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Johns Hopkins and Yale--What should I do??

Discussion in 'Public Health Degrees (Masters and Doctoral)' started by Doctorphilic, Apr 10, 2007.

  1. Doctorphilic

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    Dear my fellow aspiring school of public health students. I am sure the question of school's merits have been asked a million times and i have found your advises to be constructive for the most part. Here is the dilemma: I just got an email today from Johns Hopkins telling me that i have been accepted to their epidemiology of infectious disease program. Also i am considering Yale's Epidemiology of Microbial disease as i have been accepted to their department.

    Both of the schools and programs are wonderful. I love infectious diseases and i think both schools will offer me the education. I am also using MPH as an auxillary degree as my passion is MD (medicine)---which i will pursue right after school of public health (2yrs masters). So, I have to make some painful decision in the coming week and i need your sincere input. Yale pretty much gave me loans with few grants. Hopkins did not specify Financial aid. I will greately appreciate your feedbacks and good luck to you all as you embark on your endavors!
     
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  3. AgentSik007

    AgentSik007 Junior Member

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    Without question go to John Hopkins. Yale's main advantage is that it has a small incoming class, but Yale does not have the same funding and the same type of research opportunities as those of Hopkins (specifically I'm talking about Epi). Also you will be in proximity of the NIH and many other research labs. Besides, when it comes to epi programs, there is no institution quite like that of Hopkins.
     
  4. Doctorphilic

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    Thanks AgentSik007 and i really appreciate your response. Definitely it will help me make some informed decisions. Good luck with everything!
     
  5. zongus

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    JHU w/out any use of your brain.........Yale's program is OK, but I have heard negative things about their administration and faculty. Besides, its JHU!!!!!!!!
    #1 SPH in the nation....great research and respect in the field. In addition, you want to do the MD? Go to JHU! However, I have heard great things about Yale's Med School. If anything, you can always go back for your MD at Yale (MD Yale, MPH JHU).......nice! Good luck w/ that! I know it is a hard thing to let one go...its part of life (trade-offs). I'm in the same situation w/ Cornell and Michigan for the MHSA. Michigan is #1 but I've been here for four years of undergrad and hoped for a change.
     
  6. Doctorphilic

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    Fabulous response Zongus and I appreciate your response and also wish u all the best!!!
     
  7. AndrewJ42

    AndrewJ42 Member

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    quick question...are you going into the MHS program or the MPH program at JHU, you might have said it, but i'm a bit confused as they don't usually accept non-terminal degree holding students into their MPH program.

    and in the case that you are going for the MHS at Hopkins...there is something to consider in the marketability of a MHS over an MPH

    but if they're both MPH degrees...hell, Hopkins it is :)
     
  8. Doctorphilic

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    AndrewJ42, it is great to hear from you again. Yeah U make a good point and I got into the MHS program at Hopkins, which is different from MPH--i am applying right from Undergrad with no experience at all. So, I am not sure in terms of how these two degrees vary and whether what one studies also depends on the MPH or MHS distinction. Your comment on this will be appreciated. thanks and good luck
     
  9. KrKra

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    I am SO happy that I found this topic on the forum! I was going back and forth between Yale and Hopkins (Yale - MPH in Health Management, Hopkins - MPH and MBA). I decided on Hopkins (even though I did undergraduate there...which was a slight deterrent). I liked Yale's small class and the health management program (and the name, of course!) but with Hopkins I just felt like I would get more out of the program and have better resources (research opps, faculty, etc.).

    Any other thoughts on the MPH at Hopkins vs. Yale???
     
  10. AndrewJ42

    AndrewJ42 Member

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    the MHS degree at Hopkins is supposed to be more of an introduction and concentration on certain aspects of public health while the MPH there is considered to be a more generalist degree. the MPH program at Hopkins is 11 months (if I remember correctly) and it's very intense.

    From what I've heard, most people who are going for their MHS degrees at Hopkins are looking towards another degree and not stopping with the MHS degree in itself. Most of the kids you'll run into are in similar situations as yourself as they want to apply to medical school. The MHS degree vs. MPH degree only gives slight edge to the MPH degree as it is recognized worldwide...if you were to try to get a job with a MHS degree with someone who is unfamiliar with the Hopkin's degree system, you may have to explain the degree...but I'm sure they would understand.

    If you do a search on this forum about the MHS degree you'd find a lot of mixed sentiments about the degree. Many people have felt that if they could "go back" they would have gained more experience and gone for the MPH degree.

    The Pros vs. Cons of Hopkins vs. Yale (subjective...just what I think)

    Pros for Hopkins:
    Largest and oldest Public Health school in the world, the school of public health garnishes 25% of all NIH grants going to public health schools, opportunities to research, you'll get to maybe attend the Hopkins Young Alumni Tent reunions...the best freakin' alumni event ever (btw, I didn't attend Hopkins...i just get to tag along with the roommates)

    Cons for Hopkins:
    Largest can equal large classes, it's in Baltimore..nuff said (East Baltimore at that...), I would rather have an MPH than a MHS, Hopkins is stingy on Financial aid (being that it's such a large school)

    Pros for Yale:
    The name Yale is know throughout the world as a great educational institute, Yale is pretty good with financial aid, two words... Yale Club

    Cons for Yale:
    The Yale School of Public Health is not very well respected in the field of public health, it's in New Haven..nuff said, the Medical School/Public Health school are facing scrutiny for their research and that has lead to future funding cuts from the NIH/CDC/NSF/etc.


    Each public health school in the country has its pros and cons...I'm just spitting out a few I've read in this forum...so good luck with you choice!
     
  11. seabreeze811

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    Hello,

    I don't know if i could be much help, but I went to Hopkins last year and got an MHS degree in biology (NOT MPH). Although it's not an MPH, i would HIGHLY, HIGHLY recommend Hopkins. I think the school is an outstanding institution and the professors are excellent and what they teach. I have learned so much at hopkins. eventhough my degree was more science based, they still try to integrate public health aspects, and i greatly enjoyed that even more!

    i think academically, you could gain so much at hopkins. you have professors in public health and from the medical school teaching as well. i guess it would depend on what classes too. in terms of class size, it really depends on the course. if you are taking a really popular class, then yes it will be relatively large class size. those will be in lecture halls (but i came from a large-sized university at UC Irvine and lecture halls at hopkins is nothing compared to uci. so to me, i didn't consider it to be too large). some classes are very small and intimate of about 20 students or even less. that was very different to me because like i said, im used to uci with always being in a class of at least 300 to 400 students.

    yes baltimore isn't the best. it took me several months to get used to even, but after a while you'll get used to it. security is pretty good at school so it'll be okay. they always have baltimore police around the campus...so you get a sense of security.

    My overal experience at JHSPH was really great. i enjoyed it very much and i hope this helps. good luck!
     
  12. zongus

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    Actually....I was interested in Yale's Health Management program because of their MBA cross-curriculum. However, if you got in the MPH/MBA program at JHU, then you're already set! Stay at JHU.

    PS
    I did undergrad at University of Michigan, and as much as I wanted to change atmosphere, I'm staying for the MHSA! GOTTA BE OBJECTIVE! (and besides, if you liked ur Baltimore experience, then it won't hurt to go back....I loved Ann Arbor).
     
  13. aupz23

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    Hello!

    Yale and Johns Hopkins are excellent schools, I think....I've heard that some MPH students from Yale received presigious public health and healthcare administrative fellowships (ex: Baylor College of Medicine and UNC- chapel hill)...As prestigious as Yale is, you would think that they would have lots of funding to do research; every school as pros and cons...

    Speaking of this, I just found out yesterday that Washington University in St. Louis's health administration will be terminated as of June 2008. The Dean of Medicine as WashU decided to terminate the program b/c there hasn't been much, if any, research coming from the program and that the majority of the faculty were part-time; I was shocked when I heard that b/c WashU is in the top 20 healthcare management grad programs for 2008; despite having this high ranking, it will still be terminated...That's messed up :( You never know about these schools

    I've heard Johns Hopkins is a great school too! :)
     
  14. Doctorphilic

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    All wonderful comments! So the consensus is that Hopkins is a better school as far as SPH is concerned. Also i did more research and found that Yale does not calculate GPA where as Hopkins assigns a letter grade and that is definitely a crucial point to consider in addition to other factors. For Hopkins, letter grade means more competitive enviroment plus being the best schcool already makes it one of the most competitive public health schools. Where as Yale is more of lay back and you can get the basic education. I guess i am just going to have to cross my finger, close my eyes and pick one of the two. Since my goal is medicine, i guess either experience will complement the medical training.
     
  15. AwaPremed

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  17. caroles

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    I got this post from a google search. I want to get my MPH in policy or management, and have narrowed down my choices between Columbia or Yale. I like the small program at Yale, but don't know if I want the extra semester, of if Columbia provides more opportunities - because I am coming out of undergrad. What do you think?
     
  18. George Stanovic

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    Like these kinds of Questions! Where is your destiny?

    I'd vote for YALE! although... Hopkins is so advanced in their research and MPH programs.

    I'd say really tour the schools and see which "ENVIRONMENT" fits you better.

    write out all the good and the bad on notebook for each school.
    you will get the answer.

    If you decide to go to Hopkins anyway, which is a very fine school to be an MD, The MPH program here is very respected and like everyone before says, it is just outstanding. So if you move to Baltimore and need an apartment to rent,
    click on my email under my name and email if you need housing.
     
    #16 George Stanovic, Jan 14, 2011
    Last edited: Jan 14, 2011
  19. ToxMan1

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    lol...This thread is four years old. Oldie but a goodie....I guess.
     
  20. mezmerized7

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    Is the Yale School of Public Health still facing scrutiny? Just curious.


     
  21. Stories

    Stories Life Afficianado
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    I've heard a lot of scrutiny about YSPH being a current student, but that last tidbit right there is one of the most false things I've ever heard. Research productivity and scholarly output is by far the biggest strength of the school. We hear the shortcomings in class offerings, practical/applied public health, but research opportunities and funding have *never* been a fault of the school.

    From the National Academies (http://sites.nationalacademies.org/pga/Resdoc/index.htm), they rated the productivity of faculty and research at all doctoral-granting programs in the country, and Yale was in the top 3 of all public health schools/departments.
     
  22. werd814

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    This is the first I've heard of Yale facing scrutiny for its research-- I've only ever heard (and experienced) solid things about the research program here. I'd be interested to see what AndrewJ42 was referring to in 2007. Either way, we get plenty of money from the gov-- around $41 mil this year (http://publichealth.yale.edu/research/index.aspx), which, for a school as small as ours, is phenomenal.

    As far as Yale's reputation, I don't entirely understand why so many consider it a school of ill-repute. I mean, I guess I got the idea from USNWR and these forums that going to Yale over Harvard and UW (my two options) would be the end of my public health career, but everyone I've spoken with in the field of public health has been thrilled with the name. We have an absolutely wonderful relationship with the NIH (http://recovery.nih.gov/stories/yale.php , http://publichealth.yale.edu/news/news/2010/november/liver.aspx), the CDC (http://dailybulletin.yale.edu/article.aspx?id=7728 , http://opac.yale.edu/news/article.aspx?id=1842), NCI ( http://publichealth.yale.edu/cde/curriculum/phd_cde/funding/ncitraininggrant/index.aspx ), etc. Greatly accomplished Yale undergrads often join the highly-competitive Yale College/YSPH 5-year BA/MPH program, which adds a cool bit of character to the student body. And, we have access not only to YSPH's solid alum network, but to Yale University's as a whole (including folk like Unite for Sight founder Jennifer Staple).

    And the Global Health program is amazing (27% of my class is involved: http://publichealth.yale.edu/global/curriculum/index.aspx ). The brand of "Yale" as well as it's alum/professional network is able to bring the. most. amazing speakers to the weekly Global Health seminar series. And the students at the University (YSPH definitely included) are very impressive and very motivated. I'm in a student club right now that, through its novel approaches to some heinous global health malfeasances, has raised the attention of Paul Farmer, who's coming to chat with us in a few weeks. I'm also in a joint Forestry- Public Health consulting class in which we will consult on agroforestry, sustainable technologies, water problems, hospital management, etc. for L'Hopital Albert Schweitzer in Haiti ( http://www.hashaiti.org/ ), including free trips to our worksite.

    And on that note, we can take classes at any school in the university system-- I've taken mostly joint Forestry-Public Health classes as I'm an EHS concentration-- including MED, LAW, the College, etc. That said, the YSPH classes can be really quite good, and many advisor-student relationships are superb (dinner parties at the advisor's house, etc.).
     
    #20 werd814, Jan 21, 2011
    Last edited: Jan 21, 2011
  23. werd814

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    The ol' one-two punch. hah.
     
  24. lepursuit

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    That sounds amazing! Is it typical for the classes to be so hands on? I'm looking into possibly doing a joint-educational experience approach between infectious disease control and sustainable development (via school of forestry). What classes do you recommend and did you feel like there were professors with research interests that matched yours at Yale?
     

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