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List of Useful Psychotherapy Books

Discussion in 'Psychology [Psy.D. / Ph.D.]' started by Logic Prevails, Nov 25, 2005.

  1. Logic Prevails

    5+ Year Member

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    Any clinical grad students or clinical psychologists care to share what books/hankbooks etc. they think are useful and worth reading?

    I'll start:

    Cognitive Therapy: Basics and Beyond (J. Beck)
    Assessment of Children: Cognitive Applications (Sattler)
     
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  3. LM02

    LM02 Senior Member
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    It's not a psychotherapy book, per se, but I always recommend Don't Shoot the Dog by Karen Pryor, for a good introduction/refresher on basic behavioral principles.

    I would also recommend:

    Weissman et al's Comprehensive Guide to Interpersonal Psychotherapy
    Miller & Rollnick's Motivational Interviewing, 2nd Ed.
     
  4. JatPenn

    JatPenn Senior Member
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    sattler isnt psychotherapy either :confused:

    still a good assessment tool, though.

    and the CT book, that's AARON Beck, right?
     
  5. psychanon

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    No, it's by Judy Beck (Aaron Beck's daughter)
     
  6. JatPenn

    JatPenn Senior Member
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    Thanks :thumbup:
     
  7. Logic Prevails

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    You're right, Sattler isn't a psychotherapy text. I thought I typed in "assessment" but didn't - I knew it was only a matter of time that someone would point it out (while not bothering to add anything to the list)

    The actual psychologists on this board are so damn busy talking about their careers, how much money their making, the possibility of masters level psychologists etc. that none of them will even bother to suggest any books that they find (found) useful in their own graduate training or clinical practice.

    I thought this woud be a very useful thread (worthy of a 'sticky'). I guess not.
     
  8. JatPenn

    JatPenn Senior Member
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    Uh, well, here's my take:

    I don't really find books like these to be helpful. Obviously not with my research where I would only be concerned with peer-reviewed publications, and not even in my clinical practice training. I am a fan of manualized, empirically supported treatments, and these are the only publications that I would find especially useful at this stage. Keep in mind that books like these offer only one person's opinion, and should not be accepted as part of the literature or a body of general knowledge.

    Hopefully that explains why I didn't offer any of my own suggestions. I think a good number of people on this board might feel similar, explaining the lack of "stickying" this post. But maybe not, just IMO.
     

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