It might be better not to major in bio for the mcats and applying to med school?

It it really worth having a science as a major?

  • No!, It would be better to major in Art, have a 4.0 gpa, study for the mcat all 4 years

    Votes: 12 44.4%
  • Yes!, I think my degree in Bio has helped me alot on the mcats (especially VR!)

    Votes: 3 11.1%
  • You think I should be studying right now instead of making this poll

    Votes: 9 33.3%
  • undecided

    Votes: 3 11.1%

  • Total voters
    27

Topper Harley

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I feel I might have been better off being an art or history major, (i am bio) getting a 4.0 gpa and "silently" study for the mcats all 4 years of my undergrad and shooting for a 40 or something. Honestly, I seem to have trouble reading some of these kaplan humanity passages, and i suspect its from years of getting good/comfortable with reading science text books. And not enough time reading things like:

"From the outset of his dramatic poem Samson Agonisties, John Milton establishes and expands upon a hero/antihero dichotomy that has its roots in the Book of Judges. Samson is the epic hero."

does this test how good of a doctor i will be?

Sorry about the complaining, but i needed to vent a bit.
 

Shrike

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Aw, screw MCAT performance. (We know that the correlation between biology taken in school, aka majoring in the subject, and performance on the MCAT, even on the bio sciences section, is negative, but we do not know that this is a causal relationship. Everyone who talks about this oversimpifies the issue; you scientists should know better. Still, it sure feels to most of us, and apparently to the pollster at this point, that those nine semesters of biology are not helping you on the biggest roadblock you're going to encounter until the boards. But I digress.)

How about all the other reasons to major in something else?

- If it's what you enjoy, you'll tend to have a happpier life.

- If it's what you enjoy, you'll tend to get better grades.

- With fewer premeds around, there will not be so much stress, and you'll have an even happier life.

- With fewer premeds around, there will probably be less grade competition.

- Maybe you'll find that there's something you like better than medicine if you take classes in a lot of things. I know, inconceivable for most of you, but humor us.

- With a varied background, you might wind up in a better position to get a non-medical job if you eventually decide, or the MCAT or your GPA or the interview procedure decides for you, that med school is not for you. Scary to contemplate, but don't forget that nearly two thirds of MCAT takers never go to medical school.

- If you come to medicine after having varied your background, you may be more comfortable with your decision because you'll feel like you considered other things (even if it's not true, but it probably will be).

- If you come to medicine with a nontraditional background, the medical schools might think that you have considered other things, and that they should be more comfortable with your eventual commitment to medicine. (You have to spin this the right way in your essays and interviews, though.)

- You might wind up a more interesting person, and you'll probably be more fun at cocktail parties.

- You may have more opportunity to get some wildness out of your system -- wildness that will not serve you well once you get to medical school.

- The guys/girls are cuter (on average -- don't yell at me) and more fun during their college years, if perhaps not so bright (not so much yelling about that claim).​

I've always thought that those premed advisors who track all the freshmen who say they want to be doctors into biology are doing those poor impressionable kids (think back to when you were doing up your schedule for the fall of your freshman year) a tremendous disservice. Sure, some of them will be best off in biology, but all of them? I don't buy it.

Life is not a race. If it took another year to get the science prereqs in, would that be so bad? And it probably wouldn't, if you planned intelligently, and along the way a lot of students would have fun, grow up, and probably even make themselves more attractive to med schools (mostly by getting better grades).

Incidentally, studying all four years for the MCAT will not be necessary (part of the first poll option), but that's another thread.

OK, end of rant. Y'all bio geeks can have the wheel again; I'm going to finish my coffee (which you can tell I need).

Shrike
math and economics majors, physics minor, but then I still don't know what I'm going to be when I grow up and I'm almost middle aged (or so Q tells me)
 

Phil Anthropist

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If I could do everything over again, I would not major in Biology for many reasons Shrike described. I'm taking the MCAT in August (most likely) and none of my extra science courses outside of the prereqs taught me anything that I couldn't learn from review books. Plant Physiology? Developmental Biology? Evolutionary Biology? Some interesting courses, but worth missing out on attractive females, less stress, more interesting people (sorry fellow premeds, but we all know that premed courses have plenty of uptight-uber-neurotic-arrogrant-spoiled-buttwipes), etc.? No way. I don't know what I'd major in...perhaps music, math, theology, psychology or philosophy...I took a few courses in each of these fields, but I never had the opportunity to study these courses in the depth I desired. Hindsight's always 20/20
 

crys20

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I started my freshman year as a psych major because I thought I liked psych. After year one not only did I realize I was going to have to take so many science classes to build back by science GPA that I should be a bio major too but that I also loved biology. So I was a double major for awhile, then I realized I didn't like psych and for the small, small benefits being a double major would give me it wasn't worth the time and extra effort for classes I didn't even really care for.

But yes, all to say there are many who major in bio just because they enjoy the science of it! Most of my friends within the major are zoology or pre-vet types. I agree that I cannot stand most premeds :)
 

TwoLegacies

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Phil Anthropist said:
If I could do everything over again, I would not major in Biology for many reasons Shrike described. I'm taking the MCAT in August (most likely) and none of my extra science courses outside of the prereqs taught me anything that I couldn't learn from review books. Plant Physiology? Developmental Biology? Evolutionary Biology? Some interesting courses, but worth missing out on attractive females, less stress, more interesting people (sorry fellow premeds, but we all know that premed courses have plenty of uptight-uber-neurotic-arrogrant-spoiled-buttwipes), etc.? No way. I don't know what I'd major in...perhaps music, math, theology, psychology or philosophy...I took a few courses in each of these fields, but I never had the opportunity to study these courses in the depth I desired. Hindsight's always 20/20
Don't worry about it. There are buttwipes in every category. I was a psych major... in there, we just have lazy buttwipes. I feel like it depends more on what university you went to.

It WAS nice to learn about a subject that was really interesting. But just because you major in something other than biology doesn't mean you have the time or the motivation to study for the MCAT in addition to your classes. My roommate was a visual arts major and also one of the busiest people I knew in undergrad.
 

OSUdoc08

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You learn what you need to learn with your med school prerequisites. It is better to do an easier major to get a better GPA.

Ecology and Invertebrate Anatomy and all of that other junk will not help.
 

Phil Anthropist

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TwoLegacies-

Oh don't get me wrong, there ARE buttwipes everywhere. I just don't like the particular breed of premed buttwipes. :D My roommate was an education major (history minor). I NEVER saw him study for more than 30 min. straight...EVER (and he still managed Magna cum Laude). But his laziness didn't bother me nearly as much as some of my fellow premeds that would go around boasting to struggling premeds that "it's not hard to get a 3.5" and "organic chemistry is easy" (the class means for tests in my o-chem classes ranged from 40-60 in organic).

Compared to my premed prereqs, my Abnormal Psych class was packed with drop dead gorgeous honeys.

And I agree, some of the hardest workers I know majored in fields that you may not expect, Art History and Music. Sometimes people don't appreciate how difficult those fields can be. I'm a huge classical music fan and I think you have to be a genius to understand musical theory at that level. I don't mean to say that it would be a walk in the park, but I do think my time would have been more enjoyable as an undergrad as a premed music major than a premed bio major.