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just curious, who pays for detained patients

Discussion in 'Psychiatry' started by neuro_psych, Jul 22, 2006.

  1. neuro_psych

    neuro_psych Junior Member

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    Hi

    It might sound like a silly question but I am jus curious to find out detaining of too ill patients.

    Who makes a referral for too ill patient( with no insight)

    How is a patient detained, how many doctors are required to make a decision.

    If patient has no insurance( which is more likely) who pays for his treatment and to doctors.

    I am currently in uk,here state pays for everything, just wondering how things work in US

    cheers
     
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  3. outofhere

    outofhere Member
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    It is not clear to me what you mean by 'detained.' Do you mean held against that person's will or incarcerated.
    Insurance pays for all hospital stays, whether voluntary or not. If a person doesn't have insurance, I am not sure if they get billed. That would be interesting to take it to court, "I didn't even want this, how can they charge me for this?" For the incarcerated, it is our tax dollars that pay. In my training program, the county picks up the tab (the tax payers) for those without insurance.
     
  4. Psyclops

    Psyclops 1K Member
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    In the US, in my experiece, if somone is committed to a psychiatric hospital, and they don't have insurance, their county of residence ususally picks up the bill. As you note, it would be hard to hold someone liable for unwanted (albeit neccessary) hospitalization. Even in the case you wanted to make their payment a punative measure to discourage future behavior, they would certainly have the germs of a insanity case. It becomes more interesting when the psychiatric hospital tries to collect from said county. Often times they aren't the best payers. I hospitals I worked in before they would't accept pts from certain counties, even with signed letters of payment gurantees from county administrators.
     
  5. ny skindoc

    ny skindoc Senior Member
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    These days localities are more aggresive in seeking payment for services considered medically necessary.They are likely to bill the patient for the treatment rendered.If the person has the money or private insurance they will be expected to pay.If not efforts to obtain medicaid coverage will be intiated by social services.It really depends on the particualr facility,the state and the financial situation of the patient.
     
  6. 50960

    50960 Guest

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    In Ca. we call that taxes.....
     
  7. neuro_psych

    neuro_psych Junior Member

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    Hi all

    Thanks for your answers, It gives me some insight.

    Yes by detained I meant ' patients held against their will because of severe mental illness, and being a threat to themselve( suicide risk) or others( schizophrenic with paranoid delusion) '

    As we know that patients with severe mental illness will be in lower socialeconomic class, more likely to be unemployed than employed, deserted by family. So it is more likely that they will be unsportted by family financially and not likely to have insurance.

    Due to this I would imagine, some of them would be wandering about on streets as well, what happens to them. As these are the people who need more psychiatric care than others. It seems some of these will be neglected because of more private system.
     
  8. Anasazi23

    Anasazi23 Your Digital Ruler
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    If the patient has billable insurance, it is billed since it is a medically necessary procedure. A comparison would be the ambulance bill to the hospital after a car accident in which the person loses consciousness. While this is a slightly different concept ("Implied consent"), the result is the same.

    If the person has no billable insurance and does not have medicaid (medicaid is NOT insurance....I hate when patients say that :mad: ), they'll receive a bill.

    Which they generally won't pay.
     
  9. Demosthenes

    Demosthenes Member
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    Around here, what I've seen is that the pt is billed first, and then the social services people will step in to try to get coverage through county or federal programs. Often, though, the Feds will require a Share of Cost from the pt, which is based on FEDERAL poverty guidelines. I think pts are allowed up to about $600 dollars a month in income, everything else must go to SOC.

    This is one of the most expensive housing markets in the country, which means that no one on these programs can pay rent, since rent is certain to be above $600.

    And don't get me started on ambulance companies. Those are billed to the pt around here, with no reduction in cost due to indigence.

    So, while taxpayers are paying for a lot of 5150s, the system is already set up in such a way that everyone loses. Except private ambulance companies, of course.
     
  10. Doc Samson

    Doc Samson gamma irradiated
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    If a patient has insurance, we pre-certify the admission (even if involuntary) with the insurance first, so they're agreeing to pay for it ahead of time (usually for ~3 days at a time before you have to call back and review for another 3 days). The uninsured fall into the "uncompensated care pool", for which the hospital gets some money each year, but never enough to cover the care delivered.
     

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