starlight1

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I know this has probably been discussed at some point but can someone fill me in on the lifestyle of a general neurologist?
 

neurologist

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starlight1 said:
I know this has probably been discussed at some point but can someone fill me in on the lifestyle of a general neurologist?

All day seeing headache, back pain and psych patients in clinic :barf:

All night seeing strokes in the ER :sleep:

How's that grab yer cojones? :laugh:
 

Pinky

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The thing i dreaded the most was the MS patients who usually had personality issues as well.

I thought that the non-urgency of many neuro issues leads to a more relaxed pace.

At some hospitals, the ER guys push the TPA for acute strokes. The patients are admitted to a medicine doc who then consults neurology first thing in the AM. Not a bad life.
 

bigfrank

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neurologist said:
All day seeing headache, back pain and psych patients in clinic :barf:

All night seeing strokes in the ER :sleep:

How's that grab yer cojones? :laugh:
One thing you forgot........the stroke F/Us in clinic......... :D
 

Pinky

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oh and i forgot to mention all the consults for altered mental status which could be summed up in four lines.

s - patient unable to talk
o - brainstem exam
a - metaboloic encephalopathy
p - correct underlying medical condition
 

penguins

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I did an elective rotation with a "community" neurologist and it was a great environment and a wonderful experience. He saw lots of headache patients, managed epileptics, read sleep studies, did EMGs, saw Park and Alz pts, some MS and Huntingtons.
I didn't think it was at all boring. The headaches got repetitive but there were some patients who lives he changed by playing with their meds and finding the right drug for them.
He started each day at his private practice at 8am and was home before 5pm every day. Fridays were mornings only and just EMGs. He followed his own patients in the hospital and was on call a couple of weekends a month.
He had a lot of time for his own family while still making money (via sleep studies and EMGs). He is also beloved by his community and has had the opportunity to really help people. Sure there was the occassional psych case but every type of physician gets stuck with a few of those.
:oops:
 

MarchMover

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Neurology is a rapidly changing field right now, and the "lifestyle" is changing as well.

It's true... the acute treatment of stroke has now changed us from specialists who can usually say "Thank you for your call. I'll be in tomorrow morning" to the ER docs, to more like the cardiologists having to run in and deal.

That is not always the case, of course. Some centers are equipped to handle these eventualities without the attending coming in... for example, most academic centers have their residents supervise the tPA cases, and attendings are by phone. Also, some centers are starting "hospital neurologist" programs, much like the internist hospitalists... which, if you are into acute care neurology, can be quite fun and also lucrative.

It's a field in flux... in 20 years, it will resemble internal medicine in its subspecialties... sure, in 2005 any neurologist can do anything, much like in 1955 any internist could do anything.... In the near future, there will be recognized subspecialties, some of which exist now, such as clinical neurophys, stroke, neuromuscular... soon neuroimmunology, epilepsy, movement disorders, etc. The lifestyle will vary greatly based on the subspecialty...

As a clinical subspecialty that is now geared toward treatment, not just the diagnose and adios chinscratching of the previous generation, most neurologists are quite busy, and have a lifestyle similar to that of treatment oriented internists. Oh, mostly, we are still well paid if that's what ya wanna know lol.
 

IMGforNeuro

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Neurology ,in retrospect is a subspeciality of internal med. It expanded so much that it became a separate field. As time goes on there will be even more differentiation in various neurology subspecialities.
 

bustbones26

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Right now, to be a good general neurologist, lifestyle is pretty good. Pay is not there, hence the reason why the specialty is not flooded as if say rads, derm, etc.

Now as far as inapatient versus outpatient, it depends on the neurologist's personality. I know some that love outpatient and grone when they get a consult on the hospital floor. And then I know some that really don't mind seeing consults in addition to outpatient. I personally feel that if neurohospitalist becomes a hot specialty, these specialist of course will nicely complement a practice where a few want to do outpatient only.

Now if stroke intervention becomes hot, i.e. neurologist being trained in doing interventional vascular procedures, there is not doubt that those particular neurologist will not have a nice lifestyle, will work longer hours, but of course, get paid more.