Less prestigous school = Less competitive residency??

Discussion in 'Clinical Rotations' started by mistirvr, Mar 19, 2002.

  1. mistirvr

    mistirvr Member
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    Does anyone believe that graduating from a smaller or lesser-known medical school has been detrimental in your pursuit of a competitive residency? I will be attending osteopathic school, but am interested in everyone's opinion.

    Thanks,
    Melissa :)
     
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  2. Jim Picotte

    Jim Picotte Senior Member
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    Well we'll see exactly where I end up at, but I'm from Michigan State--CHM and I don't know where we stack up compared to other medical schools but I know we're not as well known U of Michigan and I was able to get into radiology. Most of our class gets their top choice, but so does 70% of 4th year med students. The only caveat is that it will be more difficult to get into some specialties as a DO. There certainly is some regional bias (much easier to get a residency in the same state, region as your med school) but really, I think that anyone from any medical school should be able to get into a great residency if they really apply themselves and work hard.
     
  3. nyskindr

    nyskindr Senior Member
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    There is no doubt that graduating from a very top level school is a big plus when applying for residency at highly prestigious hospitals or competitive specialties.The ability to make contacts with well known professors is helpful.Residency programs understand how selective places like Stanford are.Once you get out of the top 15-20 or so med schools the match lists start to look very similar in overall quality ,at that level individual factors take over and grades,boards,research and personality will mostly determine success.I can tell you that last year at least in Dermatology (a super competitive field)applicants got in from a wide variety of US med schools all over the map.Additionally there may be other issues for Osteopathic grads to consider but I feel the above is true for most allopathic schools.
     
  4. neutropeniaboy

    neutropeniaboy Blasted ENT Attending
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    </font><blockquote><font size="1" face="Verdana, Helvetica, sans-serif">quote:</font><hr /><font size="2" face="Verdana, Helvetica, sans-serif">Originally posted by mistirvr:
    <strong>Does anyone believe that graduating from a smaller or lesser-known medical school has been detrimental in your pursuit of a competitive residency? I will be attending osteopathic school, but am interested in everyone's opinion.

    Thanks,
    Melissa :) </strong></font><hr /></blockquote><font size="2" face="Verdana, Helvetica, sans-serif">I think this depends on the institution and the type of residency, and it always depends on the nature of the candidate himself.

    All one can do is speculate about this. Certainly if you had two identical candidates -- one coming from Harvard and one coming from MCP or NYM -- and administrators were blind to the school of origin, accepting one or the other would seemingly be a difficult decision. However, we all know that the Harvard individual would most likely be taken if the schools were known.

    But take another scenario: two identical candidates. One is from Harvard and one is from UCSF. The residency spot is at Irvine. UCSF is probably going to win because of regional similarities, contacts, references that are known, etc.

    The nature of the beast is highly political. Certain programs are friendly to certain schools. Certain programs absolutely would prefer NOT to have someone on the faculty or staff who comes from a particular institution.

    If you have your way, go to the school with the better reputation (if their cirricula are comparable). Don't cripple yourself before you even get to school.
     
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  5. Whisker Barrel Cortex

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    I think being from a top school does give you a little bit of an edge if all other factors are equal. However, the effect of geography and familiarity should not be discounted as factors.

    As an aside, there is a study released this month in the journal Academic Radiologist that studied factors that predicted performance on the Radiology Board exams and on residency rotations. They found some correlation between Honors in preclinial courses and radiology board scores. Honors in Medicine and Surgery rotations were also predictive of good scores. USMLE scores showed the same trend. However, they found that AOA status and prestige of medical school had no impact on radiology board scores at all. Oddly enough, none of the above factors were associated with higher ratings by attendings on residency rotations.
     

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