Is this the standard for pain job and pay?

changeofheart2016

Full Member
Apr 3, 2016
37
26
96
  1. Resident [Any Field]
Incoming fellow and was wondering if job postings like this is the standard for pain jobs in terms of patient volume and pay/salary amount and structure:

Office Hours: Monday through Friday, 9-5 pm, 2 weekend days/month

Patient Volume: 20 - 25 patients/day

Payor Mix: 60% major health insurance, 30% medicare, 10% personal injury/ workers compensation. NO Medicaid or cash patients seeking medications

Competitive Base Salary
Bonuses & Incentives: 20% of physician collections after deducting salary and 55% expenses of running practice (i.e. if physician generates 1,000,000 on an annual basis: 1,000,000 – 300,000 (salary) – 55% expense x 20% = $63,000 bonus)

Benefits include: Paid Malpractice, MCME, Vacations, Holidays, Group Medical & Dental. • Willing to increase productivity from 20% first year to 25% second year and 30% third year and possible shares in the ambulatory surgery center in the future
 

SSdoc33

Full Member
10+ Year Member
Apr 23, 2007
9,224
3,306
276
  1. Attending Physician
there is no standard, but that's not awful, depending on where you live. a lot has to do with how much you trust the people there and the possibility of ancillary ASC revenue
 
About the Ads

clubdeac

Full Member
10+ Year Member
Aug 16, 2007
4,174
1,271
276
  1. Attending Physician
So you pay 55% of all overhead however you only get to keep 20% of what's left over?? That's ridiculous. You should be keeping 100% of what's left over. How many other physicians are in this practice? And why do they get to keep 80% of your bonus?
 
  • Like
Reactions: 1 users
Nov 21, 1998
10,806
4,859
376
Over the rainbow
  1. Attending Physician
So you pay 55% of all overhead however you only get to keep 20% of what's left over?? That's ridiculous. You should be keeping 100% of what's left over. How many other physicians are in this practice? And why do they get to keep 80% of your bonus?

What if the owner is a hospital? How do you do the split then?
 

AdminPatient

Full Member
May 9, 2020
17
17
11
  1. Non-Student
Incoming fellow and was wondering if job postings like this is the standard for pain jobs in terms of patient volume and pay/salary amount and structure:

Office Hours: Monday through Friday, 9-5 pm, 2 weekend days/month

Patient Volume: 20 - 25 patients/day

Payor Mix: 60% major health insurance, 30% medicare, 10% personal injury/ workers compensation. NO Medicaid or cash patients seeking medications

Competitive Base Salary
Bonuses & Incentives: 20% of physician collections after deducting salary and 55% expenses of running practice (i.e. if physician generates 1,000,000 on an annual basis: 1,000,000 – 300,000 (salary) – 55% expense x 20% = $63,000 bonus)

Benefits include: Paid Malpractice, MCME, Vacations, Holidays, Group Medical & Dental. • Willing to increase productivity from 20% first year to 25% second year and 30% third year and possible shares in the ambulatory surgery center in the future


what is included in your overheard allocation? Are things like rent, staff costs, rev cycle fees spread equally across the group of docs or is it more sophisticated than that? Are there PAs/APCs in the picture? If you are getting a piece of their incident to billing?
 

MikeMerk-MtS

Full Member
5+ Year Member
Jan 14, 2015
128
86
156
  1. Resident [Any Field]
It really depends if your bonus is set to an unreachable minimum. If you’re ok with not hitting that bonus for a few years and you’re ok with $300k plus those benefits then it’s fine. It’s just hard to say because base and take home can be totally different depending on your productivity.
 

rocsux

Full Member
2+ Year Member
Jul 15, 2017
25
1
76
could someone please explain the payor mix part ( Payor Mix: 60% major health insurance, 30% medicare, 10% personal injury/ workers compensation. NO Medicaid or cash patients seeking medications )? is that a good mix or bad? I understand the more major health insurance the better and the less medicare and medicaid the better, however isn't more cash patients also better? I think WC also pays pretty well right?
 

jsaul

Member
15+ Year Member
Sep 27, 2005
1,151
235
316
paying another doctor's benefits is an expensive venture nowadays. For example here, the employer pays for malpractice insurance, health and dental insurance and pays for the employee's time off. As a solo practitioner myself all of that costs a lot of money which is separate from the employee doc's salary. Depending on the situation and location all of that could be worth monetarily anywhere from 40,000-80000 dollars at least a year. often the new grad does not consider that in the equation
 
  • Like
Reactions: 3 users

SommeRiver

Membership Revoked
Removed
Account on Hold
2+ Year Member
Apr 20, 2018
2,168
1,648
126
  1. Attending Physician
paying another doctor's benefits is an expensive venture nowadays. For example here, the employer pays for malpractice insurance, health and dental insurance and pays for the employee's time off. As a solo practitioner myself all of that costs a lot of money which is separate from the employee doc's salary. Depending on the situation and location all of that could be worth monetarily anywhere from 40,000-80000 dollars at least a year. often the new grad does not consider that in the equation

This is something most ppl do not understand, and those costs add up pretty quickly.
 
  • Like
Reactions: 1 user

Ducttape

SDN Lifetime Donor
7+ Year Member
Oct 7, 2011
10,835
3,580
226
  1. Attending Physician
could someone please explain the payor mix part ( Payor Mix: 60% major health insurance, 30% medicare, 10% personal injury/ workers compensation. NO Medicaid or cash patients seeking medications )? is that a good mix or bad? I understand the more major health insurance the better and the less medicare and medicaid the better, however isn't more cash patients also better? I think WC also pays pretty well right?
Good.
Low PI/WC while can pay well is actually good. while you do get money... much less of a headache. and would definitely trade that for no cash pay patients.
No Medicaid is really good.
 
About the Ads

Your message may be considered spam for the following reasons:

  1. Your new thread title is very short, and likely is unhelpful.
  2. Your reply is very short and likely does not add anything to the thread.
  3. Your reply is very long and likely does not add anything to the thread.
  4. It is very likely that it does not need any further discussion and thus bumping it serves no purpose.
  5. Your message is mostly quotes or spoilers.
  6. Your reply has occurred very quickly after a previous reply and likely does not add anything to the thread.
  7. This thread is locked.