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Is there any kind of lifestyle for this field? Does every person in this field have multiple divorces?

I'm very interested about NIR, and the only thing stopping me from pursuing this path is because of my commitment to my family and my kids.

Please give me some of your observations and thoughts with regards to these NIR neurologists.
 

Thama

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Don't know about the divorces, but yes call schedule is brutal for NIR, and that's unlikely to improve much. It's inherent to a job where the primary reason for your existence (at least the primary reason for neurology presence in the field) is to be the person able to treat the most devastating of strokes ASAP no matter when they happen.
 
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FoodLovinMD

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You hide a $100 bill from a Neurointerventionalist the same way you hide it from a Neurosurgeon: Tape it to his/her kid's forehead.

But in all seriousness, NIR already has the worst lifestyle in clinical medicine (arguably), and it will only get worse. When you read these papers about MT for M3 and more distal occlusions, MT for NIHSS of 1-3, and MT for patients with high baseline mRS, you just see NIR digging its own grave.
 
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Jesus. It's a harsh reality for those NIR guys. Yes, I did read those papers about expanding MT for distal occlusions as well.

Honest question. How's the practice with a neurologist specialized in Epilepsy? My dream Neurology practice is to work up gen Neuro stuff, do a bunch of botox and nerve blocks, and read EEG on the side to finish my last 1-2 hours of the day. Is this feasible? Will it be more of an outpatient or inpatient gig?
 

Telamir

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What you're describing is mostly a generalist outpatient practice. People who specialize in epilepsy tend to want to focus on epilepsy, and depending on where you do your fellowship some want to focus on epilepsy surgery or medical management, etc. I am epilepsy boarded but work as a hospitalist so there are some of us who want to do things that way but I'd say it's not the norm.

Reading EEG on the side on the "last few hours of the day" is feasible as an outpatient doc mostly, as inpatient you have to deal with stat EEGs and hospital EEGs which generally cannot wait that long.

Also botox and nerve blocks...I don't have much experience with that but may god help you if you willingly want to specialize in pain.
 
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What you're describing is mostly a generalist outpatient practice. People who specialize in epilepsy tend to want to focus on epilepsy, and depending on where you do your fellowship some want to focus on epilepsy surgery or medical management, etc. I am epilepsy boarded but work as a hospitalist so there are some of us who want to do things that way but I'd say it's not the norm.

Reading EEG on the side on the "last few hours of the day" is feasible as an outpatient doc mostly, as inpatient you have to deal with stat EEGs and hospital EEGs which generally cannot wait that long.

Also botox and nerve blocks...I don't have much experience with that but may god help you if you willingly want to specialize in pain.
What's wrong with working up headache patients on the side and giving them these treatments in inpatient/outpatient setting? I actually enjoy chatting with these people. The encounters always seem to be smooth and easy. I have zero interest in the pain patient population.
 

Telamir

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Nothing wrong with it. If it's your jam and you like it go ahead. Not everyone likes that population, and I happen to be one of them.
 
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neurochica

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I have had difference experiences with NIR docs. I have a few personal friends in this field and in general there are on call 24/7-365. However, they generally dont come in until 10:30 am and have 2 hour lunches, when not busy of course. They come and go as they please......if there are no cases, and you live close, you can drop your kids and pic them up from school every day. they typically run the show......how many cases an average NIR does a year? 500?
 
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Thank you so much for all of the wise observations and feedbacks to my question.
 

neglect

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I have had difference experiences with NIR docs. I have a few personal friends in this field and in general there are on call 24/7-365. However, they generally dont come in until 10:30 am and have 2 hour lunches, when not busy of course. They come and go as they please......if there are no cases, and you live close, you can drop your kids and pic them up from school every day. they typically run the show......how many cases an average NIR does a year? 500?
Only the dumbest of dumb admins would allow this. Obviously that's possible, because many administrators are horrible. But typically NIR guys have to work. They have to see each adn every false alarm, admit every bleed, follow all their post-op cases, etc. Rarified positions where they JUST do cases and go home are possible, I've heard about them, but seem rare. Again, you've got to find that magic combination of a stupid hospital admin who would allow this. Personally, if I were the medicine team being dumped on and doing all the bleed admissions and post-op follow ups, I'd leave.
 
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