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Is There M.d In Pharmacology In Us

Discussion in 'Pharmacy' started by lejijohn, Nov 18, 2005.

  1. lejijohn

    lejijohn New Member

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    halo friends , my name is dr leji john and i am from india , from where i have completed my undergraduate studies in medicine, i M.BB.S. although pharmacology was a subject in my curriculum , i am not a full time pharmacy student , back here in india we have something called M.D in pharmacology which consists of three years of residency just like in M.D in INTERNAL MEDICINE?i would like to know does UNITED STATES hae anything called as M.D PHARMACOLOGY , and if so is USMLE required for it like the other clinical courses or is gre required for it and if so whats the degree u get an ms/phd? or an md . i would like to join a pharmaceutical firm back in india after this and so guys if u could help me out as to which course would be most beneficial in order to get a better pay package?pls reply guys
    leji
     
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  3. pharmagirl

    5+ Year Member

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    I have never heard of an MD in pharmacology, but that doesn't mean that it doesn't exist.

    Have you thought of going to pharmacy school?
     
  4. bananaface

    bananaface Pharmacy Supernerd
    Pharmacist Moderator Emeritus Lifetime Donor Classifieds Approved 10+ Year Member

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    You can get an MD and a PhD in pharmacology separately. I don't know of any programs here that combine the two.
     
  5. lord999

    Pharmacist Faculty Moderator Emeritus 10+ Year Member

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    There used to be an odd-duck clinical specialty called "clinical pharmacology", but these fellows are disappearing into academia or industry. I haven't seen one in clinical practice in a long time, the Mayo Clinic excepted.
     
  6. ButlerPharm.D.

    ButlerPharm.D. Honor Before Glory
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    You can get your Ph.D. in Pharmacology, you'd have to the the GRE and TOEFL. Hope this helps.
     
  7. ProZackMI

    ProZackMI Psychiatrist/Attorney
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    There is no such thing as a medical specialization as a pharmacologist, although many pharmacologists do have an MD or PharmD as well as a PhD. To be a pharmacologist, you need a PhD or ScD (Doctorate in Science) in pharmacology.

    I do believe there are post doctoral fellowships in pharmacology for PhDs, but there are no residencies as their job is not clinical, but rather research oriented.

    There are medical pharmacologists who typically have an MD or DO degree and a PhD (sometimes only an MS) and specialize in clinical pharmacology. Usually, however, they do a standard residency (IM, psych, peds, rad, etc.) and then complete a PhD with individualized pharm research, which is often followed by a fellowship. For the most part, the MD-PhD medical pharmacologists are researchers, not clinicians.

    I've seen a few PharmD-PhD pharmacologists who are also clinical pharmacists.

    In the US, the MD degree is equivalent to the MBBS (Bachelor's of Medicine) degree in India. In India, like in the UK, the MD degree is a "graduate" degree equivalent to the PhD and requires a dissertation and original research. In the US, an MD is a graduate degree (but a professional one) like a PharmD, DVM, DDS, JD, etc., but it is not an academic doctorate like the PhD; it is a professional degree whereby clinical and professional skills are imparted along with substantive knowledge, but there is little if any research required for the degree and no thesis/dissertation, which is why many debate whether the MD is really just a puffed up undergraduate degree or something more akin to a master's degree.
     
  8. Sosumi

    Sosumi Senior Member
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    In Germany, it's like that too. It's 5 years post high school, but they require a research thesis upon completion of their M.D. according to a German M.D. I know. I think those who debate the M.D. are mostly Ph.D.'s who look down on an M.D.'s ability to conduct basic science or clinical research. At least that's how it felt at my undergraduate university where they confer degree from lowest (B.A.) to highest (Ph.D.) where the M.D.s were called second last. It was also like that when I was in the pharmacology department at the University of Virginia.

    My best friend at UVA was in the M.D./Ph.D. medical scientist program although she's going into pediatrics instead of research. It takes so many years of your life for less money even though they're better trained to conduct research. At least these programs pay for your entire medical education and provide a stipend unlike the Pharm.D./Ph.D. programs which only cover it after you graduate from pharmacy school.
     
  9. SomeGuy

    SomeGuy Senior Member
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    Incorrect, in the US, an MD is an undergraduate degree, along with the other degrees you listed. No prior degree is required (though some schools do have their policies).

    You certainly do not get a PhD for the money, you do it because you want to, which is why I trust/respect them greatly.
     
  10. beastmaster

    beastmaster Senior Member
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    Med school in the US is considered undergraduate medical education, residency being graduate (and paid) medical education/job.

    For many in Asia, the stipend of a PHD/post-doc and then perhaps even research job all here in the US is a very lucrative option, which is probably why academia hasn't collapsed yet.
     
  11. ProZackMI

    ProZackMI Psychiatrist/Attorney
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    Try getting into an accredited medical or law school without a previous undergraduate education. I don't care what your scores are grades are, you won't get into an MD, DDS, or JD program without a BA/BS unless you simply walk on water. A prior degree IS more often than not required, in fact, it is required. It's a very rare candidate who matriculates into an MD or JD program without a prior BA/BS.

    Optometry, chiro, and pharm are not as stringent, but even these programs are changing and requiring a BS first.

    It's irrelevant that you don't have to major in "medicine" or "law" as an undergraduate. It's irrelevant that the MD/JD etc. is structured differently from a PhD. The degrees I listed are considered graduate/professional and are not classified as undergraduate degrees by the US Dept of Education. In medicine, the MD is called undergraduate because the residency is considered post graduate.
     
  12. sdn1977

    sdn1977 Senior Member
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    Gosh...I can speak to this since we just went through this with our daughter. She is a first year medical student in the US. MOST all require an undergraduate BS/BA degree to be accepted. However...there are a handful of programs (like 9 if I remember) who do something like an "early acceptance" to medical school in which they are accepted after 9 quarters (or 6 semesters), but their medical education is longer because they receive their bachelor's degree concurrently with their doctor of medicine degree. But...back to the original question...the training of a medical doctor is uniform for the first four years - they all must take 2 licensing examinations (USMLE step I & II) to actually practice medicine. After their four years, they then pursue specialities - radiology, surgery, pediatrics. Residencies can be clinical or research oriented - which is often where the MD's who like pharmacology go and then end up with drug development or other related fields. I honestly cannot speak to foreign medical graduate requirements in medicine, but I think there are other forums for that.
     
  13. tupac_don

    tupac_don Senior Member
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    No never heard of a degree MD in pharmacology. You can get a medical degree, and do some sort of internship, with heavy research focus. I guess that would be somewhat similar. Or become an MD then do PhD in pharmacology. But just to have an MD degree focusing on pharmacology, I never heard of any such thing.
     

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