Rxnupe

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Ok enough is enough- I thought maybe it was one or 2 MD's but on a daily basis- I would say on average at least 5 to 10 times a day we have customers coming to the pharmacy- either in store or drive thru to pick up their meds. Ok- their meds are not quite ready and this is the typical response from the customer: My Doctor said he "emailed" the prescriptions and told me to come right over. We than ask how long ago? The customer replies: I just left the MD's office 10 minutes ago..."

Now if MD's think they can simply escribe a script and tell the customer go head over to the pharmacy right now and it will be ready than truly MD's have lost respect for the pharmacy business.
I would never tell a customer- go to the MD's office and you will be treated within 10 minutes of arrival.

Have any of you had this daily nightmare?
 
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Lubeckd

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Ok enough is enough- I thought maybe it was one or 2 MD's but on a daily basis- I would say on average at least 5 to 10 times a day we have customers coming to the pharmacy- either in store or drive thru to pick up their meds. Ok- their meds are not quite ready and this is the typical response from the customer: My Doctor said he "emailed" the prescriptions and told me to come right over. We than ask how long ago? The customer replies: I just left the MD's office 10 minutes ago..."

Now if MD's think they can simply escribe a script and tell the customer go head over to the pharmacy right now and it will be ready than truly MD's have lost respect for the pharmacy business.
I would never tell a customer- go to the MD's office and you will be treated within 10 minutes of arrival.

Have any of you had this daily nightmare?
Lol... Actually from an patients setting I come to the pharmacy 25 mins later and the script still isn't done. The doctor tells me to call the pharmacy, but all is forgiven, cause I know what the pharmacy goes through.
 
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Jan 17, 2012
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Yeah. 5+ times a day. They never mention that the MD said to go to the pharmacy right away. I just assumed they were a bit special and didn't understand that it takes time to fill a script, there are other people ahead of them waiting to get theirs filled, etc. It's been 5 minutes since you left the doc's office and you're pissed off that it's not ready? That's just too f'n bad.
 
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Let's be real it is ridiculous how long it takes to fill a script. I'm not saying it's your fault, obviously you didn't set up the system, but there is no reason for it to take as long as it does.
 

pinipig523

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Those MDs are morons.

When we fax over scripts to the pharmacy - I tell my patient to go get some food or lunch or whatever before heading to the pharmacy.
 

pezdispenser

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Well it's not a new trend because it's been happening all the time even before electronic prescriptions. Sometimes a medical assistant would call in the prescription, and right before they hung up the phone I would hear them tell the patient "it'll be ready by the time you get there". :rolleyes:
 

genesis09

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Happens all the time. For e-scribes, it can take up to 15 minutes before the arrive, and for faxes, 45 minutes to 1 hour. Also, there might be other rx ahead of them. I do try and explain this to offices but they don't always listen.
 

thephoenician88

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Thing is, if we knew these patients would be "waiters" maybe they could be churned out in 25mins. We don't know that. We see it as another script and just put it in workflow. If doctors don't know that, you should make them aware or build a relationship with them so that it stops happening.



What's posting on studentdoctorforums going to do to help?
 
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All4MyDaughter

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Not new at all. I used to hear it all the time at the VA when the patients would leave the clinic, walk down the hall and arrive at the pharmacy expecting their meds to be ready right away because "the doctor said it should only take a few minutes."
 

Digsbe

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Let's be real it is ridiculous how long it takes to fill a script. I'm not saying it's your fault, obviously you didn't set up the system, but there is no reason for it to take as long as it does.
What specifically about the typical workflow do you think causes it to take ridiculously long to fill a script?
 

Carboxide

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What specifically about the typical workflow do you think causes it to take ridiculously long to fill a script?
Yeah, definitely. It sounds like he knows a LOT about pharmacy so I'm really interested in hearing his ideas for improvement...he can probably teach us a lot! After all, he's a MEDICAL STUDENT. He automatically knows more than any pharmacist ever...you know, because if we were smart enough, we all would have been physicians!
 

Sparda29

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Let's be real it is ridiculous how long it takes to fill a script. I'm not saying it's your fault, obviously you didn't set up the system, but there is no reason for it to take as long as it does.
It doesn't take long to fill a script. But, just because you sent an e-script doesn't mean it takes priority over the other scripts already in the system. They wait on line just like all the other scripts.
 
Oct 21, 2010
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Over 12 hours (720 minutes) we fill 500 scripts, one every 86.4 seconds.

But they need to wait in line. Please view the angry pharmacist.

It really only takes 30-60 seconds to fill a script, but there are many workflow interruptions.

Not to mention, by my estimation 75% of patients wait until they are out of medication to order a refill. This places a huge burden on the system. I've tried to tell them to call it in early, only to be yelled at by their ignorance.
 

Carboxide

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Over 12 hours (720 minutes) we fill 500 scripts, one every 86.4 seconds.

But they need to wait in line. Please view the angry pharmacist.

It really only takes 30-60 seconds to fill a script, but there are many workflow interruptions.

Not to mention, by my estimation 75% of patients wait until they are out of medication to order a refill. This places a huge burden on the system. I've tried to tell them to call it in early, only to be yelled at by their ignorance.
Uh, in no universe does the entire process take 30 to 60 seconds from start to finish, even if you discount any time not waiting. Typing alone takes time, as well as billing insurance, dealing with rejects, calling for injection overrides/copay overrides for Medicaid patients, and then counting (double if it's a control) and check. If it's a refill the check is faster but for new scripts it is more time consuming if you are doing it right.
 

thephoenician88

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Uh, in no universe does the entire process take 30 to 60 seconds from start to finish, even if you discount any time not waiting. Typing alone takes time, as well as billing insurance, dealing with rejects, calling for injection overrides/copay overrides for Medicaid patients, and then counting (double if it's a control) and check. If it's a refill the check is faster but for new scripts it is more time consuming if you are doing it right.
This man can fill a script every 86 seconds, don't rain on his parade alright.

I'm surprised they hired others to work with this guy. He's so efficient the others seem unnecessary!
 
Mar 10, 2012
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I don't even entertain that crap. sometimes, they get to the pharmacy before the doctor's office calls in their script. I tell them when their medication is going to be ready based on our wait time. they either wait or come back.
 

Socrates25

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It really only takes 30-60 seconds to fill a script, but there are many workflow interruptions.

Some of those workflow obstructions are pharmacists' fault. We hear every day about how you guys want to do medication counseling, flu shots, even doing your own rx. Seems like a good chunk of you guys would rather do something BESIDES fill scripts.
 

praetorianz

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Some of those workflow obstructions are pharmacists' fault. We hear every day about how you guys want to do medication counseling, flu shots, even doing your own rx. Seems like a good chunk of you guys would rather do something BESIDES fill scripts.
Lol yeah you pharm.D's how dare you waste time doing medication counseling of all things. Ridiculous!
 

Digsbe

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Some of those workflow obstructions are pharmacists' fault. We hear every day about how you guys want to do medication counseling, flu shots, even doing your own rx. Seems like a good chunk of you guys would rather do something BESIDES fill scripts.
I've not met a retail pharmacist that argued that they should be allowed to open up a clinic and write scripts in the retail setting.

By law many states mandate that a pharmacist needs to counsel on new prescriptions and/or offer counselling on any fill.

Then again there are some pharmacists that would like to use their drug expertise to have a more clinical role in patient care.

We also hear about some physicians that want to dispense what they write for in their office.
 

thephoenician88

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Some of those workflow obstructions are pharmacists' fault. We hear every day about how you guys want to do medication counseling, flu shots, even doing your own rx. Seems like a good chunk of you guys would rather do something BESIDES fill scripts.
We would and SHOULD be doing something besides fill scripts. We should be counseling/ flu shots/ etc while ensuring prescriptions are written and prescribed correctly.

Things like filling should be done by technicians, but corporate and its budget come into play.

they're not pharmacists fault, they're pharmacists duties.

I've not met a retail pharmacist that argued that they should be allowed to open up a clinic and write scripts in the retail setting.

By law many states mandate that a pharmacist needs to counsel on new prescriptions and/or offer counselling on any fill.

Then again there are some pharmacists that would like to use their drug expertise to have a more clinical role in patient care.

We also hear about some physicians that want to dispense what they write for in their office.
physicians can start dispensing, they just have to adhere to all pharmacy laws and regulations.
 
Sep 6, 2011
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Assuming we already have all of the correct prescription, patient and insurance information, it does not take very long to fill a prescription. However, as others have pointed out, there are barriers to this.

There are site interruptions, insurance issues, prescriber errors when they happen, etc. Just because it is efaxed over doesn't mean that we get it instantly and that we don't already have several other things that are ahead of that particular prescription. That would be like saying a patient shows up at your clinic and can just walk in and be seen instantly. Not the case. I've certainly never been seen for more than 10-15 minutes at a time by a physician, but I generally spend a minimum of an hour at the clinic for a scheduled visit. Patients have to do the necessary paperwork, wait to be seen after others that were already there, etc. The visit itself COULD go very quickly if other things didn't stand in the way, just like prescriptions COULD be filled very quickly... you catch my drift.

In general, retail pharmacies are staffed at the minimum they can function on and there is more corporate emphasis on numbers and metrics than on actual patient care. I think most pharmacists would like more time to properly counsel, analyze profiles, answer questions, etc. just like physicians would probably prefer to have less rushed visits with their patients.

Edit: As already stated, I don't think any retail pharmacists would want prescribing rights or the like the way retail is run now. I think CPAs and MTM are a good idea, but they won't be happening in traditional retail pharmacy anytime soon. If that's what a pharmacist wants to pursue they will seek other ways to do it.
 

Ackj

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Happens all the time. For e-scribes, it can take up to 15 minutes before the arrive, and for faxes, 45 minutes to 1 hour. Also, there might be other rx ahead of them. I do try and explain this to offices but they don't always listen.
This really is a mystery. Why does it take so long for faxes or e-scripts to arrive? Patients will say "I saw them send it, and that was about 45 min ago." Even taking out the poor historian patients, I have been on the phone with the office, and the med assistant will say "okay, it's transmitting now..." and it won't show up for a half hour or more.

We would and SHOULD be doing something besides fill scripts. We should be counseling/ flu shots/ etc while ensuring prescriptions are written and prescribed correctly.

Things like filling should be done by technicians, but corporate and its budget come into play.

they're not pharmacists fault, they're pharmacists duties.
Could you imagine if there were corporate physician offices, with staffing budgets that squeezed them? They'd have to take the heights, weights, bp, pull charts, call in scripts, collect the copay, etc. since there weren't enough nursing or med assistant hours to cover the administrative duties that go along with the clinical ones. So for all the docs who are wondering what eats up all our time, think about running your office or clinic while you are the only employee in the building.
 

Carboxide

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Some of those workflow obstructions are pharmacists' fault. We hear every day about how you guys want to do medication counseling, flu shots, even doing your own rx. Seems like a good chunk of you guys would rather do something BESIDES fill scripts.
Hahah. You're right, why would we want to do medication counseling?? That's us just being uppity. After all, we definitely don't even know a LITTLE more about drugs than you, you big bad smarty pants physician! :smuggrin:
 

MountainPharmD

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Ok enough is enough- I thought maybe it was one or 2 MD's but on a daily basis- I would say on average at least 5 to 10 times a day we have customers coming to the pharmacy- either in store or drive thru to pick up their meds. Ok- their meds are not quite ready and this is the typical response from the customer: My Doctor said he "emailed" the prescriptions and told me to come right over. We than ask how long ago? The customer replies: I just left the MD's office 10 minutes ago..."

Now if MD's think they can simply escribe a script and tell the customer go head over to the pharmacy right now and it will be ready than truly MD's have lost respect for the pharmacy business.
I would never tell a customer- go to the MD's office and you will be treated within 10 minutes of arrival.

Have any of you had this daily nightmare?
You are just now noticing this? Man that has been going on for years! Same thing with the faxes. My doctor faxed/emailed the rx over 5 seconds ago why is it not ready? My last retail gig was accross from a doc in the box. Happened 50 times a day.
 

MountainPharmD

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Let's be real it is ridiculous how long it takes to fill a script. I'm not saying it's your fault, obviously you didn't set up the system, but there is no reason for it to take as long as it does.
Oh how about the other 100 scripts faxed in every hour of the day and the 20 flu shots that have to be done at the same time all the while getting yelled at by your idiot patient who you told to come right over since it doesn't take long to fill a script.

While we are at it why when I schedule an appointment 6 months in advance am I still sitting in the waiting room 45 minutes after it started? I mean come on all you do is write prescriptions how long does that take?
 
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Carboxide

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Oh how about the other 100 scripts faxed in every hour of the day and the 20 flu shots that have to be done at the same time all the while getting yelled at by your idiot patient who you told to come right over since it doesn't take long to fill a script.

While we are at it why when I schedule an appointment 6 months in advance am I still sitting in the waiting room 45 minutes after it started? I mean come on all you do is write prescriptions how long does that take?
Yeah, they don't even take your BP themselves anymore, they literally just have to give you what you want so you can leave! "Look doc, I have a cough, give me a z-pak." How hard is it to say okay and do what they want? It's not like anything else is needed or important or anything...

Seems like a lot of the wait time in doctors offices is created by docs. You can fix that if you just stop trying to do stuff you aren't good at, right? Why do you want to talk about their other conditions anyways? Heart problems, refer to cardiologist! Done!
 

rxlea

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Oh no. BPs are on the rise up in herrr

Don't get Mountain started :smuggrin:
 

eagles22

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To be fair it does only take 1 minute to fill an rx. Now if people want you to bill their insurance, check for drug interactions, make sure the right pills are in the bottle, etc. then it takes a bit longer.
 
Jan 17, 2012
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Some of those workflow obstructions are pharmacists' fault. We hear every day about how you guys want to do medication counseling, flu shots, even doing your own rx. Seems like a good chunk of you guys would rather do something BESIDES fill scripts.
I'm pretty sure every time our pharmacists go out to give a flu shot they sigh lol. Last month they averaged nearly 100 flu shots a day.

As for counseling, it's not like the pharmacist is waving down patients and asking them if they could use some counseling. Give me a break man. You probably won't ever hear about it, but when you write a script in the future and make a mistake on the dosing, you can thank the pharmacist for saving your ass.

Doing their own rx? Wow. Even if they did, the longest "workflow obstruction" that would cause is 1-5 minutes.

You're way off the mark. Way to generalize.
 

Sparda29

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Oh how about the other 100 scripts faxed in every hour of the day and the 20 flu shots that have to be done at the same time all the while getting yelled at by your idiot patient who you told to come right over since it doesn't take long to fill a script.

While we are at it why when I schedule an appointment 6 months in advance am I still sitting in the waiting room 45 minutes after it started? I mean come on all you do is write prescriptions how long does that take?
The worst is how after the 1 hour in the waiting room, the next 20 minutes waiting in the exam room, having all the tests and bloodwork done by the PA/medical assistant, doc comes in and rushes through the exam, and is out of there in usually less than a minute.
 

WVUPharm2007

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Itd be cool if pharmacists just filled scripts all day with few interruptions and could just stop what they are doing to full a script in a few minutes, but that's not the case.

Well except for me. I actually get that luxury, as do my patients. You poor, poor day shift people.

I actually spent about 25 minutes tonight talking to a prison guard about his new diabetes diagnosis. His physician spent about 3 minutes with him before tossing some metformin at him and running off. My pharmacy practice is like the video in school. Just you, the patient....nobody in the drive thru...no phone ringing. I taught him about food, what insulin does, how his body is resisting it...and so on. Its rather fulfilling, actually. And I don't have to come back to work until next week. Last day! Yay!

So that's the answer. Tell them to come in at 2 AM. I will give them the fastest, most comprehensive, and focused pharmacy service of their lives.
 

joetrisman

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Itd be cool if pharmacists just filled scripts all day with few interruptions and could just stop what they are doing to full a script in a few minutes, but that's not the case.

Well except for me. I actually get that luxury, as do my patients. You poor, poor day shift people.

I actually spent about 25 minutes tonight talking to a prison guard about his new diabetes diagnosis. His physician spent about 3 minutes with him before tossing some metformin at him and running off. My pharmacy practice is like the video in school. Just you, the patient....nobody in the drive thru...no phone ringing. I taught him about food, what insulin does, how his body is resisting it...and so on. Its rather fulfilling, actually. And I don't have to come back to work until next week. Last day! Yay!

So that's the answer. Tell them to come in at 2 AM. I will give them the fastest, most comprehensive, and focused pharmacy service of their lives.
Living the dream Mikey, living the dream.
 

Socrates25

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Wow I really hit a nerve in here! :laugh:

I'm simply pointing out the double speak going on here:

1. Pharmacists complain they have too many interruptions
2. Pharmacists are actually responsible for creating some (not all) of those interruptions of their own free will.

Somebody tried to imply above that giving vaccinations was not something pharmacists wanted to do -- as if it was being forced on you guys by corporate guys in suits at Walgreens. Lets not play coy now -- we all know that the major pharmacy organizations which are run by PHARMACISTS have been pushing for a long time to do shots.

You guys arent alone in this -- hell doctors do the same thing when we complain about not having more than 5 minutes per patient yet we purposefully try to schedule 50 patients a day.
 

thephoenician88

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Itd be cool if pharmacists just filled scripts all day with few interruptions and could just stop what they are doing to full a script in a few minutes, but that's not the case.
no it wouldn't, that's what pharmacy used to be and it sucked!
 

WVUPharm2007

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Wow I really hit a nerve in here! :laugh:

I'm simply pointing out the double speak going on here:

1. Pharmacists complain they have too many interruptions
2. Pharmacists are actually responsible for creating some (not all) of those interruptions of their own free will.

Somebody tried to imply above that giving vaccinations was not something pharmacists wanted to do -- as if it was being forced on you guys by corporate guys in suits at Walgreens. Lets not play coy now -- we all know that the major pharmacy organizations which are run by PHARMACISTS have been pushing for a long time to do shots.

You guys arent alone in this -- hell doctors do the same thing when we complain about not having more than 5 minutes per patient yet we purposefully try to schedule 50 patients a day.


You have to understand that there is no such thing as a "pharmacist metabrain" that decides it wants to give immunizations and, thus, applies to all pharmacist. Different people in different settings will have different opinions on the matter. I would have assumed this would have went without saying, but I guess not.

See, the major pharmacy organizations are run by academics and shills for retail pharmacy corporations. Of course those two types of people want pharmacists to do more. It legitimizes academics (the existence of the PharmD) and brings profit. Your front line druggist at Walgreens has no say in any of this. Most of those guys hate immunizations except in the clinic setting where they can concentrate on doing it. It makes their lives rather hectic.

Also, didn't they tell you to stop posting on this forum being that you come along and troll it like once a year? I can almost set a watch to it.
 

pezdispenser

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Itd be cool if pharmacists just filled scripts all day with few interruptions and could just stop what they are doing to full a script in a few minutes, but that's not the case.
Actually that sounds like mail order. Dispensing and consultation are separate so each can concentrate on their job. I'm on the dispensing side, so I have no patient contact and I love it. Other people might like to talk to patients, but are afraid of making dispensing errors, so put them in consultation and they can talk all day.
 

eagles22

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Wow I really hit a nerve in here! :laugh:

I'm simply pointing out the double speak going on here:

1. Pharmacists complain they have too many interruptions
2. Pharmacists are actually responsible for creating some (not all) of those interruptions of their own free will.

Somebody tried to imply above that giving vaccinations was not something pharmacists wanted to do -- as if it was being forced on you guys by corporate guys in suits at Walgreens. Lets not play coy now -- we all know that the major pharmacy organizations which are run by PHARMACISTS have been pushing for a long time to do shots.

You guys arent alone in this -- hell doctors do the same thing when we complain about not having more than 5 minutes per patient yet we purposefully try to schedule 50 patients a day.
Not really people complaining about the interruptions. Pharmacists go to school for a long time and want to use their knowledge to help out people. It's about lack of time and staffing which makes these interruptions so noticeable. Pharmacists practice pharmacy (something that I think you know very little about). Pharmacy practice includes counseling, immunizations, verifying, etc.

Just like physicians can't decide to only take a history and not do a physical exam because the practice of (good) medicine requires both, the practice of good pharmacy requires pharmacists to do more than count and pour.

And your argument about small groups of pharmacists pushing for things that take more time is akin to mentioning how some doctors don't want you to vaccinate your children. A few do not necessarily represent the views of the whole.
 

naseuy

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Itd be cool if pharmacists just filled scripts all day with few interruptions and could just stop what they are doing to full a script in a few minutes, but that's not the case.

Well except for me. I actually get that luxury, as do my patients. You poor, poor day shift people.

I actually spent about 25 minutes tonight talking to a prison guard about his new diabetes diagnosis. His physician spent about 3 minutes with him before tossing some metformin at him and running off. My pharmacy practice is like the video in school. Just you, the patient....nobody in the drive thru...no phone ringing. I taught him about food, what insulin does, how his body is resisting it...and so on. Its rather fulfilling, actually. And I don't have to come back to work until next week. Last day! Yay!

So that's the answer. Tell them to come in at 2 AM. I will give them the fastest, most comprehensive, and focused pharmacy service of their lives.
Starting to work nights in about a week. Looking forward to it :D
 

genesis09

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This really is a mystery. Why does it take so long for faxes or e-scripts to arrive? Patients will say "I saw them send it, and that was about 45 min ago." Even taking out the poor historian patients, I have been on the phone with the office, and the med assistant will say "okay, it's transmitting now..." and it won't show up for a half hour or more.

.
E-scribes do not immediately arrive at the pharmacy. They go to a central server. The pharmacy then pulls the rx every so often.
 
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You have to understand that there is no such thing as a "pharmacist metabrain" that decides it wants to give immunizations and, thus, applies to all pharmacist. Different people in different settings will have different opinions on the matter. I would have assumed this would have went without saying, but I guess not.
Well said. This is how I wanted to reply to Socrates25, but trying to explain it to him seemed like a waste of time since this shouldn't have to be explained in the first place.
 

Socrates25

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You have to understand that there is no such thing as a "pharmacist metabrain" that decides it wants to give immunizations and, thus, applies to all pharmacist. Different people in different settings will have different opinions on the matter. I would have assumed this would have went without saying, but I guess not.
Oh right. You know I hear there are some doctors out there who oppose vaccines. Therefore, the AAP's position statement on the importance of vaccination can NOT be construed to represent a sizable percentage or a majority of pediatricians. Silly me. :rolleyes:

Let's stop being disingenuous. You and I both know that if the pharmacy organizations conducted a poll of its membership, including retail pharmacists, that the majority, probably the VAST majority would agree that pharmacists should be able to give vaccinations and should not have that privilege taken away from them.
 

Digsbe

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Oh right. You know I hear there are some doctors out there who oppose vaccines. Therefore, the AAP's position statement on the importance of vaccination can NOT be construed to represent a sizable percentage or a majority of pediatricians. Silly me. :rolleyes:

Let's stop being disingenuous. You and I both know that if the pharmacy organizations conducted a poll of its membership, including retail pharmacists, that the majority, probably the VAST majority would agree that pharmacists should be able to give vaccinations and should not have that privilege taken away from them.
I think the keyword here is "should."

Do most pharmacists have the training and competency to provide vaccination services? Absolutely.

Do all pharmacists want to have to give vaccinations at their job? No.
 
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naseuy

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Apr 22, 2007
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I do not think that many pharmacists are necessarily against giving vaccinations. The problem is that they are not getting compensated for this additional service in the retail chain setting. It has become another metric that the chains expect their pharmacists to meet. More work without additional compensation (or staffing) is not something that any employee would cheer for.

I do not complain about workflow interruptions, I complain about inpatient people. You are not at a burger joint, do you want it fast, or do you want it right?
 

eagles22

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Nov 29, 2010
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Oh right. You know I hear there are some doctors out there who oppose vaccines. Therefore, the AAP's position statement on the importance of vaccination can NOT be construed to represent a sizable percentage or a majority of pediatricians. Silly me. :rolleyes:

Let's stop being disingenuous. You and I both know that if the pharmacy organizations conducted a poll of its membership, including retail pharmacists, that the majority, probably the VAST majority would agree that pharmacists should be able to give vaccinations and should not have that privilege taken away from them.
What are you trying to accomplish other than proving yourself to be an a-hole? Trying to get in an e-pissing contest? Most attendings I know have better **** to do than what you're up to. Again, you have zero grasp of how a pharmacy works or how pharmacy is practiced in this country.
 

Angela1234

Still Looking for Work
Dec 30, 2012
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Pharmacist
Wow I really hit a nerve in here! :laugh:

I'm simply pointing out the double speak going on here:

1. Pharmacists complain they have too many interruptions
2. Pharmacists are actually responsible for creating some (not all) of those interruptions of their own free will.

Somebody tried to imply above that giving vaccinations was not something pharmacists wanted to do -- as if it was being forced on you guys by corporate guys in suits at Walgreens. Lets not play coy now -- we all know that the major pharmacy organizations which are run by PHARMACISTS have been pushing for a long time to do shots.

You guys arent alone in this -- hell doctors do the same thing when we complain about not having more than 5 minutes per patient yet we purposefully try to schedule 50 patients a day.
No, most of us don't create interruptions of our own free will. In fact, I would not work retail at all if given a choice. A lot of the pharmacies of a certain company are understaffed. There is only one of us the entire day for 14 hours for 400 rx's, answering doctor calls, patient questions, counseling, helping our co-workers, and doing vaccinations. Yes, pharmacists run these companies and they have us do the immunizations because it means more money for them, not because all the pharmacists agree doing them under those circumstances. Most pharmacists agree with being able to do vaccinations, they probably don't want to do them in that awful environment. Hurrying to do vaccinations isn't a safe thing to do, and it puts us behind even more. The worst is when nasty customers try to hurry you along when you have needles in your hand.
 

Angela1234

Still Looking for Work
Dec 30, 2012
309
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Yes, 400 rx a day with me being the only pharmacist there. Sometimes 300 rx/day if it's a slow day, and I am not kidding. The company is so inept that they pile on the prescriptions from the day before that should have been done then because we are so understaffed. What ends up happening is that the pharmacy manager who usually works at that store comes in on her day off and doesn't get paid for it for a few hours, and that's how they get free labor. How would you feel if you were told when you dropped prescriptions off that there's no guarantee that they would even be done that day? They must lose tons of customers.