zeppelinpage4

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May 17, 2009
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I just spoke with my adviser and plan to register hopefully in two weeks or so.

I'll be a sophomore next year and right now I plan on taking.

Genetics
Physics I
Physics lab
Orgo I
Orgo lab
U.S. History (for gen ed requirement)

Does this seem reasonable? I was always told never to take more than two science at the same time but he said this was typical.

Also the physics lab is two semesters, but the orgo lab is only one semester so I could take the Orgo lab my second semester. However I want to get it out of the way.

My other issue is deciding whether to take analytical physics or general physics. I'm currently a bio major but the analytical physics courses will leave me the option to switch to biochem, or take up a chem minor if I ever want to ( I haven't decided if I want to go that route or not as of yet).

Right now one of the more well liked professors is teaching the analytical class, while the less favored professor is teaching general physics.

I'd just like some advice on which physics to take and if it's ok with the heavy course load I plan on taking.

Thanks
 

BioBA

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May 27, 2009
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Well, it cetainly depends on your university, but I took basically the same courseload my sophmore year... Genetics, Phys w/ lab, Orgo w/ lab, U.S History. I will tell you that I was at the library almost every day for hours. It was tough, but you can definately do it. I mean if you can't handle a few hard classes at once (I'm sure you can, but..), how are you going to handle med school...or any other hard challenge for that matter?
 
Dec 23, 2009
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I just spoke with my adviser and plan to register hopefully in two weeks or so.

I'll be a sophomore next year and right now I plan on taking.

Genetics
Physics I
Physics lab
Orgo I
Orgo lab
U.S. History (for gen ed requirement)

Does this seem reasonable? I was always told never to take more than two science at the same time but he said this was typical.

Also the physics lab is two semesters, but the orgo lab is only one semester so I could take the Orgo lab my second semester. However I want to get it out of the way.

My other issue is deciding whether to take analytical physics or general physics. I'm currently a bio major but the analytical physics courses will leave me the option to switch to biochem, or take up a chem minor if I ever want to ( I haven't decided if I want to go that route or not as of yet).

Right now one of the more well liked professors is teaching the analytical class, while the less favored professor is teaching general physics.

I'd just like some advice on which physics to take and if it's ok with the heavy course load I plan on taking.

Thanks
In all honesty, the course load does not seem particularly difficult. I'd even throw in another course if you want to, something FUN!

whats the difference between analytical and general physics? or do you mean calc-based and algebra physics?
 

zeppelinpage4

7+ Year Member
May 17, 2009
1,299
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Medical Student
Well, it cetainly depends on your university, but I took basically the same courseload my sophmore year... Genetics, Phys w/ lab, Orgo w/ lab, U.S History. I will tell you that I was at the library almost every day for hours. It was tough, but you can definately do it. I mean if you can't handle a few hard classes at once (I'm sure you can, but..), how are you going to handle med school...or any other hard challenge for that matter?
Thanks, you make a very good point, i've done reasonably well so far. My first semester I had to take calc,chem,bio, bio lab and english and I did well in all of them.

So I think i'll stick with this course load, I just wanted to see if others had taken this sort of course load in their universities. My only worry is that I might have little to no time for clubs or ECs.

Were you able to fit in time for volunteering and clubs during that semester also?


In all honesty, the course load does not seem particularly difficult. I'd even throw in another course if you want to, something FUN!

whats the difference between analytical and general physics? or do you mean calc-based and algebra physics?
Haha I wouldn't mind another non-science class in there.:D

Yeah, one is calc-based and the other is algebra based.

These are the description for the two.

Algebra-based:
An introduction to the concepts and laws of physics with applications to biological systems; course includes mechanics, thermodynamics, wave properties, and sound.

Calc-based:
An analytical, calculus-based treatment of kinematics, Newton's laws, kinetic and potential energy, friction, linear momentum, angular momentum, rotational dynamics, gravitational physics, and simple harmonic motion.

Both seem interesting, one is REAL physics and the other might incorporate biology which appeals to me. Truth be told, the calc-based one looks quite a bit more challenging but the algebra physics has a really tough professor.

BTW can calculus physics hurt me on the MCAT? I know the MCAT asks algebra based physics questions, so I don't know if learning calculus based physics will throw me off.
 
Last edited:
Dec 23, 2009
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Thanks, you make a very good point, i've done reasonably well so far. My first semester I had to take calc,chem,bio, bio lab and english and I did well in all of them.

So I think i'll stick with this course load, I just wanted to see if others had taken this sort of course load in their universities. My only worry is that I might have little to no time for clubs or ECs.

Were you able to fit in time for volunteering and clubs during that semester also?




Haha I wouldn't mind another non-science class in there.:D

Yeah, one is calc-based and the other is algebra based.

These are the description for the two.

Algebra-based:
An introduction to the concepts and laws of physics with applications to biological systems; course includes mechanics, thermodynamics, wave properties, and sound.

Calc-based:
An analytical, calculus-based treatment of kinematics, Newton's laws, kinetic and potential energy, friction, linear momentum, angular momentum, rotational dynamics, gravitational physics, and simple harmonic motion.

Both seem interesting, one is REAL physics and the other might incorporate biology which appeals to me. Truth be told, the calc-based one looks quite a bit more challenging but the algebra physics has a really tough professor.

BTW can calculus physics hurt me on the MCAT? I know the MCAT asks algebra based physics questions, so I don't know if learning calculus based physics will throw me off.

Which one you take will depend on your major/calc-background. But, theres nothing wrong with the taking the analytical or the algebra one. I just hope the algebra one doesnt water down the material because it focuses on bio systems. And, taking the algebra-based physics wont hurt you because I think you learn to think more critically about the physics problems and get to see where the laws really come from. And, the algebra is just a simpler case of the problems where you need calculus, so it should be the same kind of thing. So, take which one you want?



And, about ECS, I was taking 5 courses, and I had two part-time jobs and did like 2 clubs and a few hours of comm serv. every week. So, really, this should be ok. It's good that at least genetics doesnt have lab! anyway, good luck man!
 

naijaboi

MS0
Nov 20, 2009
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It might or might not be okay. You know yourself and how much you can handle. If you are comfortable with three hard science course and two time consuming laboratories then it is okay.

Myself, I am never a glutton for punishment - and I have nothing to prove. Less class and study time = more time for ECs and fun and good grades and ultimately a well-rounded applicant. I will make my course load a bit easier and stagger them throughout my entire academic career. I also take similar courses together - for example, genetics and biochemistry or molecular biology. That way I reduce my study time greatly.

Physics is difficult, so is organic chemistry. The only way to excel in these classes is to do all the practice problems - and this is very time consuming. I would not take both at the same time, but that is my own opinion.
 

zeppelinpage4

7+ Year Member
May 17, 2009
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^Thanks for the input, were you able to finished all you courses in time for the MCAT? Do you think you learned the material better this way as well?
I hope to take mine the beginning of junior year, so unfortunately I'm a little rushed.

Which one you take will depend on your major/calc-background. But, theres nothing wrong with the taking the analytical or the algebra one. I just hope the algebra one doesnt water down the material because it focuses on bio systems. And, taking the algebra-based physics wont hurt you because I think you learn to think more critically about the physics problems and get to see where the laws really come from. And, the algebra is just a simpler case of the problems where you need calculus, so it should be the same kind of thing. So, take which one you want?



And, about ECS, I was taking 5 courses, and I had two part-time jobs and did like 2 clubs and a few hours of comm serv. every week. So, really, this should be ok. It's good that at least genetics doesn't have lab! anyway, good luck man!
Thank you. :luck:

I think they just threw in the bio part to attract the bio majors/pre-meds, so hopefully it will not be as bio heavy as I think. Looks like I'm set with both classes however, so ATM I think i'll go with the one that fits my schedule best.
Calc-based physics would have allowed me to go to biochem but I'm quite happy with a bio major alone. Now to pick up on those ECs.:smuggrin: