Life Crisis, I am getting my PHD in Biochemistry But wanting to change to PharmD

Oct 6, 2009
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My question is this >>> Are there schools which offer accelerated programs to those with masters of science (I just started and can take courses geared to it and possibly transfer credits?). Are they any good. I would like to be somewhere in the northern Midwest. <<<

So, let me tell you a bit about my situation then please anyone respond with help. :scared:

When I was just applying for undergraduate schools I didn't really even think of Pharmacy. I did ALOT of AP credits which I used to get my four year Biotechnology degree done in three years. My GPA was 3.835 (science GPA was higher). So I was 21 when I graduated. I had applied to a few good BioChemistry PHD programs. I didn't get into the ones I wanted because my Advisor went out of the country and didn't get me my recommendation. I even lied to him telling him I needed the recommendation a week earlier then I really needed it. (I should have had the guts to tell him in the first place I wanted some one more reliable to right it, he has a bad track record for laziness.) Anyways, I eventually got into a "newer" Biochemistry PHD program at a large university which is not very well known. While I am getting a rather large stipend I'm still afraid this degree isn't worth it. My other classmates seem incompetent and not ambitious at all.

Currently, I am up nights and days with anxiety about my career. I didn't get into the right schools I wanted. Thus, I fear I have little chance of working in BioPharma as a research scientist. Working in academia is completely not an option for me. I think I will be able to switch departments to the university's Chemistry Department which is some what better known (this year it dropped from about 20th to 35th). I will probably complete the PHD in 4-5 years (I will be 25-26 years old). I most likely will be required to do a 1-3 (I will be 26-29) year post-doc because of the poorer quality university I went to.

As an alternative I am thinking of doing a pharmacy degree as soon as possible. I would feel so much better knowing there is a career after school. I need to take the PCAT therefore I will not be able to register for next year. I should be able to complete my Masters in two years and by that time I will be 23 and ready to register.

Is their any programs which offer an accelerated degree to those which life science masters (Biochemistry, Biological Chemistry). If I could do my pharmD in 2-3 years after the masters I would still be just (25-26 + a year of residency).

I would be willing to work as hard as required to make this happen (Extra classes during masters, along with classes during pharmD).
With a pharmacy degree I still will be able to get to a position somewhat similar to my goal. Without having to worry about a career after school. (pharmacists make pretty decent money even at retail). My aunt after all got her pharmD from MN state University and is a project manager of clinical trials at a large Pharmaceutical/Biopharma Corporation.

Please, get back to me ASAP! I am so sick with worry. I fear I will have no career after this PHD. :(

I can get a list of the courses I have taken already as well. I plan to call random programs to gather more information.
 

wes011

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I was in chemistry graduate school and left after a semester with a 3.70 GPA because I knew getting my PhD in chemistry was not my path in life. Take the PCAT and start applying and see where you land. Some schools do not require the PCAT.

There are 3 year PharmD programs available, however, you would probably have to start with 0 credit hours in the program.

My question is this >>> Are there schools which offer accelerated programs to those with masters of science (I just started and can take courses geared to it and possibly transfer credits?). Are they any good. I would like to be somewhere in the northern Midwest. <<<

So, let me tell you a bit about my situation then please anyone respond with help. :scared:

When I was just applying for undergraduate schools I didn't really even think of Pharmacy. I did ALOT of AP credits which I used to get my four year Biotechnology degree done in three years. My GPA was 3.835 (science GPA was higher). So I was 21 when I graduated. I had applied to a few good BioChemistry PHD programs. I didn't get into the ones I wanted because my Advisor went out of the country and didn't get me my recommendation. I even lied to him telling him I needed the recommendation a week earlier then I really needed it. (I should have had the guts to tell him in the first place I wanted some one more reliable to right it, he has a bad track record for laziness.) Anyways, I eventually got into a "newer" Biochemistry PHD program at a large university which is not very well known. While I am getting a rather large stipend I'm still afraid this degree isn't worth it. My other classmates seem incompetent and not ambitious at all.

Currently, I am up nights and days with anxiety about my career. I didn't get into the right schools I wanted. Thus, I fear I have little chance of working in BioPharma as a research scientist. Working in academia is completely not an option for me. I think I will be able to switch departments to the university's Chemistry Department which is some what better known (this year it dropped from about 20th to 35th). I will probably complete the PHD in 4-5 years (I will be 25-26 years old). I most likely will be required to do a 1-3 (I will be 26-29) year post-doc because of the poorer quality university I went to.

As an alternative I am thinking of doing a pharmacy degree as soon as possible. I would feel so much better knowing there is a career after school. I need to take the PCAT therefore I will not be able to register for next year. I should be able to complete my Masters in two years and by that time I will be 23 and ready to register.

Is their any programs which offer an accelerated degree to those which life science masters (Biochemistry, Biological Chemistry). If I could do my pharmD in 2-3 years after the masters I would still be just (25-26 + a year of residency).

I would be willing to work as hard as required to make this happen (Extra classes during masters, along with classes during pharmD).
With a pharmacy degree I still will be able to get to a position somewhat similar to my goal. Without having to worry about a career after school. (pharmacists make pretty decent money even at retail). My aunt after all got her pharmD from MN state University and is a project manager of clinical trials at a large Pharmaceutical/Biopharma Corporation.

Please, get back to me ASAP! I am so sick with worry. I fear I will have no career after this PHD. :(

I can get a list of the courses I have taken already as well. I plan to call random programs to gather more information.
 
Last edited:

desmoulins45179

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I can get a list of the courses I have taken already as well. I plan to call random programs to gather more information.
If you want some general information about pre-reqs and stuff like that, look at the director on PharmCAS. It lists pre-reqs, class size, pcat requirements, etc. You may still want to talk to someone in the admissions office, but it gives a good overview. Not every college uses pharmcas, but a lot of them do.
http://www.pharmcas.org/collegesschools/directoryalphastate.htm


Also, some pharmacy programs offer a PharmD/PhD program. There are other dual degree programs out there with MBA, MPH, PhD and JD.

However, you shouldn't go into pharmacy just because of job stability. Also, you do not necessarily have to get your masters before applying (unless you want to). It seems like you are looking towards research so maybe you can loook into PharmD/PhD programs.
 
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chaunguyen

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Hi mikejep,
We are on the same boat. I also have the same thought as you do. On the other hand, I do love to work in health care field. I am in my third year of PhD program now. I really wish to get in next year :xf:. I will apply to 12-15 schools, and hopefully, I can get in a few. Good luck to you too.
 
Oct 6, 2009
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So has any one heard of greatly accelerated PharmD degrees for Masters of Science. I plan to call different universities for info as well.
 

koercive

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I'm pretty sure no pharmacy school in the US will accept transfer credits.

you will need to start from the beginning like the rest of us.
 

desmoulins45179

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So has any one heard of greatly accelerated PharmD degrees for Masters of Science. I plan to call different universities for info as well.
Some are accelerated (three years) but most are 4 years. That goes for everyone - you and people who do not have a degree.

However, some schools may accept credits for an equivalent course. For example, if a school requires a biochem course in it's first professional year and you already took a graduate/higher level biochem course then that may be waived.
 

medicalCPA

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And to be nitpicky, MN State University does not have a PharmD program.
 

IrishRxMan

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Either way, if you go to an accelerated 3 year program, you're still doing the work that you do in a 4 year program. It's just accelerated. I can't speak about a school giving you any transfer credit because I am not aware of any, but I'd lean more towards no. Don't let this be your only source of inquiry, ask some schools what they will do for you. If you're in a PhD program and you want to do research, do like has already been brought up. Look into the PharmD/PhD programs out there and apply to them. You will take a little longer, I think, to graduate, but you will also have an easier time getting a job with a big pharma when you're done. The industry needs people that want to work in research because there aren't many out there that do compared to those that want to do other pharmacy jobs.
 

FarscapeGirl

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I just finished a PhD in molecular biology and started pharmacy school this fall. To answer your question, you can't really skip classes because you aren't learning the same things. Sure, some things will be a review for you more than your classmates at least at the beginning, but what you learn in pharmacy school is dramatically different than biochemistry PhD training.

After reading your post, I have some more advice. Really sit down and think what you want out of life. The school matters much less with a PhD program than the adviser you have and the quality of what you publish. Instead of considering pharmacy as a career in pharmacy, you seem to be freaking out about the choice you made and thinking all is lost. Whether you are at a good school or not, you still have to do a post-doc. In these days, if you want to stay in academia, try several post-docs, because there just aren't the jobs.

If you want to stay just in research, stick with the PhD. Finish it, and finish it well. Don't switch to pharmacy just because you don't like the current route you chose to go into research.
 
Oct 6, 2009
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I just finished a PhD in molecular biology and started pharmacy school this fall. To answer your question, you can't really skip classes because you aren't learning the same things. Sure, some things will be a review for you more than your classmates at least at the beginning, but what you learn in pharmacy school is dramatically different than biochemistry PhD training.
What is your plan for a career? Are you planning to do pharmaceutical research work as well? Or are you looking to switch to retail pharm? If I do go to a pharmacy program it will hopefully be the one back home where I did my undergraduate. :idea:


After reading your post, I have some more advice. Really sit down and think what you want out of life. The school matters much less with a PhD program than the adviser you have and the quality of what you publish. Instead of considering pharmacy as a career in pharmacy, you seem to be freaking out about the choice you made and thinking all is lost.
You are right about me freaking out! :scared:
I'm ashamed to admit it, but I just spent the car ride home crying (like a baby). I'm not completely convinced that all PhD degrees are created equal like PharmD. (get your PharmD and you're guaranteed a good job)

If you want to stay just in research, stick with the PhD. Finish it, and finish it well. Don't switch to pharmacy just because you don't like the current route you chose to go into research.
At this point I am more concerned about being able to provide (and do it well) for my future family of little MikeJeps. I will feel like such a failure if I end up doing post doc after post doc just hoping for a break. There is no money in that (in addition to the amount of time I would have to spend away from the fam). I just want to go straight into industry. I have many other skills then just being a damn biochemistry textbook. Some day after putting in my dues I would like to see my self in a managerial position.


Whether you are at a good school or not, you still have to do a post-doc. In these days, if you want to stay in academia, try several post-docs, because there just aren't the jobs.

Trust me, I don't want to work in academia at all it seems like a ponzi scheme. They are continually competing for less and less positions for less and less money.
I want to work for a bio pharmacutical or biotech company. That has been my dream. I'm worried that getting that first job will be much harder then it would have been if I would have gotten into the school I should have gotten into. That said, I really really really don't want to do a post doc it seems like wasted time where I could be getting industry experience not to mention earning (I want to have a big ass family some day! That takes money to put kids through private school). Does any one know if industry always requires you to have a post doc? I was under the impression (most of my advise comes from academics. I have however, gotten my aunt looking into it right now for me) that from a good university your odds of getting into industry straight out were much better.

I also realize because of the economy not many people are being hired right now. I was looking at jobs I could do after I got my PhD and it wasn't good. My old boss who got his doctorate of polymers and coatings as I was getting my undergraduate degree, is also being forced to do a post-doc due to the bad economy.

On an end note, Sadly I honestly feel like I have taken a big backwards step in my career by going to this university. I have been obsessing about this like crazy.

To repeat all I care about is being able to provide for my future family. I will do what ever I have to do (short of illegal). And I just can't shake the feeling like I have F'd up. I was on such a role, graduating in just three years with top grades.


Another thought...
Is it true that there are just to many PhDs out there for Industry and Academia (I know there is to many for Academia)? With professions it seems they keep the numbers low through tough acceptance and tuition fees. The economics seems much better.


Anyways any one with any impute (any!) please help me out.
 

medicalCPA

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OP...Drop out of your PhD program. Now. And until your priorities shift from your future "bigass family" and the private school to which you want to send your kids, please do not do any PhD program (or PharmD program, for that matter) the disservice of enrolling.

I wish I could go on and tear apart your reasoning, but I am also a PhD student, and right now I should head off to lab. I will be back later in the day to respond to you properly.
 

Passion4Sci

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OP...Drop out of your PhD program. Now. And until your priorities shift from your future "bigass family" and the private school to which you want to send your kids, please do not do any PhD program (or PharmD program, for that matter) the disservice of enrolling.

I wish I could go on and tear apart your reasoning, but I am also a PhD student, and right now I should head off to lab. I will be back later in the day to respond to you properly.
Scalding!
 
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busyizzy

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Does any one know if industry always requires you to have a post doc? I was under the impression (most of my advise comes from academics. I have however, gotten my aunt looking into it right now for me) that from a good university your odds of getting into industry straight out were much better.
Honestly.... you sound really whiny. It almost sounds like you expect things to just magically unfold before you in the ways you want it to, and now that things are not going the way you want it to, you're just ... complaining and looking for a way to get out.

If you know what you want, then you should go for it. Sure, things might be easier for someone coming out of a better university, but the differences aren't going to be THAT significant. Those people from better universities might be presented with better opportunities - that just means you need to do what you can to get offered those same opportunities. It might mean working harder and extra hours how, but it will be worth it in the long run, if that is what you want. If you do good research, keep good connections, and publish well, then those same opportunities will present themselves to you. If they don't, then you have to pursue them. Contact a few companies, let them know you're interested in working, and maybe ask what you have to do to get in. For someone willing to do "almost anything," you're not doing very much to put yourself ahead.

For someone who wants a "bigass" family with a big paycheck, you should realize that a PharmD is going to set you back significantly, in terms of both time and money.
 
Oct 6, 2009
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OP...Drop out of your PhD program. Now. And until your priorities shift from your future "bigass family" and the private school to which you want to send your kids, please do not do any PhD program (or PharmD program, for that matter) the disservice of enrolling.

I wish I could go on and tear apart your reasoning, but I am also a PhD student, and right now I should head off to lab. I will be back later in the day to respond to you properly.
Lol thanks

Yah I do realize how obsessive I have been about this. :laugh:
 

pearljam5a1

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You seem really (as in OCD) obsessed with the future and are not focusing on the present. I really want to make a Yoda quote but I will save you that. Who cares if you aren't in your #1 pick for a school? Who cares if your classmates aren't as ambitious as you? You need to stop looking around at the people that surround you to define who you are and what you want to be.

If research is what you want to do than you need to do what everyone else in any other program has to do, regardless of a PhD or PharmD. You need to get out there and network. Opportunities do not just fall in your lap. You need to actively pursue them.

You already made the decision to pursue this PhD. Dropping out will look very bad for not only your future employment but also for your future education. Getting a PhD from a less known college is still better than not getting a PhD at all. It's not like you're losing money, only time. Your time is what you make it and if you keep thinking of it as a waste, then that is truly what it is.
 
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:eek:
You may be a troll (did you read the first post?) Anyways...


Honestly.... you sound really whiny. It almost sounds like you expect things to just magically unfold before you in the ways you want it to, and now that things are not going the way you want it to, you're just ... complaining and looking for a way to get out.
Magically huh...? I worked hard in school to get good grades. I think I earned it.

I simply feel that I've ****ed up and I should do something about it. Whether that means reapplying for a better University, Switching programs at my current university, or applying for Pharmacy school. I simply figure its better figure this stuff out now before I end up regretting it later on.


If you know what you want, then you should go for it. Sure, things might be easier for someone coming out of a better university, but the differences aren't going to be THAT significant. Those people from better universities might be presented with better opportunities - that just means you need to do what you can to get offered those same opportunities. It might mean working harder and extra hours how, but it will be worth it in the long run, if that is what you want. If you do good research, keep good connections, and publish well, then those same opportunities will present themselves to you. If they don't, then you have to pursue them. Contact a few companies, let them know you're interested in working, and maybe ask what you have to do to get in. For someone willing to do "almost anything," you're not doing very much to put yourself ahead.

While you probably arn't the best source. Thank you for your opinion, that is what I am looking for. How significant the name of the school is? Sure a pharmD is a pharmD. I have been under the impression that for PhD its important (of course almost all of my experience is with academic types). It could be the difference between job and no job. (typical job searches for PhD can be very long).



I have talked to some industry people. And I agree that getting that first job is very much about networking which I have been doing. Also I am trying to get a rotation through a company as well.

Don't twist words >> "almost anything".
I meant finding out as much information as I can (will I be a poor PhD? It's a little hard to support a family on postdoc salary). Does PhD school name matter? Program vs Department? Am I getting the best education as I can (I haven't been impressed).
Talking to people in industry( if there are simply to many people competing for jobs so that they only take those with post doc experience)
Then making a decision.

If its no big deal. Suck it up. And like you said (and I was planning on doing even if I had gotten into my schools of choice) networking, interning, etc.

If I really am screwing my self staying here. Well then I need to make a switch.

Reapply? (this time with responsible letter writer):luck:



If I go pharmacy school route. Volunteer nights at local pharmacies while still in school. To put my self in the best position for admittance.




For someone who wants a "bigass" family with a big paycheck, you should realize that a PharmD is going to set you back significantly, in terms of both time and money.

Lol. To clarify big ass family = like 4-5 kids.
Oh I know paying for pharmacy school will be a set back for a while, but it won't take long to pay off. I have very low Undergrad Debt as well.

5 years of PhD (+post doc) and having employers dismiss it because it's such a new program? That would really suck. I might be much happier in my second career choice then my first after all. Switching earlier rather then later is much better.

As some of the other posters have done.
wes011
chaunguyen

I hope you can empathize that I feel like I have ****ed up (well my advisor did). And now I am determining how to make the best of my current situation. Whether that is switching to pharmacy or not. It seems like an interesting carrier. I would be plenty happy with it. Part of doing that is finding out more about the programs, like which are accelerated (done) which was the main point of this post.
 
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Lol, I know I am obsessing with this pretty bad.

I don't even know why I care either, the world is ending in 2012. I figure I wont even graduate by then any ways.
:D
 

Passion4Sci

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Lol, I know I am obsessing with this pretty bad.

I don't even know why I care either, the world is ending in 2012. I figure I wont even graduate by then any ways.
:D
I hope it looks just like the movie 2012 also, because that $h!t looked awesome.
 

medicalCPA

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I finally have time to reply, but it seems like this thread is veering off-topic. That's OK by me, and seeing as it's Saturday evening, I'm too lazy to type up the long reply the OP's post will require.

G'night y'all, and remember, A PHD DOES NOT MEAN YOU WILL BE POOR FOR LIFE!
 

ffpickle

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Why not just get your MS in Biochem and apply simultaneously to PharmD & PhD programs at schools you want to attend.

Then....just go the PharmD route. It sounds like research is breaking you down. I've been there :(

My reasoning was that a PhD is always there for you if you really still want it. Look at all the international students who start PhD's at age 30, etc.

just go do your pharmd. it's mindless, sure, but who really cares about being intellectually stimulated? like you said, it's a decent job, and academia/research these days is just too cutthroat with not enough reward. There is a reason americans don't want to do phd's and international students do...
 
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Why not just get your MS in Biochem and apply simultaneously to PharmD & PhD programs at schools you want to attend.

Then....just go the PharmD route. It sounds like research is breaking you down. I've been there :(

My reasoning was that a PhD is always there for you if you really still want it. Look at all the international students who start PhD's at age 30, etc.

just go do your pharmd. it's mindless, sure, but who really cares about being intellectually stimulated? like you said, it's a decent job, and academia/research these days is just too cutthroat with not enough reward. There is a reason americans don't want to do phd's and international students do...

I think I will most likely at the very least complete my masters and publish a few. I figure it is a much cleaner break, shows that I am not a complete quitter. That thing about the international students is so true... It seems like indentured servitude.
Well time to go study for the PCAT and Classes / Do my experiments.
 

IrishRxMan

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I don't think it will show that you were a quitter. The program could have simply just not been what you were looking for or ended up not being what you expected. But, you do need to figure out what it is that you want to do before you set about going to do it.
 
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hi, there! i am just a new member here and wishes to seek some advices from you guys.
Well, i face a rather similar dilemma situations as the thread starter have faced it. I am currently studying bachelor of science (biochemistry) , but what i really want is pharmacy. may i know is that possible for me to switch or continue my master in pharmacy upon my graduation of biochemistry degree?

thnaks for any kind reply.:)
 
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your dilemma is not the same as the posters, as they are bewildered about their PhD degree, whereas you are wondering whether to finish your bachelors or apply now for a PHARM-D (not a master's program; there is no thesis written there, and it's 3-4 years long...).

If you're almost done with your bachelors, (e.g. 1-1.5 years left), then finish it. More degrees = more qualifications = better resume = possibly leg up on competition in the future.

If you absolutely hate your degree, then consider why you're doing science... PharmD academics in the first 2 years are very intensive.

good luck.
 
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your dilemma is not the same as the posters, as they are bewildered about their PhD degree, whereas you are wondering whether to finish your bachelors or apply now for a PHARM-D (not a master's program; there is no thesis written there, and it's 3-4 years long...).

If you're almost done with your bachelors, (e.g. 1-1.5 years left), then finish it. More degrees = more qualifications = better resume = possibly leg up on competition in the future.

If you absolutely hate your degree, then consider why you're doing science... PharmD academics in the first 2 years are very intensive.

good luck.
I know it is pretty hard for me to consider about changing my major now just because it involves two different faculties and the chances and competition for pharmacy places is really tough .

I am just wondering and curious as to know what most biochemistry graduates would end up with? must they continue till PHD and becomes a researcher?
Or is there any alternatives ways round like working at Food and beverages company as a biochemist or Quality controller? Or perhaps works at oil and gas factory or companies as a purifier of materials or somewhat we called as process engineer?

Please shed some light on it.TQ!
 
Nov 20, 2009
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i'm sad to say that a bachelors in any science field only leaves the option of being a technician in a company (whether it be pharmaceutics or biotechnology) and having to work from ground up.

a master's holds little added benefits as it normally allows you to be the "head" lab technician/assistant scientist over the bachelors.

in science, you always have to pursue the Doctorate (whether it be MD, PhD, PharmD, DDS, OD,etc...) if you want autonomy or money. Or you could get your MBA and go into administration.

if you really wanted the $$$ after only 4 years of school, you should have gotten an engineering degree (e.g. chem-E for the petroleum companies, etc.)

the trade off is that science is about building knowledge through your lifetime, unlike engineering where you hit 50 years old and they lay you off for 2 new college graduates. You will never see anyone lay off a 50 year old scientist at a biotechnology firm for 2 new college graduates (the knowledge just isn't the same).

ultimately that's the trade off you make for your love of science, it's a delay in gratification, a delay in wealth potential; we have to stay in school longer to get to that position we want, but just enjoy the ride!
 
Nov 19, 2009
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So has any one heard of greatly accelerated PharmD degrees for Masters of Science. I plan to call different universities for info as well.
Unfortunately pharmacy schools will treat you the same as any other student. As an applicant you might have the upper hand because you are more competitive, however your classes will not transfer over. Even students who have started one PharmD degree somewhere can't transfer there credit to another PharmD elsewhere (they must start over from the first year). Each pharmacy school is different so there might be one exception to the rule somewhere but you certainly wouldn't have any sort of selection to choose from.

Good news... there are several great 3 year programs to check out!
Good Luck!
 
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I don't think you're overanalyzing or OCD or anything Mikejep, this is the rest of your life you're thinking about, you're putting as much thought into it as it deserves I think! People that say job security or how much you make doesn't matter have probably never had to worry about money. Both of those do matter, a lot. But even still if you don't like pharmacy I wouldn't go into it, but find something else that you like with good job security and compensation.
 

medicalCPA

Actually, it's medicalCPA, PhD now
Moderator Emeritus
10+ Year Member
Mar 26, 2007
1,841
233
NYC, Baby!
Status
Medical Student
I don't think you're overanalyzing or OCD or anything Mikejep, this is the rest of your life you're thinking about, you're putting as much thought into it as it deserves I think! People that say job security or how much you make doesn't matter have probably never had to worry about money. Both of those do matter, a lot. But even still if you don't like pharmacy I wouldn't go into it, but find something else that you like with good job security and compensation.
That would have been useful to him four months ago...
 

boltdude

10+ Year Member
Apr 12, 2009
152
0
Status
the trade off is that science is about building knowledge through your lifetime, unlike engineering where you hit 50 years old and they lay you off for 2 new college graduates. You will never see anyone lay off a 50 year old scientist at a biotechnology firm for 2 new college graduates (the knowledge just isn't the same).
???

It's MUCH easier to be laid off as a PhD journeyman in industry than a seasoned engineer. You seriously think two new M.Eng. students will have the same knowledge and skill as a 50 year old engineer with the same degree? The elder one will be much more valuable, more so than the PhD working in industry relative to two new postdocs.

BTW, working in industry as a PhD scientist for a long time doesn't mean you gain new science/basic knowledge. Industry deals with applied research rather than basic research.
 
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elevenphoenix

fresh grad dying for tips on NAPLEX. HELP :(.
10+ Year Member
Nov 21, 2009
52
0
San Antonio, TX
Status
Pharmacist
This thread was hilarious. Thanks.

Couple of things:

1. Why are you planning for a "big ass" family?
2. Your statements lose credibility when you use profanity/poor grammar in a professional setting/forum.


Just my two cents, but why would you want to get a PharmD if you have no desire to become a pharmacist? I read your reasoning, but it doesn't make a lot of sense. Life doesn't always work out exactly as planned. Quit whining and seeking life-altering advice on an internet forum and do something about it.
 
Aug 4, 2009
75
0
Status
Pre-Pharmacy
The first page of the pre pharmacy section. I see I'm the first person to post to it since december, but for some reason it was on the first page, I never go to the second page. Could someone have posted and then deleted the post?
 

FarscapeGirl

10+ Year Member
5+ Year Member
Jul 31, 2007
783
1
Status
Pharmacy Student
???

It's MUCH easier to be laid off as a PhD journeyman in industry than a seasoned engineer. You seriously think two new M.Eng. students will have the same knowledge and skill as a 50 year old engineer with the same degree? The elder one will be much more valuable, more so than the PhD working in industry relative to two new postdocs.

BTW, working in industry as a PhD scientist for a long time doesn't mean you gain new science/basic knowledge. Industry deals with applied research rather than basic research.
??? Do you even know anything about a PhD in science? I'd say you may have to learn more in industry as a PhD scientist than academia, possibly. Industry follows the money, which means that today you may be working on anti-thrombolytic drugs and tomorrow you'll be working on cancer drugs. Which means a whole lot of reading in your new area, and possibly learning new techniques. There's always new research coming out, and there's new techniques all the time, too, which applies whether you're in industry or academia and whether it's something new or that you've been working on for a long time.
 

boltdude

10+ Year Member
Apr 12, 2009
152
0
Status
??? Do you even know anything about a PhD in science? I'd say you may have to learn more in industry as a PhD scientist than academia, possibly. Industry follows the money, which means that today you may be working on anti-thrombolytic drugs and tomorrow you'll be working on cancer drugs. Which means a whole lot of reading in your new area, and possibly learning new techniques. There's always new research coming out, and there's new techniques all the time, too, which applies whether you're in industry or academia and whether it's something new or that you've been working on for a long time.
Of course I do. I worked in biotech and did academia research. Have you? You just lost all credibility by saying "anti-thrombolytic" so I won't take your post seriously.
 

FarscapeGirl

10+ Year Member
5+ Year Member
Jul 31, 2007
783
1
Status
Pharmacy Student
Of course I do. I worked in biotech and did academia research. Have you? You just lost all credibility by saying "anti-thrombolytic" so I won't take your post seriously.
Well, considering I have a PhD in molecular biology, I've worked in an academic lab for five years and done an internship for two summers in biotech. So I would say I do have some experience.

And what would be the problem with anti-thrombolytic? It's a real word. And a treatment plan. Google it.
 

phathead

Future World Drug Lord
Moderator Emeritus
10+ Year Member
Sep 13, 2009
3,773
9
Status
Pharmacy Student
That site is so awesome-it might just be my new favorite.

I knew there was a reason I was on SDN instead of studying/while studying for my pharmacy management class...
Hey, as long as I can help :thumbup:
 
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