post, with one adjustment -- I would also add that where you went to undergrad is significantly more important in applying to law school than in med school (i.e. people from Harvard, Yale etc. with relatively average numbers still get in at pretty decent law schools). While schools love to demonstrate higher numbers for US News ranking purposes, the non-top-twenty schools also love to show to prospective students that they even land matriculants from the big three ivies.
Law schools differ than med school in that there are a ton of them and they aren't very regulated as to how many people they can take in (it's just a matter of infrastructure/seats); the various state bars are given the task to regulate the number of people who actually enter the profession. Thus while the worst person in a med school class is still called "doctor", the worst person in a law school class is sometimes called "unemployed". It's not a fair comparison -- you can't afford to be average in law, but will probably do okay in medicine (just not in a more competitive residency). Then again the average person who gets into law school doesn't have close to the numbers of the average allo med school matriculant. That's why I don't think it's a fair comparison to look at averages across the professions -- anyone who got into an allo school would have the numbers and brain power to get into and do well at a decent law school, and wouldn't be average.
As far as the schools at which you are "set", I would adjust this a bit. Clearly if you want a Supreme Court clerkship (which a negligible percentage of law students get), you would need to go to one of the top ten law schools and be one of the best in your class -- Justice Scalia is on record stating that he and other judges simply don't look at any other schools for clerks.
I think everyone in the top dozen or so schools is probably set in terms of big firm salaries (if they choose it -- it's not something everyone aspires to), and after that it depends more on class rank and law review (Meaning that someone who went to the 13th through 50th ranked school can still get the big firm job/salary, but they'd better be summa cum laude and law review (or close to it) to consider it a "sure thing". But there are still very many people in law who defy the odds and get the nice cushy salaries (and hellish hours) -- if not in the first year, then a few years out. Clerkships and short term government ("revolving door") positions for a year or two put a lot of the not as top-percentile folks in line for decent salaries when those wrap up.
Law, unlike medicine, is much more regional than medicine -- if you want to work in Chicago and you are not top ten school caliber, you are at an extremely huge advantage if you go to even a lower ranked school in Chicago. And the highest salaries always tend to be at the biggest firms in the biggest cities, so if big bucks are what you are after, you'd better be a city person. Okay -- I've rambled enough -- hope that was helpful.