lazybutt26

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Just found out about my mcat score. It's really low and I can't describe how I even feel about it.
The problem is, I have already submitted all of my applications including secondaries.
So I guess I will have to wait for the interview-which is very likely given low MCAT even though I have a high GPA.

My question is, can I retake the mcat while schools review my application?
Some of my friend did this-they retook it in October. I know some schools might wait for the scores to come out-is there anyway to indicate for retake for MCAT on verified AMCAS anyways?

Thanks all for your help!
 

PatchA

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It's going to be hard for us to really advise you without actually knowing your score. However, if you have already submitted, then trying to retake in a month or so might be your best bet. The problem with this is that you need to be able to identify what went wrong and, more importantly, correct it the second time around. What were your practice test scores? Were these good and your actual score just took a nose dive? Or were they not great and you took it anyway? How are you going to change your approach this time around?

FYI to others reading this, this exact scenario is why it's best to take your MCAT before the application season or submit to only one school until you know your score.
 

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If your score is well below 508, I recommend withdrawing from everywhere and applying next year on time with a good score ready to go.

You should only retake the exam when you are most prepared and confident. Don't rush it for Sep/Oct. And nothing stops schools from making decisions based on the score you already have.
 
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1) My question is, can I retake the mcat while schools review my application?
Some of my friend did this-they retook it in October. I know some schools might wait for the scores to come out-

2) is there anyway to indicate for retake for MCAT on verified AMCAS anyways?
1) Yes.

2) Yes, this is one of the few things you can change in a submitted and verified AMCAS application. Go in and add a new final MCAT date and resubmit.

Ideally you'll add the new date soon, before your application is evaluated/screened. And, ideally, schools will then wait until the new score arrives before considering your application.
 

Goro

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Just found out about my mcat score. It's really low and I can't describe how I even feel about it.
The problem is, I have already submitted all of my applications including secondaries.
So I guess I will have to wait for the interview-which is very likely given low MCAT even though I have a high GPA.

My question is, can I retake the mcat while schools review my application?
Some of my friend did this-they retook it in October. I know some schools might wait for the scores to come out-is there anyway to indicate for retake for MCAT on verified AMCAS anyways?

Thanks all for your help!
How low?

Yes, you can retake, but schools aren't going to wait your your new score. You will be evaluated once you're complete.
 
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The last MCAT for the year is a little over a month away, sign up for it only if you think you can make a big difference in your score. Otherwise, hope for the best this year and study for the January test. Maybe you wont even need to to take the test in January
 

candbgirl

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How low is it?
Why do you think you'll vastly improve next month?
Why did you apply to all of your schools without your score?
How did you even select the schools without your scores?

Of course you can retake but if you've been verified and the schools have your primary you will marked ready for initial review when they get your MCAT. You can notify AMCAS you are retaking but schools are under no obligation to wait for your new score. In other words, by the time you retake and they get the new score a decision might have been made on your application.

Really, how low is your score? Any chance you are over reacting?


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Terror Billy

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Yeah it would be very beneficial if you provided a range of your score. At the very least, it could be good enough for AACOMAS
 

mariposas905

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Just found out about my mcat score. It's really low and I can't describe how I even feel about it.
The problem is, I have already submitted all of my applications including secondaries.
So I guess I will have to wait for the interview-which is very likely given low MCAT even though I have a high GPA.

My question is, can I retake the mcat while schools review my application?
Some of my friend did this-they retook it in October. I know some schools might wait for the scores to come out-is there anyway to indicate for retake for MCAT on verified AMCAS anyways?

Thanks all for your help!
OP if this was your second MCAT score and it's similar to the first, then perhaps you should not rush the third since you would need to do very good on the 3rd MCAT considering the first two low ones. It wouldn't be fun to take the MCAT a fourth time...

Only retake in a month if you know you will do very well. Otherwise, in your case, I feel January might be best. Of course, if your score is good for DO then go for it!
 

mariposas905

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Well two hours ago OP said he'd submitted all application cations including secondaries so...

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Yeah I just realized that :rolleyes:...not sure, but maybe OP ended up turning in apps after all. Either way, if this was his second low MCAT, it would probably help to wait a while before taking the third test.
 
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candbgirl

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Yeah I just realized that :rolleyes:...not sure, but maybe OP ended up turning in apps after all. Either way, if this was his second low MCAT, it would probably help to wait a while before taking the third test.
So now OP has two low MCATs , has submitted all secondaries and wants to take the MCAT for the third time within a few months? Wow!


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Well two hours ago OP said he'd submitted all application cations including secondaries so...
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If the OP is only submitting the positive parts of their application, then I don't see it being an issue.
 
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mariposas905

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So now OP has two low MCATs , has submitted all secondaries and wants to take the MCAT for the third time within a few months? Wow!

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Based on the previous thread and this one, that's what it seems like. I could be wrong though, idk :confused:
 

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If the OP is only submitting the positive parts of their application, then I don't see it being an issue.
All MCAT scores are automatically sent to AMCAS. Once the AMCAS primary is verified, schools will have access to all scores.
 

gonnif

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just as a lesson here for future readers of the thread; applying to medical school without having an acceptable MCAT is one of the top ten premed mistakes. I am not a fan of any student working on AMCAS until they have an MCAT score. I also not a big fan of single "throwaway school" for verification of an AMCAS while waiting for MCAT score as applicants are then splitting their time, energy, and focus between the primary and MCAT. This was born out to me today when 3 advisees who took this route got their scores today. All 3 were well below expectations and will not be applying this cycle. At least they only had submitted to a single school so there is little worry on reapplicant status

to reiterate, the MCAT is so vital to an application that no student really considering working on the AMCAS until the MCAT is taken and a score recieved. Those try to fit in hard coursework, MCAT, and AMCAS at end of junior year maybe well advised to consider delaying until the next cycle to apply
 

efle

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^ I'm a huge fan of doing the MCAT prep during a summer ahead of applying. Not only because during semester your classes can get in the way, but ECs like research and volunteering can eat up too much time too. This single test is worth/weighted as much as your entire undergraduate academic record, you really need to be able to block out a big chunk of time for MCAT studying on a daily basis for weeks and weeks.
 

MTRN406

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just as a lesson here for future readers of the thread; applying to medical school without having an acceptable MCAT is one of the top ten premed mistakes. I am not a fan of any student working on AMCAS until they have an MCAT score. I also not a big fan of single "throwaway school" for verification of an AMCAS while waiting for MCAT score as applicants are then splitting their time, energy, and focus between the primary and MCAT. This was born out to me today when 3 advisees who took this route got their scores today. All 3 were well below expectations and will not be applying this cycle. At least they only had submitted to a single school so there is little worry on reapplicant status

to reiterate, the MCAT is so vital to an application that no student really considering working on the AMCAS until the MCAT is taken and a score recieved. Those try to fit in hard coursework, MCAT, and AMCAS at end of junior year maybe well advised to consider delaying until the next cycle to apply
I am using this strategy, as circumstances were such that I had to take the MCAT on 07/28 this year. The way that I look at it is, if August 29th rolls around and my scores are not where they should be, applying next year will just be a cut-and-paste job. Since I only applied to a throwaway school so far, I can just recycle my personal statement and activity descriptions and use the secondaries that I've already written (if the school doesn't change them up too much), since I will not be a reapplicant and the schools will be seeing those things for the first time next year anyway.

In other words, if it turns out that my MCAT is too low and I have to wait until next year to apply, I will have basically gotten the rest of my application out of the way a year ahead of time.
 

efle

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I am using this strategy, as circumstances were such that I had to take the MCAT on 07/28 this year. The way that I look at it is, if August 29th rolls around and my scores are not where they should be, applying next year will just be a cut-and-paste job. Since I only applied to a throwaway school so far, I can just recycle my personal statement and activity descriptions and use the secondaries that I've already written (if the school doesn't change them up too much), since I will not be a reapplicant and the schools will be seeing those things for the first time next year anyway.

In other words, if it turns out that my MCAT is too low and I have to wait until next year to apply, I will have basically gotten the rest of my application out of the way a year ahead of time.
I think gonnif's concern was that you might have sacrificed some MCAT prep time and instead spent those hours on your primary app. If you didn't start working on your statement and activities until after 7/28, then you didn't fall victim to the phenomenon he's describing, even if your score comes back low.
 
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MTRN406

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I think gonnif's concern was that you might have sacrificed some MCAT prep time and instead spent those hours on your primary app. If you didn't start working on your statement and activities until after 7/28, then you didn't fall victim to the phenomenon he's describing, even if your score comes back low.
I already had everything done except for the MCAT. If I'm pleased with my MCAT score then my primary, letters of recommendation, and MCAT will all go to the schools that day.
 

mwsapphire

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Just found out about my mcat score. It's really low and I can't describe how I even feel about it.
The problem is, I have already submitted all of my applications including secondaries.
So I guess I will have to wait for the interview-which is very likely given low MCAT even though I have a high GPA.

My question is, can I retake the mcat while schools review my application?
Some of my friend did this-they retook it in October. I know some schools might wait for the scores to come out-is there anyway to indicate for retake for MCAT on verified AMCAS anyways?

Thanks all for your help!
I actually don't think OP submitted to all schools...they only submitted to one throwaway school and were planning to add the rest today as per OP's previous thread:

Updating MCAT Score and secondaries
Wait, so they have two MCAT's ruined by an acute headache, or one? If it's two, you should see a doctor, OP, or at least try a massive dose of painkillers before the test. I actually have year round headache problems, so I'm used to taking tests with headaches. This may have to do with stress, ( which is the case with me).
I'd delay applying- prep for the mcat properly and aim for a sky-high retake, only then will the average on your scores improve enough to make you competitive ( If you took two or one, whichever. More so for the former).
 

gonnif

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I already had everything done except for the MCAT. If I'm pleased with my MCAT score then my primary, letters of recommendation, and MCAT will all go to the schools that day.
And my point is the time you spent getting AMCAS and rest ready before the MCAT may have been better spent preparing for the exam. the long term risk is that a poor MCAT score will stay with you forever and applicants need to see this process in terms of risk and optomizing chances
 
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AttemptingScholar

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just as a lesson here for future readers of the thread; applying to medical school without having an acceptable MCAT is one of the top ten premed mistakes. I am not a fan of any student working on AMCAS until they have an MCAT score. I also not a big fan of single "throwaway school" for verification of an AMCAS while waiting for MCAT score as applicants are then splitting their time, energy, and focus between the primary and MCAT. This was born out to me today when 3 advisees who took this route got their scores today. All 3 were well below expectations and will not be applying this cycle. At least they only had submitted to a single school so there is little worry on reapplicant status

to reiterate, the MCAT is so vital to an application that no student really considering working on the AMCAS until the MCAT is taken and a score recieved. Those try to fit in hard coursework, MCAT, and AMCAS at end of junior year maybe well advised to consider delaying until the next cycle to apply
I'm trying to balance "take the MCAT before apps" and "take the MCAT after all relevant prereqs" but the only way to do it is to take a gap year for no reason other than the timing of the test. If I have to choose, what's most important (or is a gap the only option)?
 

gonnif

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I'm trying to balance "take the MCAT before apps" and "take the MCAT after all relevant prereqs" but the only way to do it is to take a gap year for no reason other than the timing of the test. If I have to choose, what's most important (or is a gap the only option)?
I am always utterly astounded by supposedly high achieving students who assume a self-imposed timetable for applying, do not understand the process well enough to realize how much time they need to complete finishing prereqs, MCAT prep, and filling out in a highly polished way, the AMCAS Primary Application and 10-25 additional secondary applications, the reality of the chances and competition that getting an acceptee truly is

Here is my reasoning in outline form of what applicants should prioritize

Applying to Med School means:
*Illuminating your positives
*Minimizing your negatives
*Optimizing your chances with timing
*Reducing your risks
*Efficiency in doing your application
*Being the strongest first time applicant

The MCAT:
*Is weighted as much as GPA
*Should be considered at least a 6 credit course in time and work load
*Will stay with your forever
*Risk should be reduced by having the prereqs completed and sufficient time, energy, and focus to do well on it once

Filing out the Applications:
*is the AMCAS primary and 10-25 supplemental applications
*that need to be coherent, concise and compelling
*completed with high quality and in a highly polished way
*Has lengthy transcript entries, ECs and many, many multiple essays
*Should be considered a nearly full-time job from mid-May thru at least mid August
*Be completed early in the cyclr as to give applicants the most optimal timing

The data on applicants include:
*15 is the average number of applications
*40% with 3.8 GPA or higher dont get an acceptance
*60% with 3.6-3.8 GPA dont get an acceptance
*20% with MCAT 517 or higher dont get acceptance
*nearly 50% of matriculants get a single offer of acceptance
*So nearly 1/2 of acceptees have a 7% acceptance rate
*about 60% of matriculants took a gap year

Therefore in priorities:
*Complete prereqs and focus on GPA before attempting MCAT
*Put nearly 100% time, energy and focus into MCAT for 6-12 weeks or more. Complete the MCAT before starting AMCAS, optimally before the application cycle begins
*Put nearly 100% of time, energy and focus into the actual applications
*Begin application prep weeks or months before they open (Jan of application year)

So, as data suggests, the majority of successful applicants took a gap year.
 
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Goro

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I am always utterly astounded by supposedly high achieving students who assume a self-imposed timetable for applying, do not understand the process well enough to realize how much time they need to complete finishing prereqs, MCAT prep, and filling out in a highly polished way, the AMCAS Primary Application and 10-25 additional secondary applications, the reality of the chances and competition that getting an acceptee truly is

Here is my reasoning in outline form of what applicants should prioritize

Applying to Med School means:
Illuminating your positives
Minimizing your negatives
Optimizing your chances with timing
Reducing your risks
Efficiency in doing your application
Being the strongest first time applicant

The MCAT:
Is weighted as much as GPA
Should be considered at least a 6 credit course in time and work load
Will stay with your forever
Risk should be reduced by having the prereqs completed and sufficient time, energy, and focus to do well on it once

Filing out the Applications:
is the AMCAS primary and 10-25 supplemental applications
that need to be coherent, concise and compelling
completed with high quality and in a highly polished way
Has lengthy transcript entries, ECs and many, many multiple essays
Should be considered a nearly full-time job from mid-May thru at least mid August
Be completed early as to give applicants the most optimal cycle

The data on applicants include:
15 is the average number of applications
40% with 3.8 GPA or higher dont get an acceptance
60% with 3.6-3.8 GPA dont get an acceptance
20% with MCAT 517 or higher dont get acceptance
nearly 50% of matriculants get a single offer of acceptance
So nearly 1/2 of acceptees have a 7% acceptance rate
about 60% of matriculants took a gap year

Therefore in priorities:
Complete prereqs and focus on GPA before attempting MCAT
Put nearly 100% time, energy and focus into MCAT for 6-12 weeks or more
Put nearly 100% of time, energy and focus into the actual applications
Begin application prep weeks or months before they open (Jan of application year)

So, as data suggests, the majority of successful applicants took a gap year.
This advice isn't merely golden....it's platinum!
To the list add:
Invest in MSAR Online
Pay very careful attention to the IS/OOS ratios of schools, particularly, public ones
Pay very careful attention to the 10-90th %iles for stats
Do NOT use USN&WR rankings to pick a school list
Visit the Admissions websites of EVERY school you're interested in, and look at FAQs, requirements and mission statements
 

gonnif

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This advice isn't merely golden....it's platinum!
To the list add:
Invest in MSAR Online
Pay very careful attention to the IS/OOS ratios of schools, particularly, public ones
Pay very careful attention to the 10-90th %iles for stats
Do NOT use USN&WR rankings to pick a school list
Visit the Admissions websites of EVERY school you're interested in, and look at FAQs, requirements and mission statements
i will have to add the above all important school selection criteria that my esteemed colleague from west of st. Louis has so eloquently ourlined above
 

AnatomyGrey12

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And my point is the time you spent getting AMCAS and rest ready before the MCAT may have been better spent preparing for the exam. the long term risk is that a poor MCAT score will stay with you forever and applicants need to see this process in terms of risk and optomizing chances
My only caveat to add would be that some people who use this strategy only start the application after the test has been taken and they are just waiting for the score.
 

gonnif

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My only caveat to add would be that some people who use this strategy only start the application after the test has been taken and they are just waiting for the score.
True but I had 3 advisees this cycle do so and all had lower than expected MCAT scores needing to withdraw from the single throwaway school. Frankly, I am becoming of the opinion that no student should be allowed to log on to AMCAS until there is an MCAT score present.
 

AnatomyGrey12

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True but I had 3 advisees this cycle do so and all had lower than expected MCAT scores needing to withdraw from the single throwaway school. Frankly, I am becoming of the opinion that no student should be allowed to log on to AMCAS until there is an MCAT score present.
Yeah I can definitely see how it hurts a lot more applicants than it helps.
 
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gonnif

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Yeah I can definitely see how it hurts a lot more applicants than it helps.
And I am firm believer in reducing risk in this process. I yield the floor
 

Raryn

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just as a lesson here for future readers of the thread; applying to medical school without having an acceptable MCAT is one of the top ten premed mistakes. I am not a fan of any student working on AMCAS until they have an MCAT score. I also not a big fan of single "throwaway school" for verification of an AMCAS while waiting for MCAT score as applicants are then splitting their time, energy, and focus between the primary and MCAT. This was born out to me today when 3 advisees who took this route got their scores today. All 3 were well below expectations and will not be applying this cycle. At least they only had submitted to a single school so there is little worry on reapplicant status

to reiterate, the MCAT is so vital to an application that no student really considering working on the AMCAS until the MCAT is taken and a score recieved. Those try to fit in hard coursework, MCAT, and AMCAS at end of junior year maybe well advised to consider delaying until the next cycle to apply
I would disagree, though it's been a number of years since this applied to me, so if the timelines have changed I might be wrong.

I took the MCAT in late May, about 2 weeks after the end of my Junior year of college. AMCAS opened a week or so later, but I didn't get my score until almost the end of June. I submitted my AMCAS the day I received my MCAT score... and then my transcript took a number of weeks to be verified. On the other hand, people who submitted their AMCAS the day it opened had their transcripts verified that week (before the backlog built up). Had I done the "finish AMCAS and send it to a single school that you're going to apply to no matter what" strategy, I would have had a complete primary on the day that my MCAT score came back, rather than 3 weeks later. For example, I would have applied to my local med school no matter what my MCAT score was, so I'd have been much better off submitting my applications there.

For the OP, I wouldn't advise him to withdraw. He's already spent the money on his primary and secondary applications, and even if he withdraws now, he'll be a reapplicant to those schools. Chances might be low, but what's the harm in riding the cycle out while studying for the MCAT again?
 

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It's going to be hard for us to really advise you without actually knowing your score. However, if you have already submitted, then trying to retake in a month or so might be your best bet. The problem with this is that you need to be able to identify what went wrong and, more importantly, correct it the second time around. What were your practice test scores? Were these good and your actual score just took a nose dive? Or were they not great and you took it anyway? How are you going to change your approach this time around?

FYI to others reading this, this exact scenario is why it's best to take your MCAT before the application season or submit to only one school until you know your score.
Is there a button I can press to just dislike all of the posts suggesting that OP retake the MCAT again this year?
 
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Don't give these guys your score, man. Just retake the test if you're unhappy with the results. Your score, your business. Good luck.

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PreMedMissteps

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Harshness alert!

You're doing everything wrong. Pause. Why are you in such a hurry to fail? This cycle is like a train-wreck in motion.

You're looking frantic and (sorry to say) immature. Sounds like you took 2 exams, one after the other, with little assurance that you'd do much better than the first.

There is no MCAT in October. Even if there were one, you're not likely going to be ready. About a month ago, you said that you applied to one school for verification. You were advised not to apply to more without knowing your new score. Sounds like you went ahead and applied to more and submitted their secondaries.

At this point, you're likely going to have a failed cycle. I'm not sure what withdrawing does. Does it make a difference if you fail or withdraw? Anyone know?

Do not take any more MCAT exams until you know that you can score at least a 508...probably higher since you have two low ones to overcome.

Are you feeling family pressure to go to med school next year? Is that what's going on?
 
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SadAsian

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Do not retake your exam in a month or even three.

I essentially "bombed" my first MCAT. I went about it completely wrong, was rushed by my parents to go into med school immediately after college, but I told them to shove it and took my time. I wish I had done so PRE MCAT, rather than after.
I waited a year to retake my MCAT because there was no chance in hell I was ready to increase my score to what I wanted it to be in one-two-three-four months. I increased my score by 12 points after studying EXTENSIVELY for four months after I graduated from college.

YOU ARE NOT IN A RUSH. Medical school is incredibly competitive. This is single-handedly the most important exam of your premed career. Take your time and prepare. You will not regret it if you commit several months of completely or near uninterrupted study to a test of such significance.
 
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meraki_soul

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Do not retake your exam in a month or even three.

I essentially "bombed" my first MCAT. I went about it completely wrong, was rushed by my parents to go into med school immediately after college, but I told them to shove it and took my time. I wish I had done so PRE MCAT, rather than after.
I waited a year to retake my MCAT because there was no chance in hell I was ready to increase my score to what I wanted it to be in one-two-three-four months. I increased my score by 12 points after studying EXTENSIVELY for four months after I graduated from college.

YOU ARE NOT IN A RUSH. Medical school is incredibly competitive. This is single-handedly the most important exam of your premed career. Take your time and prepare. You will not regret it if you commit several months of completely or near uninterrupted study to a test of such significance.
would you be willing to share what your MCAT stats were and what you did to improve it?
 
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