Literature Search

Discussion in 'Pathology' started by A.D.O.R., Nov 23, 2005.

  1. A.D.O.R.

    A.D.O.R. Acronym Lover
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    I have a simple main question and multiple follow-up questions: How do you guys do your literature searches?

    Multiple follow-up questions: Do you simply go to pubmed and type in various phrases until something of interest pops up? Do you have a more efficient and direct approach? Has anyone ever done the pubmed tutorial (I'm actually thinking about doing this)?

    I ask all this because I usually have trouble finding the most recent and relevant articles for my autopsy reports. Since I have five of them to do in the near future, I would like to make this part as painless as possible. Thanks.
     
  2. AngryTesticle

    AngryTesticle Happy Gonad
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    It helps to know the leading authorities in a given field. That way you can search by author name (i.e., Testicle AT). If you want to search for papers with multiple authors, you can input something like (Testicle AT AND Douchebag DW).

    If you don't know author names that's fine. What I'll do is type in a key word (i.e., fart). However, that will lead to many literature hits. So I like to combine with other key words (i.e., fart AND death AND retrograde AND ejaculation). Something like that. If you want to limit your search to a particular year, you can input something like "fart AND death AND retrograde AND ejaculation AND 2005." Then if you want to limit your search to just review articles, the search becomes "fart AND death AND retrograde AND ejaculation AND review AND 2005."

    Just play around with it and see what works and what doesn't work. That's usually what I do.
     
  3. stormjen

    stormjen Path PGY
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    Ever since I took a one-hour class on using Pubmed, I almost always use MeSH searches. It's a good way to zero in on what you're looking for while minimizing all the extraneous crap. Here's a simple example:

    Say I want to find the complications associated with liver transplantation...

    -Use the drop-down box on the upper left to set it to search "MeSH"
    -Enter "liver transplantation" in the search box, and hit GO
    -Check the box for liver transplantation
    -In the drop-down box that says "send to" pick "send to search box with AND"
    -enter "complications" in the search box and hit GO
    -Check the box for complications and send to the search box
    -Click "search pubmed"

    With the MeSH search, I get 399 papers.

    With the general search for "liver transplantation complications" I get 1322 papers.

    You can also limit your findings to specific age groups, authors, year of publication, etc. in the limits area.
     
  4. stormjen

    stormjen Path PGY
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    Oh yeah, one other thing. I think the point of using "MeSH" is so you know what specific terminology to use. With the example I gave, it was pretty obvious what to search for, but sometimes you may not know what the "official" term is that you're supposed to be searching for, so it will tell you exactly what terms to use in your search.
     
  5. DiePath

    DiePath Junior Member

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    How do you search the differential diagnoses for let's say "myxoid lesions of the lung". I've had problems with finding the diagnosis for things like clear cells lesion, etc. Is there a good software or website out there that would help?
     
  6. deschutes

    deschutes Thing
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    I think Pathology Outlines might be more helpful for that:

    http://www.pathologyoutlines.com/

    The people on surg path will probably have their own things to add!
     
  7. yaah

    yaah Boring
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    Sometimes opening up a textbook is the best option, actually.
     
  8. deschutes

    deschutes Thing
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    Signing out with author of said textbook usually works well too ;)
     
  9. AngryTesticle

    AngryTesticle Happy Gonad
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    Well, that depends on IF the author of said textbook takes the time to teach you during signout. We've discussed this.
     
  10. deschutes

    deschutes Thing
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    Yeah well, you're the one bringing it up now :p
     
  11. AngryTesticle

    AngryTesticle Happy Gonad
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  12. PathOne

    PathOne Derminatrix
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    For diagnostic work, I still prefer the textbooks. I'd pack Ackerman for surg path, Weedon's and McKee/Calonje for dermpath and Fletcher for soft tissue.
    In research, and to follow current developments, pubmed is obviously indispensable. I also find that Mesh-searches works best to narrow down the hits.
     
  13. AngryTesticle

    AngryTesticle Happy Gonad
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    Weiss is good for soft tissue as well. BTW, don't buy the current Fletcher tumor texts at this point in time. He is coming out with a new edition in the coming year.

    I'm on derm now and I too like the McKee book as well (based on the little that I have read so far ;) ). I think Lever has some good chapters as well...good stuff for dermie noobs like myself.
     
  14. PathOne

    PathOne Derminatrix
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    Yea, Lever's a keeper too. And excellent for brushing up before the dreaded dermpath boards. McKee's strength is esp. the clinical correlations - very handy for the non-Derm dermpaths.

    Also agree with you on Fletcher. It's getting to be a bit dated, esp. on the molec side.
     

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