OofWillis

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I recently read an article saying that by 2015 there needs to be more medical schools and that current medical schools need to increase their enrollment by some percentage. Do you think this will affect us 2007 applicants at all? (i.e., an increased chance of getting accepted)
 

sentrosi

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http://www.aamc.org/newsroom/pressrel/2006/060619.htm
???

Anyway. Yeah...I don't think the increase is going to be very big each year. I think the overall total of med students rises a bit every year. So probably not going to be too big a difference for 2007 even if they start following the AAMC recommendation.
 

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We had an acceptance luncheon for the students admitted to the Univ of Mississippi, and we talked about this.

Our class size jumped from 100 to 105 to 110 for my class in an effort to increase the number of doctors. The admissions guy said that they couldn't go any higher right now for several reasons inlcuding the lack of lab stations.
 
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Law2Doc

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Sondra said:
We had an acceptance luncheon for the students admitted to the Univ of Mississippi, and we talked about this.

Our class size jumped from 100 to 105 to 110 for my class in an effort to increase the number of doctors. The admissions guy said that they couldn't go any higher right now for several reasons inlcuding the lack of lab stations.
Agree -- most schools jumped up a handful of seats this current year, but a lot cannot go further without building more infrastructure (i.e. bigger classrooms). So expect the size of next year's class to closely mirror the incoming one, unless you see a lot of construction going on on campus.
 

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OofWillis said:
I recently read an article saying that by 2015 there needs to be more medical schools and that current medical schools need to increase their enrollment by some percentage. Do you think this will affect us 2007 applicants at all? (i.e., an increased chance of getting accepted)
i think i just "got" your username: O = circle ==> circle of willis; clever :laugh:
 

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Law2Doc said:
Agree -- most schools jumped up a handful of seats this current year, but a lot cannot go further without building more infrastructure (i.e. bigger classrooms). So expect the size of next year's class to closely mirror the incoming one, unless you see a lot of construction going on on campus.
I think they can squish the desks closer, but I was told (I think LizzyM mentioned this) that it's really hard to make room for more clinical rotations in a hospital.
 

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For Georgia residents, the legislature (who controls MCGs class size) mandated that we take 5% more students starting with the class of 2010... so that's 10 extra seats that opened this year(Went from 180 to 190).

Also, there is a new private med school that's going to open in Savannah in the next couple of years (so if you are a freshman or sophomore, you might be able to apply to it).
 

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TheProwler said:
I think they can squish the desks closerl.
A some places I've seen you have everything bolted together-- There is no opportunity to squish. All you can do is wait out the first two weeks until people start cutting class. But exams are still a problem. But you're right, adjustments have to get made at both the basic science and clinical rotation levels. The rotations are not the first hurdle you hit though - it's still 2 years off from any increase.
 

jackieMD2007

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TheProwler said:
I think they can squish the desks closer, but I was told (I think LizzyM mentioned this) that it's really hard to make room for more clinical rotations in a hospital.
I would be willing to sit on some hot guys' lap. I don't need my own desk.

Can I get a witness? :laugh: :thumbup:
 
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OofWillis

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jackieMD2007 said:
I would be willing to sit on some hot guys' lap. I don't need my own desk.

Can I get a witness? :laugh: :thumbup:
:laugh: I think you might have just single-handedly solved the AAMC's dilemma with class size! Speaking as a guy, I'm sure med school would be a lot better with a hot girl on my lap. :D
 

jackieMD2007

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OofWillis said:
:laugh: I think you might have just single-handedly solved the AAMC's dilemma with class size! Speaking as a guy, I'm sure med school would be a lot better with a hot girl on my lap. :D
Hey, I try to solve problems whereever possible. After attending the University of California, maybe my ideas are too liberal for medical school, but haha they are an interesting solution, no? :thumbup:
 

maestro1625

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Church said:
For Georgia residents, the legislature (who controls MCGs class size) mandated that we take 5% more students starting with the class of 2010... so that's 10 extra seats that opened this year(Went from 180 to 190).

Also, there is a new private med school that's going to open in Savannah in the next couple of years (so if you are a freshman or sophomore, you might be able to apply to it).
yeah, I think new med schools is going to be the solution more than increasing class sizes. Michigan State, for example is opening up it's third med school in the next couple years.
 

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I think that whole AAMC thing was just a recommendation, schools don't necessarily have to increase class sizes. It sounds like some are choosing to, though.

Personally I don't think this is a good idea anyway. How is having more doctors going to change the DISTRIBUTION? What makes these folks think the extra seats are going to train docs that are going to practice in rural and underserved areas instead of the usual Boston, SF, NY, etc?
 

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modelslashactor said:
I think that whole AAMC thing was just a recommendation, schools don't necessarily have to increase class sizes. It sounds like some are choosing to, though.

Personally I don't think this is a good idea anyway. How is having more doctors going to change the DISTRIBUTION? What makes these folks think the extra seats are going to train docs that are going to practice in rural and underserved areas instead of the usual Boston, SF, NY, etc?
More students = more tuition, federal funding etc., so most schools are happy to squeeze in more if they can.
It won't change the distribution immediately -- but what it will do is force more people to take residency spots out of the prime areas, since the spots in Boston, NY, SF etc are finite in number -- those non-prime slots that previously went to, eg. carribean students and the like will now get competed for. So the non-US students who previously filled up these less desirable slots are going to get hit with a squeeze (which may be the hidden goal of some of the instigators of this system - to have US schools fill US needs). If more funded residency positions ever come, they presumably will be allocated to the underserved, less desirable, areas, and the non-US docs may continue to fill the gaps and get squeezed to there, which solves the problem. But again, this all depends on the residency funding and that it gets sent to the right places.
 

modelslashactor

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Interesting point, but what's stopping these people from moving to the city or suburbs once they finish their residency?
 

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modelslashactor said:
Interesting point, but what's stopping these people from moving to the city or suburbs once they finish their residency?
Nothing, but that gives the nation the 3-5 more years of residency time to address the problem before getting accused of doing nothing. By this time, if universal health coverage of some form ever comes, these underserved poor will have insurance coverage for healthcare, and some docs are going to set up in those areas and make a nice reimbursement driven income.
 

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OofWillis said:
I recently read an article saying that by 2015 there needs to be more medical schools and that current medical schools need to increase their enrollment by some percentage. Do you think this will affect us 2007 applicants at all? (i.e., an increased chance of getting accepted)
Our MS1 class is 10% bigger than last year's class, so yeah, you may expect marginal increases in acceptance chances, depending on which schools you are applying to. This, however, assumes that you are near the border of what is acceptable at those schools, and that the total number of applicants doesn't increase significantly.

Interestingly, our class is 10% bigger, but didn't have the (feared) drops in stats asssociated with having to increase the class size. So in one sense, it was just as hard to get into my class as it was to get into last year's class, despite the increase in size.
 

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odrade1 said:
Interestingly, our class is 10% bigger, but didn't have the (feared) drops in stats asssociated with having to increase the class size. So in one sense, it was just as hard to get into my class as it was to get into last year's class, despite the increase in size.
Sadly, I suspect that the glut of recent TV shows (Grays Anatomy, House, etc) got more people to apply premed this past year, augmenting the applicant pool. So a lot of schools increased by as much as 10% but the applicant pool grew significantly too. Expect matriculant stats to continue climbing.
 

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What would, say, doubling the number of doctors do to salary and and job security? I've been through two rounds of layoffs in my life (thank you, dotcom bubble). The first one forced me to take about a half cut in pay. The second didn't hit me, but did affect many of my friends at work. So, the salary and job security of being a Doc are appealing aspects of the profession(certainly not the only). Do any of you econ majors or other smart folk have some insight on this?
 

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modelslashactor said:
How is having more doctors going to change the DISTRIBUTION? What makes these folks think the extra seats are going to train docs that are going to practice in rural and underserved areas instead of the usual Boston, SF, NY, etc?
Brings up an interesting point.

Florida's solution to a potential doctor shortage is to increase med school enrollment and med schools. FIU and UCF are developing med schools to be built in less than 5 years. As far as rural and underserved areas in FL are concerned, this solution falls short of the goal. I imagine in a state like FL, where there are many opportunities to practice in any specialty, most med residents in FL stay in FL to practice. However, those who do leave will have more people leaving with them as malpractice laws are continuosly passed. In 2004, voters approved a three strikes and your out (three malpractice judgements =loss of license) amendment. This applies to any specialty from those incurring minimal daily risk to those conducting high risk procedures. Why, as a neurosurgeon, would a FL resident choose to practice in a state where three mistakes over an entire career results in unemployment?

Good recommendation by the AAMC, but more legal protection is needed for physicians, especially those in high risk specialties.
 

modelslashactor

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GoodDoc, it will take A LOT of forces to threaten job security of doctors, no matter how crappy the conditions people will still be getting sick. However, since reimbursements are already dropping we kind of know going in to expect at least some income insecurity. This is a whole other debate, but frankly I think some specialties are grossly overpaid and deserve to lose more ground than others, but some certainly can't afford to lose much more in terms of income before medicine is barely worth it economically.

I know very little about economics, so take all this for what little it's worth, but I think medicine is as good an area to be as any in the current job market. Income and security can't be beat, and at least you know your job will never go overseas (unless you're a radiologist, but don't bet on that either). Not to mention the work is stimulating and rewarding, if it's what you're into.
 
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