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Is there anything you plan to do BETTER than some or all of today's doctor's when you become a dr?

Discussion in 'Pre-Medical - MD' started by Gauss44, May 19, 2014.

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  1. Gauss44

    Gauss44 2+ Year Member

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    Title says it all.
     
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  3. mrh125

    mrh125 Banned Banned Account on Hold

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    lmao i read wrong. I'm thinking researching conditions and knowing more about advanced treatments. Also, not being so willing to pretend I know everything and overgeneralize and stereotype the hell out of patients. I won't be as afraid as some doctors are to say "I don't know" either, instead of acting like they know it all. Most of us will probably end up making a lot of the mistakes current doctors do because that's just the way it goes.
     
    Last edited: May 19, 2014
    Cyberdyne 101 likes this.
  4. Gauss44

    Gauss44 2+ Year Member

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    Nothing huge, but I plan to read my summaries of what a patient tells me back to the patient to make sure it's correct.

    (Why? I had a neurologist do this with me a while back and thought it was a great move. I will add that having ordered all of my medical records, I have found some pretty major mistakes on some of them. One example, I went to see the doctor years ago for a pain near my neck and he wrote, "patient complains of lower back pain." Whoops! This way, when I become a doctor, I won't do the same thing, hopefully.)
     
  5. TheWeeIceMan

    TheWeeIceMan And like that... *poof*... he's gone. 7+ Year Member

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    I wouldn't presume to think that I will be able to do anything better clinically than current physicians, but I will say that I don't want to fall into many of the financial traps that some current doctors find themselves in. You can do quite well financially on a physician's income if you know how to manage your money and not live beyond your means.
     
  6. youmed

    youmed 5+ Year Member

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    Start thinking about it when you become a doctor.
     
    DermViser likes this.
  7. PreMedOrDead

    PreMedOrDead I'm sure you'll get in... 2+ Year Member

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    OP I'm going to be the best doctor that has ever existed with my name and birth date.

    Life isn't a competition.

    Ah yes, the good ole SDN

     
  8. bear2roo

    bear2roo Dr. Kenzō Tenma 2+ Year Member

    Cure cancer
     
    The Buff OP likes this.
  9. J Senpai

    J Senpai Grab my arm. Other arm. MY other arm. 5+ Year Member

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    I don't want to be that doctor that chats so incessantly during appointments that nothing ever gets accomplished for the patient. But I don't chat anyway, so, boom. Best doctor ever.
     
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  10. PreMedOrDead

    PreMedOrDead I'm sure you'll get in... 2+ Year Member

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    MDApps:
    "Hey @J Senpai , how are you today?"

    "It's cancer, here's your referral."

    "Wha- what?"
     
  11. J Senpai

    J Senpai Grab my arm. Other arm. MY other arm. 5+ Year Member

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    Pfft! With a bit more tact than that, I hope!


    My FP will go on forever about completely unrelated stuff, though. Mostly pertaining to him, though he is a good listener...when he does listen. A check-up can last for like 3 hours with him. -_-
     
    Narmerguy likes this.
  12. LostinLift

    LostinLift 2+ Year Member

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    I will do everything better.
     
  13. PreMedOrDead

    PreMedOrDead I'm sure you'll get in... 2+ Year Member

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  14. mik30102

    mik30102 5+ Year Member

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    Pharmacist
    Utilize drugs more rationally :D
     
  15. LostinLift

    LostinLift 2+ Year Member

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    Darth Doc, nemo123, La Presse and 8 others like this.
  16. Aerus

    Aerus Elemental Alchemist 5+ Year Member

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    Chatting for primary care physicians establishes a relationship. Believe it or not, some patients like it when their doctor can establish some sort of relationship and cares about them beyond medical issues.
     
    Winged Scapula likes this.
  17. ridethecliche

    ridethecliche Meep Meep Meep 5+ Year Member

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    My PCP told me I had nice abs. She's pretty awesome and she was right.
     
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  18. frosted_flake

    frosted_flake waaahmbulance attendant Gold Donor 2+ Year Member

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    Actually listen to my patient. For instance sometimes I have tried to mention something to a doc before and they usually just brush it off as if it is not important...
    And then you have some people are full of drama and boo-hoo's
     
    Gauss44 likes this.
  19. Cyberdyne 101

    Cyberdyne 101 It's a dry heat Gold Donor 2+ Year Member

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    I will not "diagnose" something I know little or nothing about. And if I become a surgeon, I'll explore every possible non-surgical option for my patients.
     
    Gauss44 likes this.
  20. J Senpai

    J Senpai Grab my arm. Other arm. MY other arm. 5+ Year Member

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    You don't understand. My grandmother spends an average of 4 hours (not exaggerating) in the waiting room for her monthly appt because he is chatting up patients in the exam rooms. Everyone complains about it. It's over the top and doesn't endear you to him like you are suggesting.
     
    Hulk Smash likes this.
  21. Gauss44

    Gauss44 2+ Year Member

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    Something else I've thought about is trying to create a "judgement-free zone." If I were a primary care in private practice, I might put pamphlets in the waiting area that explain that the staff and myself (and possibly other doctors in my practice) share the belief that ALL patients deserve our best effort regardless of lifestyle, religion, healthy or healthy behavior, etc. I would do that because I believe that too many patients are afraid to tell their doctor the full truth for fear of being judged or valued less. I would include, but not limit that group to some patients who have tattoos, have had sex with more than one person recently, have some reason for not following the doctor's previous advice, are LGBT, smoke cigarettes, etc.
     
  22. jm192

    jm192 7+ Year Member

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    Most doctors provide quality care and their best effort regardless of all of these things.
    As physicians tend to be caring individuals--they try to help everyone.
    Generally speaking, if you give substandard care, you risk getting sued.

    I've never witnessed a physician give less effort due to any of the things you mentioned.

    The only time I feel like doctors get "judgemental" is when dealing with drug seeking behavior. And I think the ones that lie to the doctor have alterior motives for doing so.

    You'll find judgemental people in every walk of life. But to generalize all doctors as judgmental A-Holes who don't treat homosexuals or smokers the same as everyone else is a gross generalization that is wildly incorrect.
     
  23. Member 0922

    Member 0922

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    I don't think the poster was saying all doctors are judgmental a-holes... The overwhelming majority aren't and do want to help everyone equally. Instead, I think the poster was trying to say it is common for a patient to feel uncomfortable telling a doctor the whole story sometimes or not following orders because it might be embarrassing. And to counter that, he wants to make it clear that they can be comfortable around him and disclose sensitive info.
     
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  24. touchpause13

    touchpause13 nolite te bastardes carborundorum 5+ Year Member

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    My ortho did this too. It was so so helpful for me to have basically a summary of everything we talked about and the ability to correct him if he made a mistake in what I said. Just brilliant IMO
     
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  25. Gauss44

    Gauss44 2+ Year Member

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    If I notice and have insight into a problem with healthcare law or nationwide healthcare policy, I will (either officially or anonymously) speak with people who are likely to have the power, wherewithal, and time to fix things. This might include scheduling 15 minute meetings with members of congress (which constituents schedule all the time), meetings with organizations that share my goals, potentially with activists (there are good non-militant activists!), other doctors, etc. One thing I love about politicians is that they are often determined to change laws and society and are often successful!
     
  26. Frazier

    Frazier Emergentologist Lifetime Donor 7+ Year Member

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    You will find when you start med school that from the very first day of your medical interviewing course, you are supposed to summarize to the patient and restate your takeaway from the interview.

    It is not novel.

    Whether or not your docs actually do it...well...
     
    mvenus929 likes this.
  27. Fisherman1

    Fisherman1

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    I'd like to put more emphasis on educating my patients, not just treating them. Doctor-patient interactions can be tremendous learning opportunities. Every appointment doesn't have to turn into a biology lesson, but health literacy is a huge problem in this country, and physicians are in a great position to help address that issue. For example, when a kid comes in with a broken arm, rather than just resetting it, putting a cast on, and saying "have a nice day," take a couple minutes to talk about the "machines" (osteoclasts/osteoblasts) that are going to clean up the break and lay down new bone. Ultimately, I'd like to teach my patients about what is happening in their bodies and hopefully use those experiences to get them more invested in properly caring for themselves.
     
  28. Perrotfish

    Perrotfish Has an MD in Horribleness 10+ Year Member

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    Thoughts:

    1) Most physicians have contracts where their pay is linked to productivity. You are going to be strongly disincentivised from spending extra time with patients.

    2) There's a reason you don't want to spend time over educating: there's a doctor shortage in this country. Ever been through the wait in the ED? Your time is going to get used one way or another, you either fix two people, or leave one suffering while you fix the other one one and then explain things to him.

    3) Not everything requires an education and not everyone wants one. My last job was as a mechanical engineer. When you buy your toaster, do you want the engineer who designed it to call you and explain how he calculated the thermal diffusion coefficient of the plastic to make sure that the customers don't burn themselves? If you're like most people the answer is no: you only care that it works. Education is important when the patient needs to use that education to actively, consciously manage their condition (asthma, diabetes, obesity) or when they need a minimal level of knowledge to decide if the risks of treatment outweigh the benefits (surgery). No patient needs to know how a casted bone heals, because patients don't have an active role in the healing process. They just needs to know not to get the cast wet and not to try to use the limb to bear weight.

    4) If you do need to educate a patient, there are cheaper educators than doctors. We have asthma educators, diabetes educators, dieticians, and experienced nurses that can take more time than you and can educate the patient at a fraction of the cost.

    If you like to teach, don't worry, there will still be opportunities, it will just be with medical students and residents. That will save a lot more lives (and you'll get a lot more positive feedback)
     
  29. optimistic3

    optimistic3 2+ Year Member

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    If I ever make it and become a physician, I want to be sure to follow up with my patients. I had symptoms for 1 year and saw 10 different doctors trying to figure out what was wrong. If someone had followed up with me and really tried to guide me when I was a scared patient who didn't know what more to do rather than seeing many different physicians in different specialties, maybe we could've figured out that I had cancer sooner by ordering more tests. All I needed was a CT scan to find it.

    I think if a patient comes to me with an important issue, I'd either want to see them soon again at a follow up appointment or at least just call them and ask how they are doing and see if further treatment options need to be explored. Maybe this is not feasible in real life but it's idyllic, I guess.
     
  30. loltopsy

    loltopsy 2+ Year Member

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    Hate to break it to you but this is one of the first things we learned to do during our first year doctoring class. It's like one step above 'calling the patient Mr/Mrs Doe'.
     
  31. jm192

    jm192 7+ Year Member

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    While I'm sure that's incredibly scary/frustrating--there are limits as to what you're going to be able to feasibly do as a physician.

    When you see patients for sick visits--you tell them to come back in a given time frame if they're still having symptoms. If a patient doesn't return, that's typically the indication that they are no longer having symptoms. You're going to call 1,000 patients and have 1,000 of them tell you they're completely better or improving. It becomes a waste of time and resources. And then if you start calling them in your free time...

    You'll certainly get it wrong. But most of them are going to come back.

    Either A. YOU as the patient had the burden to follow up and say that you weren't getting better--in which case you did and they really tried to guide you
    or B: You didn't follow up and went to a new doctor and started the process over again.

    You're going to have to expect SOMETHING out of the patient in their own care.
     
    Scottpilot likes this.
  32. jm192

    jm192 7+ Year Member

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    This.

    I feel like this whole thread is full of misunderstanding of what actually goes on and/or what is feasible.
     
    mvenus929 likes this.
  33. NickNaylor

    NickNaylor Thank You for Smoking Lifetime Donor 7+ Year Member

    This thread is just gold. I appreciate the idealism, but I'm forseeing a lot of shattered dreams in the next few years.
     
  34. DermViser

    DermViser 5+ Year Member

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    I love millenial premeds.
     
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  35. Mad Jack

    Mad Jack Critically Caring Gold Donor 2+ Year Member

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    I plan to troll harder than any doctor has ever trolled before.
     
  36. popopopop

    popopopop 5+ Year Member

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    If in a hospital setting, say hello to staff, know people's names.
     
  37. Kaputt

    Kaputt 2+ Year Member

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    lol

    yeah

    sure

    this is going to happen
     
    DermViser likes this.
  38. SouthernSurgeon

    SouthernSurgeon Lifetime Donor 7+ Year Member

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    Me surgeon. Me like cut good.

    We actually think a lot about the non-surgical options for patients. You'd probably be surprised to find that the vast majority of surgeons are actually quite deliberate about who they operate on. When we get consults from medicine, oncology, etc, we are often the ones telling them no and they are pushing us for an intervention.
     
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  39. optimistic3

    optimistic3 2+ Year Member

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    I can definitely understand this. Like I said, I realize it may not be feasible. Thanks.
     
  40. DermViser

    DermViser 5+ Year Member

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    :lol::lol::lol::lol::lol:
     
  41. DermViser

    DermViser 5+ Year Member

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    Well President Obama says that those awful, greedy surgeons like to pluck out people's tonsils and cut diabetic's feet due to the fee schedule, so it's not at all surprising that this type of slander has trickled to the millenial, save the world, premed crowd.
     
    Winged Scapula likes this.
  42. jm192

    jm192 7+ Year Member

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    Since someone hit on the other point:

    Most doctors don't.

    You aren't walking around without an MS diagnosis without having seen a neurologist.
    Your PCP may think you have Lupus or RA, but he's sending you to Rheum.
     
  43. Cyberdyne 101

    Cyberdyne 101 It's a dry heat Gold Donor 2+ Year Member

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    Most maybe. But unfortunately not in my experience. And there is the possibility of being misdiagnosed and/or getting the wrong treatment from a specialist.
     
  44. jm192

    jm192 7+ Year Member

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    Well sure. Everyone gets it wrong. No one is arguing that.

    But your Family/IM doctor isn't diagnosing you with diseases they aren't experienced in diagnosing or managing. Patients with neuro diagnoses have regular neuro visits. People with Rheum diseases have regular Rheum appointments.

    The ER much of the time just arrives at a differential and refers you to inpatient or outpatient.

    I'm sure you've experienced doctors trying to diagnose something they aren't as familiar with. But, as far as the "change the way medicine is done" theme of this thread--on the whole, you're taught to practice within your scope and when to refer.
     
  45. La Presse

    La Presse Due to the fact.... 5+ Year Member

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    WHAT I LEARNED IN MEDICAL SCHOOL TODAY IS.......
     
  46. Cyberdyne 101

    Cyberdyne 101 It's a dry heat Gold Donor 2+ Year Member

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    This is precisely what happened to me and it was a nightmare. And it's tough to have regular appointments when you're uninsured.
     
  47. raiderette

    raiderette 2+ Year Member

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    If I am in family practice I would participate in health fairs or community education programs a few times a year. I like the idea of reaching out to people in different settings.
     
  48. Cyberdyne 101

    Cyberdyne 101 It's a dry heat Gold Donor 2+ Year Member

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    It's not quite slander when it's happened to ppl close to you. And as @southernIM pointed out, the vast majority seem to be doing what's right. And there's nothing wrong with wanting to continue that positive trend. Notice that the thread refers to "some or all." "Some" could refer to 10% or less but that's still enough to cause significant damage.
     
  49. DermViser

    DermViser 5+ Year Member

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    You left out the "or all" part.
     
  50. DermViser

    DermViser 5+ Year Member

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    You know that surgeons want to protect their morbidity/mortality numbers right?
     
  51. Cyberdyne 101

    Cyberdyne 101 It's a dry heat Gold Donor 2+ Year Member

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    No I did not.
    "Notice that the thread refers to some or all." And I chose to elaborate on the "some."
     

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