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KatieJune

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Hello. I'm sorry if this sounds uneducated, but what do you guys think there are any limitations of osteopathic medicine compared to allopathic? (especially in terms of employment?) Osteopathic schools sound great, but I don't know any DOs so I just was curious. Thanks!
 

none

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The main limitations come when one attempts to practice medicine outside of the United States. Other than that, it's more an issue of difficulty in pursuing certain ultra-competitive specialities than actual limitations. The same problems occur with many allopathic schools.
 

Toejam

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Hey KatieJune

Don't worry about asking questions. This is how the public becomes educated. I'm neither a DO nor a DO student, but I aspire to be. I'll tell you what I know.

First off, Osteopathic Physicians have the title DO (Doctor of Osteopathic Medicine), not OD. OD is reserved for optometrists.

The other poster is correct in saying that the only limitation for DO's vs. MD's is the ability to practice anywhere overseas. DO's can practice full scope medicine in a lot of countries, limited scope (usually meaning physical manipulation and no surgery, no prescriptions) in others and cannot practice at all in a small minority.

Other than that, DO's can enter any specialty of medicine that MD's do (Neurosurgery, Orthopedics, OB/GYN, Emergency Medicine, etc.). They do the same residencies with MD residents and also with other DO's in DO affiliated residencies and have all of the same rights and responsibilities.

DO's also learn something called OMM (Osteopathic Manipulative Medicine...it has other names as well). I'm no expert, but I believe it utilizes physical manipulation of the musculoskeletal system to improve certain conditions. DO's and DO students would have a better grasp on this (I'm a podiatrist). There are also more DO's who practice primary care medicine compared with MD's.

There are books that you can read that will give you a good perspective on DO's and their history. Look under "osteopathic" on Amazon.com
 

Dr JPH

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Originally posted by none
The main limitations come when one attempts to practice medicine outside of the United States. Other than that, it's more an issue of difficulty in pursuing certain ultra-competitive specialities than actual limitations. The same problems occur with many allopathic schools.

Here you will find a listing of countries other than the United States and their policy towards DOs practicing.

http://www.studentdo.com/first.htm

Click on PROGRAMS then INTERNATIONAL HEALTH
 
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