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Looking for any kind of direction... anything.. really!

Discussion in 'Pre-Medical - DO' started by healingcasanova, May 16, 2007.

  1. healingcasanova

    healingcasanova Healing Casanova

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    I have wanted to be a doctor all of my life.

    After I entered college, I obtained a better understand of how our medical system works and decided what I really wanted was to be a healer. I graduated 2 years ago with the intention of attending a holistic school, like a naturopathic school for example. I have been practicing bodywork for 3years ( http://HealingCasanova.com ).

    I have now begun the process of applying to med school as I have made some different choices. I believe that having a medical degree will provide me with move opportunity and influence in the long run to accomplish my goal of bringing healing, not merely a potential temporary fix, to those who desperately need it in our society.

    However in searching for a mentor or the right school I have been met with great challenge. I understand medical curriculum is standardized I but I know there is a population of older physicians who have turned toward a more holistic practice. is there not a way the choose this from the beginning or must you go through med school then get further holistic type schooling?

    Im looking for a practitioner mentor or schools with amore preventative practice reputation. I know DO schools tend to be more preventative, but is there one in particular?

    Im interested in nutrition, bodywork, herbs, energetic medicine/ therapy and other holistic therapies in conjunction with western medicine.

    Thank you for any guidance on my path.:love:
     
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  3. Fermata

    Fermata Hold me.
    Physician

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    I understand your want to become a healer but my question to you is do you want to become a physician?
     
  4. Dr.Inviz

    Dr.Inviz Banned
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    I recommend you shadow a real doctor, MD AND/or DO, doesn't matter -- but I would shadow both. There is a difference between "healers" and physicians.
     
  5. healingcasanova

    healingcasanova Healing Casanova

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    Physician to me means an MD or DO, a doctor, who has undergone extensive training and licensing procedures.

    I want this aspect of being a physician, yes. I believe undergoing this training and education, will provide me with more open doors to do what I want. Physicians undergo such training for a reason. Most believe that someone who successfully undergoes this rigorous training is qualified.

    Now, to me it is unfortunate that the training is standardized, and does not include very much instruction ( if any at all) on very pertinent and useful topics, such as nutrition or physical medicine ( which do not cause nasty side effects, but actually call unto a persons ability to heal naturally).

    It is true that the vast majority of physcians practice a certain way in this country, but I dont believe i have to adhere to that philosophy in order to become a doctor.

    Just because schools are now very limited and close minded in curriculum, doesnt mean chosing to be a physician ultimately limits my practice.

    My hope is to find a practicing doctor or someone who can say: yes this school has some holistic instructors who practice that way on their own. Or this location of the school has many opportunities for doctors to practice preventively.

    Thanks for you feed back.
     
  6. youngtraumadoc

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    I don't know if I understand your question exactly, but it does seem that you desire some clarification. Essentially, you have had practice with "bodyworks" as a profession but now want to advance and be able to do more for your patients.

    As stated earlier, you must first decide how much more do you want to do for your patients (treat them, prescribe meds, refer them....) and are your willing to put in the time and money to obtain that training? If your answer is yes then continue below....

    There are two main branches of medicine here: allopathic (which is your traditional MD that takes care of patients and prescribes meds...) and osteopathic (which is a DO who does everything an MD can do, but recieves additional training, in med school, on how to use a holistic approach and look at the patient as more than just a set of problems that need to be fixed).
    From my understanding of your post, you want to be a DO.

    Applicants to DO schools do range on the slightly higher age range with people even in their 35+ applying and getting in. Their requirements may also seem a bit less picky, but are still competitive. You can go the AACOMAS website (google it) which is where you apply to the schools, and they also have a lot of cool stuff on their website on what osteopathy is. You can also contact the AOA and they will help put you in touch with a DO who can give you some more insight.

    Hope this helps
     
  7. hanky1982

    hanky1982 Irish eyes are smiling

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    I think you need to consider what you can do with your degree from a medical school. You will gain an understanding of the body numerous parts, but this will not automatically prepare you to be well versed in herbal remidies. I kinda see it as you need to decide if you want to be a physician (i.e. treat people with the best knowledge and research out there today) or you want to focus on more 'untraditional' remedies. You will probably not become well versed in these types of treatment from medical school. With that said, it does not mean you can't use 'untraditional' techniques in your practice. I feel you need to shadow a few doctors and see if their profession is for you. If you feel you can incorporate herbal remedies and homeopathic techniques into your practice then by all means become a physician. But if you feel that being a physician limits your scope of using these techniques then I would advise not to apply and look for alternate paths in "healing" others.
     
  8. youngtraumadoc

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    Well not exactly. Being a physican, of any kind, means you are well rounded. Even a neurosurgeon can treat the common cold or at least know how to fix a broken bone (hence the reason for clinical rotations in med school). In ALL osteopathic schools, students are taught OMM, which can be used as an alternative to prescribing meds and surgery. NOW, the extent that such a physican uses the techniques depend on personal choice, field of practice time. If you are an ER doc, you would probably not have much time to do OMM on every patient but could certainly uses the skills and knowledge to help your patient. In family practice, many DOs perform OMM and some even make seperate appts. for it. So...the field of osteopathy in general takes on a more holistic approach than allopathic medicine. Each school is essentially the same in this regard.
     
  9. Dr.Inviz

    Dr.Inviz Banned
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    I didn't realize there was a difference between a doctor and a physician -- anyways, a physician is a doctor. Please, don't get me into the "but a PhD is also a doctor, so is a dentist, blah blah .. There was nothing in my statement that was meant to "confuse" you.

    Great, more power to you if you want this. However, the question is, do you REALLY want this? How do you know? Have you shadowed a physician and/or volunteered? Nobody questions the quality of training physicians go through -- not sure where you got that from.

    Are you sure about this? It's not always about pulling out the script. In addition, it's quackery to believe that your own body can heal everything and anything on its own. Especially worse, when people don't take care of themselves in the first place .. ahem .. obesity anyone?

    What certain way do majority of physicians practice?

    What the hell are you talking about?

    Future quackwatch.org candidate? I don't know; however, stick to naturopathy -- where everything is so "open-minded"
     
  10. Fermata

    Fermata Hold me.
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    Honestly, it sounds like you are more cut out for a naturopathic program.

    That being said, what you are asking about does exist.

    http://integrativemedicine.arizona.edu/clinic/index.html

    Physical medicine is more under the jurisdiction of physical medicine and rehabilitation trained physicians or OMM-type people.

    Nutrition is something very nebulous and is often the domain of dietitians who have their own professional requirements(R.D.).

    You can definitely accomplish what you want to but I think that it is going to be difficult to be admitted to a medical school with your current personal statement.
     
  11. Krazykritter

    Krazykritter Senior Member

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    :thumbdown:
    OMG, I can't believe that I'm about to say this...I agree w/ Inviz on this one. Medical school, whether MD or DO, is structured the way it is for a reason. Good luck w/ medical liability & maintaining insurance coverage if you prescribe mentholated fumes for pneumonia instead of Abx.

    In all honesty, if you want to learn more about health & nutrition as a physician, there are plenty of post-graduate opportunities that can allow you to become educated & certified to counsel patients based on lifestyle recommendations in regards to nutrition. However, there is a reason why more of our treatments are not based on lifestyle recommendations; patients do not comply w/ them. Exercise & a proper diet are excellent ways to reduce BP & fight off diabetes, but there is no way that I could ever let a patient go w/ a BP of 180/110 only w/ a recommendation to exercise.:thumbdown:
     
  12. Krazykritter

    Krazykritter Senior Member

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    Double post, sorry.
     
  13. spicedmanna

    Moderator Emeritus

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    First of all, please don't cross-post threads, as it tends to clutter the forums. Pick one and your thread will get answered.

    Second, I agree with much of the advice above. You need to get clear about what it is you actually want. This needs to be an informed choice, so I recommend getting to know what physicians actually do on a day-to-day basis. This can be learned by shadowing actual physicians and getting some pt care experience. You need to understand that the Western approach to medicine and the Western healthcare system (insurance, etc.) is rather intolerant of CAM. If you decide to attend medical school, you are building your foundation around evidence-based medicine. It is beneficial to know that this is the foundation that you want for your practice. I wouldn't recommend attending 4-years of medical school, undergoing 4-years of residency, an addition 2-3 years of fellowship in some cases, and going $250K in debt, just to find out that you don't give a darn about performing DDx and giving Rx and/or making an appropriate medical intervention when it is indicated. Using the evidence-based medical model is essential to the practice of a physician; you wouldn't really be a Western physician if you don't use it, and you would have thus wasted your time and money.

    If you are more interested in CAM, it would behoove you to pursue professional degrees and/or schools that do that. MD/DO schools are schools of Western medicine and they train physicians to practice the Western medical model, which is evidence-based.

    Good luck in your endeavors.
     
  14. prionsRbad

    prionsRbad Mooooo

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    You will have to go through med school first (MD or DO). Some schools offer electives in eastern medicine etc., but it is not taught as part of the main curriculum at any allo or osteo schools.

    I do know of a doctor (MD) that practiced as an anesthesiologist for 10 years and then took of to China and became certified in acupuncture and alternative medicine. She now practices in San Francisco as an acupuncturist.

    Maybe you would be interested in ND . . . have you heard about it?
    http://www.naturopathic.org/
    There are MD/ND doctors out there, but mostly in the Midwest and California :)


    Good luck :luck:
     
  15. prionsRbad

    prionsRbad Mooooo

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    OP, sorry . . . I skimmed your first post and didn't catch that you were already interested in ND . . .oops! I think you should go for MD/ND, seems like the best fit for what you say you're interested in :D
     

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