DrWBD

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abolt18

I regret nothing. The end.
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I hope they succeed rapidly.
 
Aug 3, 2013
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Honestly, I read the claim and other news related against it and it's absolutely pointless and will be thrown out before lawyers even have a chance to present it. It's a standard contract case. You need liscenscure to practice medicine and the AOA is one of many licencing bodies in the USA. It sounds like these doctors had their licence from the MD bodies (FACS, etc.) and now want their money back from the AOA. It doesn't work like that lol. If you were licensed by the AOA, you pay the fee. That's how it works. If you already had a lisence and did'n't need the AOA yet still paid for it that's sortof your fault for not knowing the ruls in your state regarding which accredited body's licence was necessary/sufficient to practice in that state. The AOA doesn't force anyone to do anything.
 

NurWollen

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Honestly, I read the claim and other news related against it and it's absolutely pointless and will be thrown out before lawyers even have a chance to present it. It's a standard contract case. You need liscenscure to practice medicine and the AOA is one of many licencing bodies in the USA. It sounds like these doctors had their licence from the MD bodies (FACS, etc.) and now want their money back from the AOA. It doesn't work like that lol. If you were licensed by the AOA, you pay the fee. That's how it works. If you already had a lisence and did'n't need the AOA yet still paid for it that's sortof your fault for not knowing the ruls in your state regarding which accredited body's licence was necessary/sufficient to practice in that state. The AOA doesn't force anyone to do anything.
Sorry, but that's not really correct.

The AOA doesn't license anybody. Neither do speciality organizations like the ACS, ACP, ACOG, etc. Titles like FACOG, FACP, FACS, are not the same as board certification. They indicate a certain level of membership in a professional society.

Only states license physicians.

The AOA does board certification on the DO side; the ABMS (and its contituent specialty boards) does board certification on the MD side. If you trained at an AOA residency, you can generally only be board certified by the AOA, not the ABMS. The plaintiffs in this case are AOA-trained physicians who can only be board certified by the AOA, who requires you to pay for membership in order to be board certified. Board certification is often required for employment and hospital privileges. Therefore, if you want to be employable, you pretty much have to pay membership dues to the AOA.

Note that ACGME-trained doctors do not have to pay for any memberships to maintain ABMS certification. They just have to pay the certification fee.
 
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DrWBD

DrWBD

Formerly 'wanna_be_do'
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Long Island, NY USA
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Honestly, I read the claim and other news related against it and it's absolutely pointless and will be thrown out before lawyers even have a chance to present it. It's a standard contract case. You need liscenscure to practice medicine and the AOA is one of many licencing bodies in the USA. It sounds like these doctors had their licence from the MD bodies (FACS, etc.) and now want their money back from the AOA. It doesn't work like that lol. If you were licensed by the AOA, you pay the fee. That's how it works. If you already had a lisence and did'n't need the AOA yet still paid for it that's sortof your fault for not knowing the ruls in your state regarding which accredited body's licence was necessary/sufficient to practice in that state. The AOA doesn't force anyone to do anything.
I'll reply to you assuming you are genuine and not someone on the AOA's payroll trying to spread misinformation.

The case does not have anything to do with licensure. Physician licensure is a matter handled by individual states. If you graduate from an American MD or DO program and have passed all levels of USMLE or COMLEX, you can apply for state licensure.

What the case is actually about is board certification, specifically maintenance of certification. All of the plaintiff physicians are graduates of osteopathic residency/fellowship programs, not "MD bodies". It is clearly stated so in the first two pages of the suit. One becomes board certified by completing a residency or fellowship in a particular field (family medicine, surgery, etc) and completing a board certification examination. As graduates of osteopathic training programs, their board certification is granted through their respective osteopathic boards, which are all directly controlled by the AOA.

It used to be that once you became board certified you held that certification for life. Nowadays most boards require "maintenance of certification"; meaning you have to re-certify, usually by taking another examination, every few years. It also involves paying fees. This is not unique to Osteopathic programs. It is actually an area of controversy for MDs as well. Right now the American Board of Internal Medicine, which is part of the American Board of Medical Specialties, is in hot water for this same reason. (I'm certified by the ABIM.) It is basically a cash grab by these organizations to milk their diplomats for money in order to maintain their existence.

http://www.newsweek.com/certified-medical-controversy-320495

Basically this is extortion by the AOA. Membership in an organization has nothing to do with a physician's competence. Unfortunately because hospitals and insurance companies demand board certification for their affiliated physicians, the AOA holds a position of power that they have been exploiting for many years.

This lawsuit absolutely does have merit, and could have repercussions stronger than "the residency merger" for the osteopathic profession. As stated in the lawsuit, the amount of money involved is not insignificant. From Philly.com: The full price for an annual membership is $683. In the year ended May 31, 2014, membership dues accounted for $20.4 million of the association's $44 million in revenue, according to its latest public tax return. The association had $7.6 million in revenue from certifying boards. Basically the AOA is maintaining its existence through compulsory membership fees. If the membership requirement for maintaining board certification was abolished, the AOA is looking at 50% of its annual revenue disappearing.
 
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DrWBD

DrWBD

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The incoming OMS survey asks whether you intend to pursue an osteopathic or allopathic residency, and why.

cf
That's ridiculous, especially in light of the single accreditation system.
 
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IslandStyle808

Akuma residency or bust!
7+ Year Member
Aug 5, 2012
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Honestly, I read the claim and other news related against it and it's absolutely pointless and will be thrown out before lawyers even have a chance to present it. It's a standard contract case. You need liscenscure to practice medicine and the AOA is one of many licencing bodies in the USA. It sounds like these doctors had their licence from the MD bodies (FACS, etc.) and now want their money back from the AOA. It doesn't work like that lol. If you were licensed by the AOA, you pay the fee. That's how it works. If you already had a lisence and did'n't need the AOA yet still paid for it that's sortof your fault for not knowing the ruls in your state regarding which accredited body's licence was necessary/sufficient to practice in that state. The AOA doesn't force anyone to do anything.
If I recall correctly, you were insulting me a while back about University of Colorado (my statement wasn't wrong either) and I will immortalize this in case you call me out like that again. The above posters have nailed it. The more I read about AOA the more I realize how atrocious they are. They have allowed for residencies that are pay to play, complete one uncompetitive residency in order enter a competitive one, and my personal favorite the pyramid system (where you lose one resident per year). These low standards combined with this extortion of money is insane. The merger and this lawsuit was long overdue.
 
Aug 3, 2013
463
537
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If I recall correctly, you were insulting me a while back about University of Colorado (my statement wasn't wrong either) and I will immortalize this in case you call me out like that again. The above posters have nailed it. The more I read about AOA the more I realize how atrocious they are. They have allowed for residencies that are pay to play, complete one uncompetitive residency in order enter a competitive one, and my personal favorite the pyramid system (where you lose one resident per year). These low standards combined with this extortion of money is insane. The merger and this lawsuit was long overdue.
CU did take DOs this year in more than 1 specialty.
Done discussing this with you.
Get off my back.
 

IslandStyle808

Akuma residency or bust!
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Get a life and get off my back.
CU did take DOs this year in more than 1 specialty. Your statement was wrong.
They may take DOs, but they still have a strong bias. I had no problem with you countering my statement, my problem was the insult that came with it.
 

JoeUSA

7+ Year Member
Dec 20, 2009
123
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Attending Physician
Honestly, I read the claim and other news related against it and it's absolutely pointless and will be thrown out before lawyers even have a chance to present it. It's a standard contract case. You need liscenscure to practice medicine and the AOA is one of many licencing bodies in the USA. It sounds like these doctors had their licence from the MD bodies (FACS, etc.) and now want their money back from the AOA. It doesn't work like that lol. If you were licensed by the AOA, you pay the fee. That's how it works. If you already had a lisence and did'n't need the AOA yet still paid for it that's sortof your fault for not knowing the ruls in your state regarding which accredited body's licence was necessary/sufficient to practice in that state. The AOA doesn't force anyone to do anything.

Professional associations such as the AOA do not issue medical licenses. Medical licenses are issued by the states.

The AOA does require membership in the AOA in order to become certified by one of its certifying boards.
 
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Aug 22, 2017
5
1
Omg my colleagues and I are going through the same issue with AOBFP
to maintain family practice board certification u pay them at least $4000 every 7 year cycle to them to keep your board status it's a rip off and they give you some online modules and charge you $2k for them and tell you that it's a processing fee "
I wrote them a letter and they responded back without making any explanation as to why the excessive and abusive chArges
I am planning on writing letters to every single DO med school and residency program and congress people because this is abusive
Not to even talk about the fact that they FORCE you to maintain AOA MEMBERSHIP which is $731 year
 

Misrepresenting Reality

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Omg my colleagues and I are going through the same issue with AOBFP
to maintain family practice board certification u pay them at least $4000 every 7 year cycle to them to keep your board status it's a rip off and they give you some online modules and charge you $2k for them and tell you that it's a processing fee "
I wrote them a letter and they responded back without making any explanation as to why the excessive and abusive chArges
I am planning on writing letters to every single DO med school and residency program and congress people because this is abusive
Not to even talk about the fact that they FORCE you to maintain AOA MEMBERSHIP which is $731 year
The forced membership is a thing of the past soon.
 
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DrWBD

DrWBD

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IN THE NEWS
Osteopaths Settle Class Action Against American Osteopathic Association
By Michael Booth
July 31, 2018
New Jersey Law Journal

A class-action lawsuit filed by tens of thousands of osteopathic doctors against the American Osteopathic Association alleging fraud and antitrust violations has settled.

The 32,000 plaintiffs agreed to the settlement before U.S. District Judge Noel Hillman, sitting in Camden, on July 25.

A statement released by the plaintiffs’ law firm, Philadelphia-based Duane Morris, said the plaintiffs could receive up to $35 million in benefits as a result of the settlement. After class members have received notice of the settlement, Hillman will hold a hearing for final approval on Nov. 9.

The physician-plaintiffs who sued the AOA sufficiently stated antitrust claims at the pleading stage stemming from the agency’s alleged practice of tying board certification to association membership, Hillman ruled. The judge also ruled that the plaintiffs stated a viable claim under the New Jersey Consumer Fraud Act with their assertions about renewal fees imposed on doctors who had been promised their certifications would not expire.

Hillman also rejected the association’s motion to transfer the case to the Northern District of Illinois, near the group’s headquarters. The association did not argue that the District of New Jersey is an improper venue, but merely sought a transfer for its own convenience, he said.

The suit claims that 32,000 board-certified osteopathic physicians from around the country have no choice but to purchase the association’s memberships, even though they cost significantly more than membership in other physician associations with similar benefits.

Hillman found that, at the pleading stage, plaintiffs sufficiently stated claims for per se and “rule of reason” antitrust violations. The allegations, if accepted as true, show the association ties board certification to the purchases of two distinctive products, and that it affects a substantial amount of interstate commerce.

The suit was brought by three New Jersey physicians and one from Pennsylvania on behalf of a nationwide class of osteopathic physicians. The suit claims doctors were forced to purchase annual memberships, at $683 per year, in order to maintain their board certifications. Antitrust laws prohibit tying arrangements in which consumers who are interested in one product are forced to also purchase a second, the plaintiffs assert.

According to the terms of the settlement, association members will not be forced to take AOA-sponsored continuing medical education courses; membership in the AOA will not be a requirement of board certification; the plaintiffs will be offered two free AOA-sponsored CME courses of up to 12 credits; and the AOA will donate $2 million to a public-awareness campaign.

“The agreement appears to be the product of serious, informed, non-collusive and good faith reasonableness from the parties,” Hillman said in the order. “The agreement falls within the range of reasonableness.”

The plaintiffs were represented by Seth Goldberg, of the Philadelphia office of Duane Morris. The AOA was represented by Jeffrey Lorell, of Saiber in Florham Park.


Duane Morris LLP - Osteopaths Settle Class Action Against American Osteopathic Association