know of a website that shows med schools and their Step I/II scores?

Feb 9, 2013
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anybody know of the website/URL of all the medical schools that show their Step 1 and Step 2 scores every year?

I cant seem to find it, any help would be awesome
 

PreMedOrDead

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Such a site doesn't exist.
I am not of a website like this. However, there was a post a while ago that listed Step I averages at all of the schools that publicized it. You can search for it, or maybe some kind soul will post the link...
 
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Feb 9, 2013
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thanks for the replies, so its basically looking for an unicorn

I just ask because one of my ex-classmates talked about his med school (University of southern california) having a higher Step 1 score than some of the medical schools ranked higher than USC. I was curious where he got that info, unless if he is making it up to make himself feel better (not that USC's med school is bad or anything)
 

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thanks for the replies, so its basically looking for an unicorn

I just ask because one of my ex-classmates talked about his med school (University of southern california) having a higher Step 1 score than some of the medical schools ranked higher than USC. I was curious where he got that info, unless if he is making it up to make himself feel better (not that USC's med school is bad or anything)
Schools tacitly agree not to share this info because it impacts how they structure teaching, in terms of PBL, early clinical rotations, etc and they don't want to be forced to "teach to the boards". So schools officially don't post these. Plus there aren't really commonly agreed upon rules in terms of how they list failures and retakes, etc. So I think your ex classmate was making up info. He could be right -- but he can't know that. The best you might find are informally compiled lists that depend on the accuracy of 130 posters at 130 different schools, all with an incentive to make their program sound better. Don't bother with this.
 

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thanks for the replies, so its basically looking for an unicorn

I just ask because one of my ex-classmates talked about his med school (University of southern california) having a higher Step 1 score than some of the medical schools ranked higher than USC. I was curious where he got that info, unless if he is making it up to make himself feel better (not that USC's med school is bad or anything)
Some schools will tell their students what the average score was for that year. If you have friends at other schools you can compare with them. Otherwise there isn't a way to know

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MrChance2

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I know this information for just a few schools and there is not that much of a difference at all in the competitiveness of the school's admission vs step 1 avg for the US MD schools I know about. I agree it should be a non-issue when deciding on where to go.
 

PreMedOrDead

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My favorite is the fact that even the 'worst' medical schools in the country all have 'higher than average' Step I scores. :confused:
 

Law2Doc

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Why in God's name would you ever want this list to begin with?
Presumably the OP believes that good scores indicates something about the quality of the school. I would suggest it probably tells you more about the admissions process, because the guy who is going to score 250 is going to put himself in a position to do that no matter where he goes. Med school isn't going to make you a high or low scorer. Thats more about your own work ethic, aptitude and attitude. Heck, half the people in most classes will skip lecture and learn the info on their own -- hard to credit a med school with anything they achieve when they spend all their lecture hours reading at Starbucks. The only thing programs might do that can impact these scores are (1) offer prep courses, which tend not to be popular at the better ranked programs, and (2) give you more time off before step 1, (3) teach to the boards -- a popular concept at offshore schools where you basically learn what's in First Aid and little else, and (4) have a good comfortable library open 24-7, a local quiet coffee shop or other locale conducive to settling in for intense study sessions daily. Beyond that it's up to you.
 

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Why in God's name would you ever want this list to begin with?
Sheer curiosity, I'd imagine. Same reason I'd like to see that list, as would many/most people on here. What the person chooses to do with that information (I would recommend doing absolutely nothing with it) is their own choice.
 
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yeah SOMBound13, its something like this, though there is not a link that I can find where that got from. I am not choosing my medical school I would like to attend based on these scores but it can somewhat tell how the students fare, especially if you are looking for the higher specialities. Either way attending the best school with the highest Step I/II score doesn't guarantee I will be a neurosurgeon or dermatologist, just curious about these scores.
 

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While there is no website with this info, this data obviously does exist at AAMC/USMLE and is available to researchers.

How much do differences in medical schools influence student performance? where "Methods: Using Association of American Medical Colleges and USMLE longitudinal data for 116 medical schools, hierarchical linear modeling was used to study the effects of school variables on Step 1-3. "


USMLEworld summarized/reviewed this as article basically saying 85% of variation was in scores were traceable to the test taking abilities of incoming students (MCAT and USMLE correlation). Furthermore little of the other 15% could be attributed to curriculum or school level-educational policies.

see below for complete review article

How much is my performance on the USMLE exams affected by the medical school I attend?

A variety of factors go into a student's choice of medical school. Schools vary in geographic location, curriculum, teaching quality, and reputation. It is difficult to compare medical schools in overall quality, except in the form of published rankings, which are of questionable validity. It is also unclear if differences between medical schools significantly impact a student's eventual performance in clinical situations or on standardized tests.

A 2008 study compared USMLE scores across multiple medical schools. Overall USMLE scores did vary among institutions, as would be expected. However, the majority of these differences could be accounted for by differences in incoming students, particularly MCAT scores. In other words, schools admitting students who are better test-takers tended to have higher average USMLE scores. Approximately 85% of the variation between schools can be traced to this variation among incoming students.

Only about 15% of the variation in USMLE score across different medical schools could be traced to factors related to the school itself. Little of this difference could be traced to differences in curriculum or school level-educational policies. Private school students tended to perform better on Step 1 but worse on Step 3. The geographic location of the school also impacted scores. This study did not directly address the quality of teaching that students receive, in part because this is difficult to assess and quantify. Overall these findings suggest that the majority of variation in USMLE performance among different schools is likely secondary to traits that the students bring into the medical school environment, rather than differences between medical schools themselves.
Reference

Hecker K, Violato C. How Much Do Differences in Medical Schools Affect Student Performance? A Longitudinal Study Employing Hierarchical Linear Modeling. Teaching and Learning in Medicine 20(2), 2008, 104-113.
 

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While there is no website with this info, this data obviously does exist at AAMC/USMLE and is available to researchers.

How much do differences in medical schools influence student performance? where "Methods: Using Association of American Medical Colleges and USMLE longitudinal data for 116 medical schools, hierarchical linear modeling was used to study the effects of school variables on Step 1-3. "


USMLEworld summarized/reviewed this as article basically saying 85% of variation was in scores were traceable to the test taking abilities of incoming students (MCAT and USMLE correlation). Furthermore little of the other 15% could be attributed to curriculum or school level-educational policies.

see below for complete review article

How much is my performance on the USMLE exams affected by the medical school I attend?

A variety of factors go into a student's choice of medical school. Schools vary in geographic location, curriculum, teaching quality, and reputation. It is difficult to compare medical schools in overall quality, except in the form of published rankings, which are of questionable validity. It is also unclear if differences between medical schools significantly impact a student's eventual performance in clinical situations or on standardized tests.

A 2008 study compared USMLE scores across multiple medical schools. Overall USMLE scores did vary among institutions, as would be expected. However, the majority of these differences could be accounted for by differences in incoming students, particularly MCAT scores. In other words, schools admitting students who are better test-takers tended to have higher average USMLE scores. Approximately 85% of the variation between schools can be traced to this variation among incoming students.

Only about 15% of the variation in USMLE score across different medical schools could be traced to factors related to the school itself. Little of this difference could be traced to differences in curriculum or school level-educational policies. Private school students tended to perform better on Step 1 but worse on Step 3. The geographic location of the school also impacted scores. This study did not directly address the quality of teaching that students receive, in part because this is difficult to assess and quantify. Overall these findings suggest that the majority of variation in USMLE performance among different schools is likely secondary to traits that the students bring into the medical school environment, rather than differences between medical schools themselves.
Reference

Hecker K, Violato C. How Much Do Differences in Medical Schools Affect Student Performance? A Longitudinal Study Employing Hierarchical Linear Modeling. Teaching and Learning in Medicine 20(2), 2008, 104-113.
Thanks for this. :thumbup: Hopefully this will set a lot of users at ease with regards to school choice.
 

gonnif

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I would really love that data.
Anyone can request data from AAMC (go the the AAMC FACTS page). However, they now charge for specialized reports. several years ago (like 2005) they still gave away the data upon request and I got a 40,000 row spread sheet with several hundred columns showing all the applicant matriculant data. The damn thing was like 8000 pages.

The NRMP data for each year includes just about everything except this. I vaguely recall buried in one of the reports one year was showing the number from each school into each specialty (not specific programs but the specialty in general), This is being written before coffee and 2 nites of little sleep so dont hold me to that recollection.