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Jobs after sports medicine

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Sportsbound

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Hey All!

The question has been asked in a few other forums but now that we have a dedicated forum, I'll post a similar question.

I will be starting a primary care sports med program this July. I didn't have a huge amount of interaction with non ortho sports guys in med school or residency. It seems like all I spoke to (prior to applying and during application/interview trail) either go on to work for an ortho group, stay academic or maintain their primary specialty but do sports medicine on the side. I've talked to a few people that worked for sports teams primarily or university clinics. Galactus also mentioned someone being a WWE ringside physician in an older posting, which is a pretty unique use of the specialty.

I'm curious to hear what other jobs (if any) people have heard of sports med graduates going on to do. I've checked the AMSSM jobs posting but they don't seem to post too much.
 

galactus

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Yeah there are your traditional tracks:
Private practice (primary specialty + SM)
SM only
Joining an ortho practice
Academic (mix between ortho and primary specialty), or fellowship faculty

Each of these tracks can get you into working with local HS/college/pro teams. Depends on the situation I guess. I've seen private practices be team docs for a college, as well as a giant health care system (university/academic) take care of college/pros.

Personally I know of a few situations some sports med graduates have done:

EM + SM - do ER shifts and do a few half days in SM clinic. I also know of a SM fellow grad that does only ER work now.
Private practice + med spa. Opened up a FM practice + SM clinic + med spa. Does joint injections, as well as Botox!
Concierge - Does FM/SM concierge house calls. Also works in urgent care on the side.
Urgent care
I'm sure there are plenty of other different scenarios.

If you log on to the AMSSM website, Go under membership > surveys & assessments.
- Under this you can see the pdf's of the graduate practice and salary surveys over the last few years, so you can see what kind of practices people tend to go into in each geographic region of the US, as well as starting salaries. They're good data points to go over when it's time to go look for a job post fellowship.
 
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Sportsbound

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Just to clarify, the person/people who did EM + SM or only ER work...was EM their primary specialty?
 

galactus

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Just to clarify, the person/people who did EM + SM or only ER work...was EM their primary specialty?

One person I know did FM to SM and now does ER work only, the others I know did EM as their primary specialty, but still do EM (ER shifts) and SM (via ortho clinic)
 

Synophrys

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don't forget about occupational medicine - workers compensation injuries are almost 100% musculoskeletal.
 
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Niko17

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Congrats! Are you family medicine or another specialty?


I'm not family med and worried about my chances
 

Meowster007

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One person I know did FM to SM and now does ER work only, the others I know did EM as their primary specialty, but still do EM (ER shifts) and SM (via ortho clinic)
Sorry for such an old reply. I had a question. Would it be feasible or even possible or sensible (I am looking at this from an incoming student perspective so please forgive me) to be a specialist as well as be a sports med doc? Ex.) Gastro +Sports Med if you had interest in both those areas and then possibly run a clinic with both populations for clinic (sports and GI)?
 

Lurts

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Sorry for such an old reply. I had a question. Would it be feasible or even possible or sensible (I am looking at this from an incoming student perspective so please forgive me) to be a specialist as well as be a sports med doc? Ex.) Gastro +Sports Med if you had interest in both those areas and then possibly run a clinic with both populations for clinic (sports and GI)?

Sports medicine is a specialty and you are a specialist. While not technically impossible to do both a GI and SM fellowship, it is not a feasible or sensible route for practice.
 
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Meowster007

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Sports medicine is a specialty and you are a specialist. While not technically impossible to do both a GI and SM fellowship, it is not a feasible or sensible route for practice.
Thanks for the info!
 

runfastnow

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Agree - the more breadth you do in unrelated specialties the worse you will do overall in both. Furthermore, your referral sources would have no idea what to do with you which could hurt referrals. i.e. Med-Peds, a lot of people end up do IM or pediatrics (there are a few who do continuity/transition type medicine between child to adult for rare diseases which is incredibly useful, but rare).

Pick the one you like best and then tailor your practice to the other interest. For example, one of the leaders in sports cardiology and EKGs in athletes is a family med-sports med trained person. If you like GI and sports then you could be a GI doing endoscopies/colonoscopies but also be the guy/gal that people refer athletes to with chronic nausea/vomiting/diarrhea/etc. with exercise.
 
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Meowster007

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Agree - the more breadth you do in unrelated specialties the worse you will do overall in both. Furthermore, your referral sources would have no idea what to do with you which could hurt referrals. i.e. Med-Peds, a lot of people end up do IM or pediatrics (there are a few who do continuity/transition type medicine between child to adult for rare diseases which is incredibly useful, but rare).

Pick the one you like best and then tailor your practice to the other interest. For example, one of the leaders in sports cardiology and EKGs in athletes is a family med-sports med trained person. If you like GI and sports then you could be a GI doing endoscopies/colonoscopies but also be the guy/gal that people refer athletes to with chronic nausea/vomiting/diarrhea/etc. with exercise.
Interesting take! I didn't think of that before! Thank you!
 

Meowster007

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Agree - the more breadth you do in unrelated specialties the worse you will do overall in both. Furthermore, your referral sources would have no idea what to do with you which could hurt referrals. i.e. Med-Peds, a lot of people end up do IM or pediatrics (there are a few who do continuity/transition type medicine between child to adult for rare diseases which is incredibly useful, but rare).

Pick the one you like best and then tailor your practice to the other interest. For example, one of the leaders in sports cardiology and EKGs in athletes is a family med-sports med trained person. If you like GI and sports then you could be a GI doing endoscopies/colonoscopies but also be the guy/gal that people refer athletes to with chronic nausea/vomiting/diarrhea/etc. with exercise.
Just wanted to pick your brain or anyone else's but how does an ER doc manage SM? Like is it a gig to escape the ER when age comes?
 
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Calizboosted76

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Just wanted to pick your brain or anyone else's but how does an ER doc manage SM? Like is it a gig to escape the ER when age or burnout comes?
Fixed that for you.

Its kind of the same setup as ER docs practicing hospice medicine or opening suboxone clinics, if I'm not mistaken.
 
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AJFKPU

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Why is the job market so rough for sports medicine ? Should one expect some openings in the second half of the fellowship?, Because it's very disappointing to experience that based on how competitive is it to get into sports medicine.
 
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Febreeze

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Why is the job market so rough for sports medicine ? Should one expect some openings in the second half of the fellowship?, Because it's very disappointing to experience that based on how competitive is it to get into sports medicine.
I'm hopefully gonna be a fellow in July, but wondering what your experience has been looking for jobs. You can PM me if you prefer!
 
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deleted732978

Why is the job market so rough for sports medicine ? Should one expect some openings in the second half of the fellowship?, Because it's very disappointing to experience that based on how competitive is it to get into sports medicine.
Rough in what way? I see a ton of openings when googling around in my large city. Planning to start applying to some of them once I match
 

AJFKPU

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Rough in what way? I see a ton of openings when googling around in my large city. Planning to start applying to some of them once I match
Many of them might be there for the past 8 months and never taken off after getting filled. Whenever a job is posted, there is already some work going on for recruitment inside the department. The number of fellows graduating every year are >260 nationwide (not sure about the exact number). I have been monitoring the postings since March 2021 and I can tell you there aren't too many jobs (definitely way less than 260). This is also one of the reasons for a 2 year fellowship proposal so that less people can apply to it and it would become less competitive, because the job market is horrible. Bottom line, you have to know someone inside the department if you want to get a sports medicine job, and if you are not trained in Residency or Fellowship in the state you want to settle down then you don't have many connections and it is harder to land by a pure sports medicine job.
 

AJFKPU

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I'm hopefully gonna be a fellow in July, but wondering what your experience has been looking for jobs. You can PM me if you prefer!
Me and my co-fellow are thinking to take jobs in our primary speciality. If you do not have good connections in the state you want to settle down then you need to be open to neighbourhood states or smaller towns. This isn't to say you cannot land the job you are looking for. But the truth is there is a lot of interest with fairly saturated job market.
 
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deleted732978

Many of them might be there for the past 8 months and never taken off after getting filled. Whenever a job is posted, there is already some work going on for recruitment inside the department. The number of fellows graduating every year are >260 nationwide (not sure about the exact number). I have been monitoring the postings since March 2021 and I can tell you there aren't too many jobs (definitely way less than 260). This is also one of the reasons for a 2 year fellowship proposal so that less people can apply to it and it would become less competitive, because the job market is horrible. Bottom line, you have to know someone inside the department if you want to get a sports medicine job, and if you are not trained in Residency or Fellowship in the state you want to settle down then you don't have many connections and it is harder to land by a pure sports medicine job.
I hear you that it’s a mismatch, and I should have realized you meant 100% sports only. I’m seeing a ton of FM/sports mix opportunities or UC/sports. Basically it seems like demand for primary care is what brings a lot of opportunities to the FM trained sports job seekers. Are you not FM?
 

Febreeze

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While we are on this topic haha, any leads for EM/Sports combo jobs?
 
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AJFKPU

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I hear you that it’s a mismatch, and I should have realized you meant 100% sports only. I’m seeing a ton of FM/sports mix opportunities or UC/sports. Basically it seems like demand for primary care is what brings a lot of opportunities to the FM trained sports job seekers. Are you not FM?
No I'm IM trained. And yes if you are open to mixing it with primary care then you have a better chance of landing a job. Most competitive ones are college/student health services jobs. Then come Ortho jobs. You have to inquire a primary care practice how much sports medicine you would be doing and you have to build your practice from the scratch in any setting regardless. However, keep in mind that primary care groups have to compete with nearby Ortho groups for sports medicine patients. So getting a 50% primary care and 50% sports medicine job isn't easy either.
 
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deleted732978

While we are on this topic haha, any leads for EM/Sports combo jobs?
Not the OP but I’m peds. Curious how this would impact my future (I’m NOT applying to the peds sports programs): truthfully, I have no idea
Happen to work with an attending that is peds and did both a sports + PEM fellowship and basically doubles as a sports doc with ED shifts. He’s also the one that advised me to look for jobs in an oldschool way e.g. cold calling, selling yourself to the place you want to work. They basically created the position for him
 
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deleted732978

Well look how that came full circle lol

Do you know if he did a peds specific sports program? To make me even more confused my mentor told me recently that you can do a peds specific sports program and still have the scope of regular sports. I still can’t wrap my mind around it

100% sports is the dream but wouldn’t mind 50/50. Not ideal but hey that’s life
he did Lutheran! That’s an FM one. He did discourage me from looking at peds sports programs precisely for what you’re describing because he sees adults in his sports practice and feels the peds fellowships are too limited.

Honestly most of what surgeons see in clinic is non op and a lot of them quite frankly want to be in the OR as much as possible. If you put your wolf of Wall Street face on and really sell it to those guys I think it’s not bad advice to try.

I’m hoping to take a stab at private practice myself

Sell the pen!
 
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deluxedeluxe

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Does anyone know when fellows start looking for jobs? Right after match, first half of fellowship, second half, etc? Most of my co-residents secured jobs at the beginning of their third year and some during second year, but I’m not sure how it works with fellowship.
 

Moose A Moose

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Does anyone know when fellows start looking for jobs? Right after match, first half of fellowship, second half, etc? Most of my co-residents secured jobs at the beginning of their third year and some during second year, but I’m not sure how it works with fellowship.
Half way through fellowship.
 
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AJFKPU

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Half way through fellowship.
I would say start in early September. I know a few people who have locked down the jobs already. I started soon as my Fellowship started and still haven't found anything. There is so much interest with a very few jobs.
 
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I_Cant_tell_you

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I just signed a contract today. I started applying almost immediately. Had several interviews and no one seemed to really want to move forward up until recently. Most wanted to bring someone on sooner than I was available.

I was fortunate to have had two to pick from. This is for a combination sports and family medicine btw. I’ve realized 100% sports would be too boring for me. I’ll have an ultrasound to do all my injections and diagnostic scans, but also be able to do my primary care. I’m excited.
 
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AJFKPU

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Congratulations for getting a job. I finished my Fellowship and I'm starting again in my primary speciality. I did IM residency and worked a lot in an busy program to get the fellowship. I didn't match in the first cycle with more than 10 interviews. Found out this year that getting a job in sports medicine can be harder than getting a Fellowship in itself. Extremely disappointed and demoralized now because I wanted to work as a specialist. Moving your family and kids with changing jobs for a year is not a piece of cake. I put my family through a lot of emotional and economic strain to do this fellowship. Turns out it wasn't worth doing anyways. I think new sports medicine applicants need to know the reality that they only way to get a job is know someone on the inside who can hire you and getting a sports medicine job will not be easy. Most of the jobs select their candidates and then they post them online to portray that they are playing by the federal fair labor reporting laws... Pathetic.... If I have to do it all over again then I will not.chose sports medicine.
 

timisdaman

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Congratulations for getting a job. I finished my Fellowship and I'm starting again in my primary speciality. I did IM residency and worked a lot in an busy program to get the fellowship. I didn't match in the first cycle with more than 10 interviews. Found out this year that getting a job in sports medicine can be harder than getting a Fellowship in itself. Extremely disappointed and demoralized now because I wanted to work as a specialist. Moving your family and kids with changing jobs for a year is not a piece of cake. I put my family through a lot of emotional and economic strain to do this fellowship. Turns out it wasn't worth doing anyways. I think new sports medicine applicants need to know the reality that they only way to get a job is know someone on the inside who can hire you and getting a sports medicine job will not be easy. Most of the jobs select their candidates and then they post them online to portray that they are playing by the federal fair labor reporting laws... Pathetic.... If I have to do it all over again then I will not.chose sports medicine.
Honestly, if you are IM and having trouble finding a job, you are probably being too selective. Most Sports Medicine jobs are a combo of sports and your primary specialty. If you are willing to do primary care and sports, there are tons of jobs out there. If you want to do traditional sports; ie: be a team/school physician, you are already at an advantage over all the PM&R folks as far as the hirers are concerned.

However, you are correct. Who you know matters a lot. And many university postings already have their candidates in mind when they make the post.
 

I_Cant_tell_you

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Congratulations for getting a job. I finished my Fellowship and I'm starting again in my primary speciality. I did IM residency and worked a lot in an busy program to get the fellowship. I didn't match in the first cycle with more than 10 interviews. Found out this year that getting a job in sports medicine can be harder than getting a Fellowship in itself. Extremely disappointed and demoralized now because I wanted to work as a specialist. Moving your family and kids with changing jobs for a year is not a piece of cake. I put my family through a lot of emotional and economic strain to do this fellowship. Turns out it wasn't worth doing anyways. I think new sports medicine applicants need to know the reality that they only way to get a job is know someone on the inside who can hire you and getting a sports medicine job will not be easy. Most of the jobs select their candidates and then they post them online to portray that they are playing by the federal fair labor reporting laws... Pathetic.... If I have to do it all over again then I will not.chose sports medicine.
My gig is basically a FM and acting as an internal referral for my partners. I agree job market is horrible. I don't know why there are so many programs still popping up (I mean, I know why--free labor, but it's not fair to the fellows to make it seem like there are jobs out there).
 
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