imtheman25

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Jul 25, 2014
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I am curious to know how many of you genuinely enjoy learning the basic sciences, medical social sciences, etc for the sake of learning or intellectual curiosity? Do you seem to be seeing a lack of this behavior in your peers? I am trying to adopt this mental philosophy (no more of the undergrad bs of learning to get that 100%) but it seems harder than expected.
 

sholamd

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Jun 27, 2015
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Sincerely, I have come to love learning for the sake of learning. Because it's never just for the sake of learning - there's always a patient, an actual human being, at the other end of that process. I wrote an article about it on KevinMD a while back, and I'll just paste in a little excerpt because I think it really explained my sentiment well:

"As physicians, we are trusted, privileged, honored with the most valuable and precious commodity in society: an individual’s health. Sure, the nurse practitioners, respiratory therapists, psychologists and others can give accurate and appropriate medical advice, but when questions get difficult, the MDs are called in. We are called not because of our ability to declutter, but because of our ability to retain, analyze, and consider the minutiae. We are called because we spent years learning the low-yield. Many health care providers can tell you that mitochondria make energy for a cell, but when a patient wants to know why her son has strokes, I’ll be glad I can explain mitochondrial cytopathies like MELAS."

It's definitely hard to practice this on a daily basis because even in med school we get totally focused on the 100% like you said, but it gets much easier once you are seeing patients every day and remembering why we learn all this crazy stuff...
 

Goro

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Jun 10, 2010
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I have found that my top students have the attitude of loving learning for learning's sake, and despite all we throw at that, they still like learning new things.

I am curious to know how many of you genuinely enjoy learning the basic sciences, medical social sciences, etc for the sake of learning or intellectual curiosity? Do you seem to be seeing a lack of this behavior in your peers? I am trying to adopt this mental philosophy (no more of the undergrad bs of learning to get that 100%) but it seems harder than expected.
 
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Phloston

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Jan 17, 2012
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I am curious to know how many of you genuinely enjoy learning the basic sciences, medical social sciences, etc for the sake of learning or intellectual curiosity? Do you seem to be seeing a lack of this behavior in your peers? I am trying to adopt this mental philosophy (no more of the undergrad bs of learning to get that 100%) but it seems harder than expected.
It's a good question you ask. I think many people have different motivations behind their ambition. Is the ambition because one is genuinely driven by the career, or is there another reason, such as unknowingly seeking parental approval. I don't think anyone could successfully manage a medical career if he or she isn't passionate about learning. But there is definitely a spectrum. I do think students who aren't excited to study the material are in the wrong career.
 
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imtheman25

imtheman25

2+ Year Member
Jul 25, 2014
125
154
Status
Medical Student
Sincerely, I have come to love learning for the sake of learning. Because it's never just for the sake of learning - there's always a patient, an actual human being, at the other end of that process. I wrote an article about it on KevinMD a while back, and I'll just paste in a little excerpt because I think it really explained my sentiment well:

"As physicians, we are trusted, privileged, honored with the most valuable and precious commodity in society: an individual’s health. Sure, the nurse practitioners, respiratory therapists, psychologists and others can give accurate and appropriate medical advice, but when questions get difficult, the MDs are called in. We are called not because of our ability to declutter, but because of our ability to retain, analyze, and consider the minutiae. We are called because we spent years learning the low-yield. Many health care providers can tell you that mitochondria make energy for a cell, but when a patient wants to know why her son has strokes, I’ll be glad I can explain mitochondrial cytopathies like MELAS."

It's definitely hard to practice this on a daily basis because even in med school we get totally focused on the 100% like you said, but it gets much easier once you are seeing patients every day and remembering why we learn all this crazy stuff...
Do you have a link to this article?
 
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imtheman25

imtheman25

2+ Year Member
Jul 25, 2014
125
154
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Medical Student
It's a good question you ask. I think many people have different motivations behind their ambition. Is the ambition because one is genuinely driven by the career, or is there another reason, such as unknowingly seeking parental approval. I don't think anyone could successfully manage a medical career if he or she isn't passionate about learning. But there is definitely a spectrum. I do think students who aren't excited to study the material are in the wrong career.
Thanks Phloston! btw im a big fan of your PEARLS of Wisdom!
 

OnePunchBiopsy

General Surgery
Feb 3, 2014
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I am curious to know how many of you genuinely enjoy learning the basic sciences, medical social sciences, etc for the sake of learning or intellectual curiosity? Do you seem to be seeing a lack of this behavior in your peers? I am trying to adopt this mental philosophy (no more of the undergrad bs of learning to get that 100%) but it seems harder than expected.
It's perfectly normal to not care for certain subjects. I also sometimes found it hard to love learning for the sake of learning, especially in second year during the Step 1 grind.

It helps to remind yourself that one day you will be taking care of living people, and you want to keep them living. Keeping the health of your future patients in mind will help boost your desire to learn for the sake of learning!
 

MelMcT2009

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Jul 22, 2016
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I love learning, but medical school has limited that a lot. I like to dig really deep into topics, and often find myself going down "bunny trails", but there just isn't enough time to do this in med school due to the volume of material there is.
 

IslandStyle808

Akuma residency or bust!
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Aug 5, 2012
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I am one of those weirdoes that loves "learning how to learn." Would read up on all the books as to how to effectively go through information and how to retain it (before and during medial school). It has definitely been helpful. Even if it didn't benefit my medical education, I would still be doing it.
 

FourniersGreenGang

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Oct 19, 2015
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I have found that my top students have the attitude of loving learning for learning's sake, and despite all we throw at that, they still like learning new things.
I'll back you up on this. I'm consistently in the top of my class and I attribute that to a legitimate joy of learning for the fun of it. I think this is an important mindset to have for success in med school. It certainly makes it more enjoyable.
 

CherryRedDracul

The Sunlight Burns
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Oct 12, 2012
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I love learning, but medical school has limited that a lot. I like to dig really deep into topics, and often find myself going down "bunny trails", but there just isn't enough time to do this in med school due to the volume of material there is.
I still go down "bunny trails" regardless. I never studied just for the sake of an exam. I'd rather enjoy my studying than focus solely on getting good grades ... but I looked for that middle ground. I agree with FourniersGreenGang that being able to enjoy studying is large part of why I did well in med school.
 
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MelMcT2009

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Jul 22, 2016
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I still go down "bunny trails" regardless. I never studied just for the sake of an exam. I'd rather enjoy my studying than focus solely on getting good grades ... but I looked for that middle ground. I agree with FourniersGreenGang that being able to enjoy studying is large part of why I did well in med school.
I definitely still go on bunny trails (way too often), Im just not able to do it as often as I'd like (especially true when studying for step). I too was at the top of my class, though, and agree 100%. The bunny trails are the reason I was able to learn the topics so well.
 

Entadus

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The expression is 'rabbit hole' but this is good too :laugh: