Kikaku21

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I've been playing for many years. I know it could be a great letter. It verifies that I am diverse and have alot of interests, etc, etc....

Should I bother and would any medicals schools care?
 

VandyXGirl

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No, you want your LOR letters to come from people who can speak of your academic prowess and your ability to be a good physician. While your piano teacher may know you really well, he/she would make a great personal reference for job applications, but not for medical school applications. Stick to professors or academic advisors from organizations at your college in which you are actively involved.
 

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I've been playing for many years. I know it could be a great letter. It verifies that I am diverse and have alot of interests, etc, etc....

Should I bother and would any medicals schools care?

Agree with Vandy - when LOR hunting you should stick to MD/PhD/DO or anyone supervising your courses/clinical/volunteer/research experience. A letter from a random piano teacher won't open anyone's eyes.
 
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rlwebb

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Piano lessons are often 1 on 1, and if you haved used some of the time to discuss outside interests, and if your teacher can attest to your personality and characteristics as they relate to medicine, then I think it's good. Would maybe be better if the piano teacher had some credentials. I have a LOR from associate professor of music at my school, who is my teacher.
 

BellyDancingDoc

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Piano lessons are often 1 on 1, and if you haved used some of the time to discuss outside interests, and if your teacher can attest to your personality and characteristics as they relate to medicine, then I think it's good. Would maybe be better if the piano teacher had some credentials. I have a LOR from associate professor of music at my school, who is my teacher.

:thumbdown:

No offense rlwebb, but this is really bad advice. Adcomms are going to be looking for letters that describe the applicant's prospects as: (1) an academic, (2) a clinician, and possibly (3) a researcher. LORs from a more diverse group of people might have worked great for undergrad, but med school is a totally different game.

Your LOR from the Assoc. Prof. at your school works fine because he/she as a professor. But a letter from a random piano teacher, no matter how strong the relationship might be, is not going to work. The only exception to this is if both the OP and the letter writer are world-renowned, accomplished pianists.
 

BellyDancingDoc

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They would take one look at the letter and think to themselves, "Wow, this loser couldn't even get their college professors to write them a letter. Toss this app in the trash."

Yes. I wasn't gonna be this harsh, but this is 100% true.
 

mave

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There's nothing wrong with having one character reference in 6 letters. If you have six letters, and three of them come from classroom professors, one comes from a professor you did research with, and one from a physician you shadowed, then you should have something that attests to interests outside of medicine and/or from a person who knows you really well in a non-academic sense. You're treating people. It's nice to know whether or not you can relate to them in any sense.

Go for it!
 

LMarie_MD2b

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If you're going into medicine for the proper reasons, and plan to be successful, you have, somewhere inside of you, a passionate and perseverent core. If you are going to be a truly great clinician, I think this is an essential characteristic. Music is a discipline that allows a person to express this passion constructively and in many different forms (style, tone, tempo, etc.)--and learning to play the piano with much skill past "Chopsticks" definitely requires perseverence.

The person who has helped you develop that passion and has witnessed your perseverence would be a fantastic choice for an LOR. Granted, he/she might not have a PhD/MD/DO, but the fact that you two share a strong long standing relationship matters a lot. Your teacher may need some *gentle* guidance (what to emphasize, from what viewpoint, framing and the like) for what to include and how to structure the letter, but it sounds as though this is a solid choice for you.

Professors, unless you go to a relatively small school, only get to know you for 16 weeks. They see you in class and office hours, you might have a few in-depth conversations, and they read your personal statement before they write your letter. This is appropriate because they have an objective record of your academic performance, and likely have years of experience dealing with requests, so they know how to write an LOR. Obviously, it is necessary to foster personal relationships with professors to ensure glowing letters of this type, but these are not the only letters AdComs are looking for.

As someone with the opportunity to shine the spotlight on your abilities as an ENTIRE PERSON, rather than some pre-med gunner robot, you are incredibly fortunate. You have dextrous skills, are able to express yourself in constructive ways, likely have good communication skills, and have talent that many other applicants may not possess. These things set you apart, and your piano instructor is the person who can attest to all of these. Not your physics 2 professor.
 

Lests55

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I don't think that has any place in an admissions file. What would the letterhead be? What is this person going to sign in at as? Associate Professor of Music at 3998 Oak Drive? Put it as an activity...but do yourself a favor and not as a letter.
 

LMarie_MD2b

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What would the letterhead be? What is this person going to sign in at as? Associate Professor of Music at 3998 Oak Drive?

If all adcoms look at is the letterhead, why the hell did my application process take so long?! Maybe I'll suggest to my younger pre-med friends that they have their recommendors just send a copy of their CVs, to make sure that I'm a qualified applicant with great character and social skills. There *certainly* isn't any way of knowing that I'm going to be a good doctor.

I personally used two such character references in my application this year. One was my high school softball coach, who is still a close friend, and another was a county official from my hometown, with whom I have participated in political events on all levels. These letters showed my interest in things outside of science and medicine, and I was asked about them in every interview I've attended. I believe these letters were absolutely beneficial to my candidacy, along with four others from professors who know me well.

Bottom line, OP: do what you think will help you more. It's better to have a fabulous letter from someone who is sincerely testifying to your merit than a lukewarm letter from a PhD who can say you came to class and were in the top 10% during your semester with them.
 

BellyDancingDoc

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Great idea. How about everyone get one from their mom? Who else with a "strong long standing relationship" could testify to your "perseverence" and development?

"When I first met LMarie_MD2b, she was unable to speak or walk, and required assistance with such basic activities as cleaning her own a$$ and eating. Over the years, I have watched her hard work pay off as she entered school and learned to tell the difference between a circle and a triangle . . . "

Note:
I switched the quoted portion font, color, and size back to normal because it was incredibly annoying.

Thank you, Tired. In the immortal words of Dr. Cox:

I don't know if they taught you this in the land of fairies and puppy-dog tails, where you obviously, if not grew up then at least spent most of your summers, but you're in the real world now. Nnnnn-kay?
 
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i think if this is your extra letter (not one of your big 3 from professors, research investigators, and/or community service letters), this would be a good one.
 

VandyXGirl

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There's nothing wrong with having one character reference in 6 letters. If you have six letters, and three of them come from classroom professors, one comes from a professor you did research with, and one from a physician you shadowed, then you should have something that attests to interests outside of medicine and/or from a person who knows you really well in a non-academic sense. You're treating people. It's nice to know whether or not you can relate to them in any sense.

Go for it!

I think 6 letters is going way over board (that's maybe just my opinion though). Adcomms ask for 3 for a reason, because they have a lot of apps to get through. Be considerate and give them what they ask for in the application: two science and one non-science. If you really feel that an additional letter (or maybe 2) would be beneficial, then add it. I worked in a lab full-time for almost a year, so I had my PI, who also knew me from when I was younger, write me a LOR. I personally just do not think that a letter from a piano teacher is appropriate. Your 3 professor references should be able to talk about your character as well. You shouldn't need a separate LOR just to talk about your personal character traits. If you get LOR from professors that really know you, they can attest to how great a person and a student you truly are.
 
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mave

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I don't think that has any place in an admissions file. What would the letterhead be? What is this person going to sign in at as? Associate Professor of Music at 3998 Oak Drive? Put it as an activity...but do yourself a favor and not as a letter.

Most of the people that you interact with as a physician aren't doctors. It's silly, and frankly, juvenile to suggest that a person can't help you get into medical school simply because they don't have an MD/PhD/DO degree. If a person can attest to your hard work, manual dexterity (a somewhat valuable skill to say the least if you plan on entering ANY kind of surgical field), discipline, and people skills, then you would be a fool NOT to ask them. You get six shots to have someone else sell you.

I think that you pick six people who can write you the strongest recommendations. I think that, yes, most of them should be academic. But, I don't think it's a bad idea to ask someone who knows you as a person, outside the stresses of classroom to write a letter for you.

Talk about the emphasis on all the wrong things. Music teachers are one of the most vital, yet underused and underfunded resources in American schools. Music in education could be the single greatest thing that saves schools. Music in education leads to higher scores in math and science, a greater creative capacity, and lower rates of behavioral- and attention-related disorders. It gives children a goal to reach toward, and it gives them something to be proud of.

I'm willing to bet that there are very few people on this board who can name something that they started doing in elementary school that they're *still* doing. I'm also willing to bet that, if the OP's piano teacher *was* a music professor, then people would feel a lot differently. But, because there are only so many piano professor spots, and a lot of really good piano teachers, they can't all have letterheads.

Adcomms ask for 3 for a reason, because they have a lot of apps to get through.

Adcomms don't ask for 3 letters. Pre-medical committees who write your composite ask for 4 to 6 letters. At least, they did at Big State University with 2,000 pre-meds. And if they're willing to read 'em, I'm willing to get 'em.

Don't listen to the gunners, OP. You're doing the right thing.
 

Lests55

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You need writers from an objective authority. This is not a private lesson music teacher who could be your aunt.
 

Lests55

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Most of the people that you interact with as a physician aren't doctors. It's silly, and frankly, juvenile to suggest that a person can't help you get into medical school simply because they don't have an MD/PhD/DO degree. If a person can attest to your hard work, manual dexterity (a somewhat valuable skill to say the least if you plan on entering ANY kind of surgical field), discipline, and people skills, then you would be a fool NOT to ask them. You get six shots to have someone else sell you.

I think that you pick six people who can write you the strongest recommendations. I think that, yes, most of them should be academic. But, I don't think it's a bad idea to ask someone who knows you as a person, outside the stresses of classroom to write a letter for you.

Talk about the emphasis on all the wrong things. Music teachers are one of the most vital, yet underused and underfunded resources in American schools. Music in education could be the single greatest thing that saves schools. Music in education leads to higher scores in math and science, a greater creative capacity, and lower rates of behavioral- and attention-related disorders. It gives children a goal to reach toward, and it gives them something to be proud of.

I'm willing to bet that there are very few people on this board who can name something that they started doing in elementary school that they're *still* doing. I'm also willing to bet that, if the OP's piano teacher *was* a music professor, then people would feel a lot differently. But, because there are only so many piano professor spots, and a lot of really good piano teachers, they can't all have letterheads.



Adcomms don't ask for 3 letters. Pre-medical committees who write your composite ask for 4 to 6 letters. At least, they did at Big State University with 2,000 pre-meds. And if they're willing to read 'em, I'm willing to get 'em.

Don't listen to the gunners, OP. You're doing the right thing.

:laugh:
Anyway...do I think someone who isn't in academics/medicine can help you get into medical school? Absolutely. This is not the same question is should I have a *private* music teacher who I have known for years write a letter for an admissions committee. I think that is, well, silly.
 

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I agree with everyone else here, with one possible exception. If you have some serious piano creds, as in have competed successfully in competitions etc. and have some evidence that you play at a much higher level than other med students who play piano (which is ALL OF THEM!!!). Do yourself a favor and get letters from hospital volunteer coordinators, research advisors and professors. Only go for these extracurric stretches if you're truly outstanding.
 

mave

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Lests, anyone who knows you is not objective. If they're writing a letter about what a wonderful candidate you're going to be, you clearly have a relationship with them, and they aren't writing a letter from an objective point of view. It doesn't matter if it's a piano teacher, or an OChem professor, or your lab PI. Letters of recommendation are not objective; they're subjective.
 

Lests55

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Lests, anyone who knows you is not objective. If they're writing a letter about what a wonderful candidate you're going to be, you clearly have a relationship with them, and they aren't writing a letter from an objective point of view. It doesn't matter if it's a piano teacher, or an OChem professor, or your lab PI. Letters of recommendation are not objective; they're subjective.

I mean people who see other premeds frequently. That way you have objective standards to compare potential physicians with (hardworking, intelligent, etc.). Someone you paid money for their services would be about the less objective person I could imagine.
 

Lests55

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You may find one person out of ten who would take this half-way seriously (see this thread). Are you willing to take those chances that it will be any better for an admissions committee composed of a bunch of 50 year-old science faculty members?
 

mave

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Have you taken a music course at your school?

Eight semesters of college ensemble courses. In addition to that, fourteen years on a primary instrument, six years on a secondary instrument, twelve on piano, and four on acoustic guitar.:cool:
 

Lests55

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Eight semesters of college ensemble courses. In addition to that, fourteen years on a primary instrument, six years on a secondary instrument, twelve on piano, and four on acoustic guitar.:cool:

I was actually asking the OP. If they have taken a music course it would look a lot better coming from that professor. Kudos for your prowess, though.
 
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sekem

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I've been playing for many years. I know it could be a great letter. It verifies that I am diverse and have alot of interests, etc, etc....

Should I bother and would any medicals schools care?

not all school though, but some schools will require one letter for your ec/job/research ... so you might be able to use it.

BUT you should not put hope for most of schools on this letter!
 

mave

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This is the only place to find truly objective LoRs...

objective.JPG
 

weathertalk

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If you think that your Piano teacher can add something unique through a LOR, you should request one. However, this should be treated as an EXTRA letter. Make sure you have solid academic letters from senior professors.

I think people are being far too dismissive of the strength of a piano teacher's word. I'm sure a lot of college athletes may get a character rec from their coaches. If you're truly an exceptional pianist (i.e., you compete and/or perform regularly) and request a rec from your teacher, it's pretty much the same situation. Also, since everyone and their mother plays the piano, your teacher's letter could attest to your actual ability level (again, only if you're very accomplished).
 

Kikaku21

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There's a reason that, traditionally, people don't use piano teachers for their LoRs. Everyone has people in their life who will atest to how wonderful they are, how hard they work, etc. These people (piano teachers, parents, family friends, your Pediatrician) may write great letters, but they are inherrently biased, and not really comparing you to anyone else.

College professors, on the other hand, are comparing you to all the other smart, motivated students who come through their class. Faculty you did research with are comparing you to all the other students who did research with them. MDs you've shadowed are comparing you to all the other students they have seen come through. This is what the adcoms are really interested in: how you compare to every other smart, special, hard-working student whose app crosses their desk.

If you want to use personal references, more power to you. But don't be suprised if you are taken less seriously than the "gunner" who actually took time to impress a college faculty member and get an LoR from them. Anyone can get a fluffy letter from someone who's known them since they were a kid, but serious applicants get letters from folks whose position & title matters.

1st off. I'm getting kind of tired of the assumptions. Some people here are outright prejudiced. It would indeed be my 6th letter. I already have the mandatory 2 science letters, 1 non-science letter, letter from my boss (a PhD economist who I've been working with for 3 years), and a letter from the clinic manager that I have been volunteering for. So those of you who have ASSUMED that I am thinking of doing this because I am incapable of finding anyone else to say something decent about me can SHOVE IT.

Now for those of you who have made references about my piano teacher's credentials. My teacher has a PhD in piano performance from Yale, and she is regularly involved in an assortment of academic, musically related things. Not to mention a very impressive performance resume. She also has an impressive array of students to compare me with. So those of you who have assumed that this is the little old lady down the street can also SHOVE IT.

For those of you who have given contructive advice (positive or negative), without making biased assumptions: Thank you Very much for you time and thought.
 

Kikaku21

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There's a reason that, traditionally, people don't use piano teachers for their LoRs. Everyone has people in their life who will atest to how wonderful they are, how hard they work, etc. These people (piano teachers, parents, family friends, your Pediatrician) may write great letters, but they are inherrently biased, and not really comparing you to anyone else.

College professors, on the other hand, are comparing you to all the other smart, motivated students who come through their class. Faculty you did research with are comparing you to all the other students who did research with them. MDs you've shadowed are comparing you to all the other students they have seen come through. This is what the adcoms are really interested in: how you compare to every other smart, special, hard-working student whose app crosses their desk.

If you want to use personal references, more power to you. But don't be suprised if you are taken less seriously than the "gunner" who actually took time to impress a college faculty member and get an LoR from them. Anyone can get a fluffy letter from someone who's known them since they were a kid, but serious applicants get letters from folks whose position & title matters.

I particularly sick of you.

You don't think a piano teacher compares you to other students? You don't think a piano teacher can have a damn impressive "position and title"? You don't think I can go make friends with a professor and get a good letter, even if I made a B- in his class? You really think professor's make unbiased statements that reflect the reality of a students potential and academic ability? Impressing college faculty is a matter of going and talking to someone and showing a serious interest in going to medical school. THATS ALL IT IS most of the time. I know people who got good letters from profs that gave them C's. How impressive is that? Is it any wonder that 90% of LORs make it sound like the applicant walks on water? Do you think you might be a little judgemental. Maybe even outright immature?
 

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One thing that would give me pause if I were reading this letter is that it comes from a person you are paying to perform a service for you. I understand that in a sense you are also paying your professors for their services, but this is different. Your piano teacher's objectivity cannot be assumed.

If you have achieved something noteworthy as a pianist, I would list any awards, etc. among your EC's and leave it at that.
 

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There's nothing wrong with having one character reference in 6 letters. If you have six letters, and three of them come from classroom professors, one comes from a professor you did research with, and one from a physician you shadowed, then you should have something that attests to interests outside of medicine and/or from a person who knows you really well in a non-academic sense. You're treating people. It's nice to know whether or not you can relate to them in any sense.

Go for it!


I agree! Among my letters from professors, PI's, etc. I had a letter from the woman whose child I babysat for throughout college. She is someone who knows me very well and can testify to what kind of person I am. Apparently it stood out, as this is the only letter any of my interviewers have specifically referred to! I definitely think it's a good idea to get a letter from someone who can present a different side of you.
 

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i think if this is your extra letter (not one of your big 3 from professors, research investigators, and/or community service letters), this would be a good one.
Yourmom is right, OP. It shouldn't replace one of the "standard" LORs, but it makes a nice supplement.

If you are a four year college athelete, a letter from your coach is a nice touch. If you're a nontrad applicant from a professional background, a letter from your employer is smart. If music is a big part of your life and mentioned heavily in your application, a letter from your teacher is fine.

Folks with cookie cutter LORs have cookie cutter applications. Avoid the lemmings.
 

Kikaku21

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Yourmom is right, OP. It shouldn't replace one of the "standard" LORs, but it makes a nice supplement.

If you are a four year college athelete, a letter from your coach is a nice touch. If you're a nontrad applicant from a professional background, a letter from your employer is smart. If music is a big part of your life and mentioned heavily in your application, a letter from your teacher is fine.

Folks with cookie cutter LORs have cookie cutter applications. Avoid the lemmings.

Thats what I was thinking. It will be an EC on my AMCAS that I have been involved with for a very long time. I have had my current piano teacher for about 3 years and I think she can really speak to my passion for music, hard work, etc, etc.... Its a character builder, in ADDITION to the profs and clinical stuff.
 

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I am particularly sick of you.

Strong work! Someone needed to say it, and who better than the OP. Way to stand up for yourself against some of the most close-minded posts I've ever seen on SDN. I was embarrassed to read the first few responses.

Put the letter in the pile. I guarantee somebody will notice it, somebody will ask you about, and somebody will be happy to read something a little bit different from the 10,000 other letters they've been reading. None of my interviews asked me about my professor's letters, they all wanted to know about the other random people that wrote for me. Good luck! :thumbup:
 
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VandyXGirl

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Note to self, no longer giving pre-meds advice because all you do is get burned and get called names. You asked for opinions on a forum and based off the info you provided, we gave them to you. I wasn't trying to diss your piano teacher or your abilities to get other LORs, just telling you what I thought and I apologize if they came off as insincere, because I did not mean them to offend. Honestly, I was just telling you what I have heard throughout my own interview/application process about the types of LORs you want to put in your file.
 

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1st off. I'm getting kind of tired of the assumptions. Some people here are outright prejudiced. It would indeed be my 6th letter. I already have the mandatory 2 science letters, 1 non-science letter, letter from my boss (a PhD economist who I've been working with for 3 years), and a letter from the clinic manager that I have been volunteering for. So those of you who have ASSUMED that I am thinking of doing this because I am incapable of finding anyone else to say something decent about me can SHOVE IT.

Now for those of you who have made references about my piano teacher's credentials. My teacher has a PhD in piano performance from Yale, and she is regularly involved in an assortment of academic, musically related things. Not to mention a very impressive performance resume. She also has an impressive array of students to compare me with. So those of you who have assumed that this is the little old lady down the street can also SHOVE IT.

For those of you who have given contructive advice (positive or negative), without making biased assumptions: Thank you Very much for you time and thought.

HOLY **** - OP, are you kidding me?

These people have taken time out of their day to give you some answers to the question you asked above. If they made assumptions, its because their opinion required details that you did not give in your question.

Seriously - Don't you think that your Piano teacher's educational background was pertinent information here? What would you say if I asked you whether or not I should get a LOR from my trash collector? If you have any brains I'd hope you'd advise me NOT to get a LOR from my trash man. Wouldn't it be a little crazy for me to then respond:

"**** YOU for assuming that my trash collector is just this little old trash collector with no life and no educational background. You are pathetic... You should know my trash man got his Trash Collector's Cert. from Harvard and recently recieved the Nobel Peace Prize for his development of trash eating microbes!!"

If you are going to step up and ask a question, give the information. And if you don't, sit back, bite your tongue, and STFU before you make yourself look like an idiot.
 

PugMD

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Strong work! Someone needed to say it, and who better than the OP. Way to stand up for yourself against some of the most close-minded posts I've ever seen on SDN. I was embarrassed to read the first few responses.

Embarassed? Poor thing. I guess I am part of the minority that assumes a "piano teacher' doesn't usually indicate an ivy educated performer...

And if you consider the above some of the most "close-minded" posts floating around on these forums, I suggest you spend some more time looking around.
 

Kikaku21

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HOLY **** - OP, are you kidding me?

These people have taken time out of their day to give you some answers to the question you asked above. If they made assumptions, its because their opinion required details that you did not give in your question.

Seriously - Don't you think that your Piano teacher's educational background was pertinent information here? What would you say if I asked you whether or not I should get a LOR from my trash collector? If you have any brains I'd hope you'd advise me NOT to get a LOR from my trash man. Wouldn't it be a little crazy for me to then respond:

"**** YOU for assuming that my trash collector is just this little old trash collector with no life and no educational background. You are pathetic... You should know my trash man got his Trash Collector's Cert. from Harvard and recently recieved the Nobel Peace Prize for his development of trash eating microbes!!"

If you are going to step up and ask a question, give the information. And if you don't, sit back, bite your tongue, and STFU before you make yourself look like an idiot.

Do I think an educational background is pertinent information here? Perhaps, and maybe I should have given that information, despite the widely held claim that you should use references who know you best, not those with the highest titles.

Does my not giving that information imply that people should assume the least positive version of that exists? Probably not. Does my not giving that information imply that people should be totally obnoxious ****heads? Certainly not.

Look, people read this post and did one of two things. They were constructive, saying things like: "I think its a bad idea," and "Maybe if she has good credentials," etc... And then there are people who are not only totally non-constructive, but offensive. I understand not putting out an effort to give a constructive comment, but why go through the effort to treat someone like s***. I can see that you enjoy treating people like s***. Good for you.
 

Kikaku21

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Embarassed? Poor thing. I guess I am part of the minority that assumes a "piano teacher' doesn't usually indicate an ivy educated performer...

And if you consider the above some of the most "close-minded" posts floating around on these forums, I suggest you spend some more time looking around.

Just because there are more close-minded posts on this forum does not mean that such behavior is a good idea.

The problem around here is that people enjoy to antagonize others.
 

PugMD

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I can see that you enjoy treating people like s***. Good for you.

Actually if you rewind a bit to the top of this post you'll see that I gave an honest opinion and made no attempt at ridicule.

What you need to focus on here is the fact that you received responses based COMPLETELY on the information you supplied, or lack thereof. Don't get your little panties all twisted up because you didn't like the answer you received. We all know that most "piano teachers" dont have PhD's, so lets stop acting like that was implied or that is the norm.

By all means, get the LOR. But don't ask questions and ridicule other's for their opinions, especially when they are biased from a complete and utter lack of information on your end.
 

Kikaku21

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Actually if you rewind a bit to the top of this post you'll see that I gave an honest opinion and made no attempt at ridicule.

What you need to focus on here is the fact that you received responses based COMPLETELY on the information you supplied, or lack thereof. Don't get your little panties all twisted up because you didn't like the answer you received. We all know that most "piano teachers" dont have PhD's, so lets stop acting like that was implied or that is the norm.

By all means, get the LOR. But don't ask questions and ridicule other's for their opinions, especially when they are biased from a complete and utter lack of information on your end.

Again, my mistake for not providing information.

But seriously, the tone was extremely rude. Even now, you are telling me about my panties. How convenient that you have anonymity on this forum. There was never any need to be rude-- simply asking for more information would have been fine, but being an ass? There really isn't any justification for it. End of story.
 

PugMD

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Again, my mistake for not providing information.

But seriously, the tone was extremely rude. Even now, you are telling me about my panties. How convenient that you have anonymity on this forum. There was never any need to be rude-- simply asking for more information would have been fine, but being an ass? There really isn't any justification for it. End of story.

Justification? When you start calling people sh*theads for their responses to this question, you open yourself up to panty twists. It's SDN Policy. Ok, off to more exciting blabber.
 

weathertalk

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Embarassed? Poor thing. I guess I am part of the minority that assumes a "piano teacher' doesn't usually indicate an ivy educated performer...

And if you consider the above some of the most "close-minded" posts floating around on these forums, I suggest you spend some more time looking around.


Why do people always assume that ivy educations are the best?

Yale has a phenomenal school of music, however nothing close to the same could be said of the other ivies. I'd say the schools like julliard, oberlin, curtis, IU, and the mannes college of music at the new school would compose the top tier.
 

LizzyM

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And people wonder why it takes so long to hear back from the adcom!

Most adcom members I know read 200 files this year. So, expecting to read 600 LORs (in addition to AMCAS essays, supplemental essays, etc), imagine their dismay when there are 1,200 LORs to read.

If you've been out in the workforce, a letter from an employer is good. A letter from a Varsity coach or lab PI is very good (the PI letter is essential if you are an MD/PhD applicant).

Letters from the parents of children you've babysat, your neighbor, or your girlfriend's daddy are usually lame, even if the writer has a MD, PhD, DO.

Too many letters is like teaching a pig to sing -- it may waste your time and annoy the pig.
 

J1515

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This is some of the most ridiculous advice I've ever seen in my life. "Doctors are suppoesd to be well rounded, good working with people, blah blah blah...." When my sister was 17 she was giving piano lessons. ANYONE can give private piano lessons. You might as well have one of your friends who you play basketball with over the weekend write you a letter. Be normal and get normal letters of recs from QUALIFIED people - this way the letter will mean something. Hey, I can help someone push their stalled car out of the snow and ask them for a letter, right? Or how about the golf pro who gave me lessons and watched my dedication learning to hit a ball 200 yards? What about the tennis pro who gave me tennis lessons?

It's amazing how pre-meds give out advice as if they have any clue as to what they're talking about, or based on "speaking with" their uncle/father/several doctors who told them/numerous members of the admissions committee/etc... Of course this is being written by just a lowly DO, so take it for what it's worth.
 

VandyXGirl

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Um, you know that you asked for "advice and input", right? I mean, you did start this thread, and you specifically asked what other users here thought the adcoms would think. So sorry you didn't get the answers you wanted.

In the future I will avoid answering your questions until I determine what answer you want to hear. Enjoy your rejection letters.

Tired, thank you for saying exactly what I wanted to say so perfectly (both in this post and the previous one). People on SDN and in life need to learn to chill.
 

PugMD

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I told myself I wouldn't waste anymore time in this ridiculous thread, but I couldn't resist saying thank you to Tired. Your response is brilliant - if only it came about a couple days ago! ...anything to supply a heavy dose of STFU.
 

Kikaku21

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Um, you know that you asked for "advice and input", right? I mean, you did start this thread, and you specifically asked what other users here thought the adcoms would think. So sorry you didn't get the answers you wanted.

In the future I will avoid answering your questions until I determine what answer you want to hear. Enjoy your rejection letters.

As I can see, like PugMD, you are a little slow. Let me be very clear: There is a difference between asking for opinions and inviting people to be asses. Reread your first posts in response to my question. You were outright insulting! If you felt I should have provided more information, you could have asked for it, or simply ignored the question and gotten on with your life.

INSTEAD YOU TOOK TIME OUT OF YOUR DAY SPECIFICALLY TO BE AN A**HOLE. PugMD did EXACTLY the same thing. This is what I am complaining about. Do you think it might be in your best interest to be a little more sensitive to the way you treat people? I mean, presumably you DO want to be a doctor. If you are an ass, yeah, I'm gonna call you on it.

This has NOTHING to do with not getting the "answers I wanted." I fully appreciate a negative answer-- If it is indeed a bad idea to have a piano teacher write a letter, perhaps a negative answer could prevent me from making a mistake. The problem I have is with your assinine tone, followed by your hostility.

Again-- Reread your posts and ask yourself this question: Would you treat someone you were facing in person in this manner?
 

Kikaku21

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They would take one look at the letter and think to themselves, "Wow, this loser couldn't even get their college professors to write them a letter. Toss this app in the trash."

Just to point out the obvious.

This is your FIRST response to my post.

Yeah sure dude... It was the negative response that pissed me off. Not the totally patronizing ****head tone you took on.
 

Phil Anthropist

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In highly charged threads with controversial topics, it's just a matter of time before name-calling, other personal attacks, and profanity ensue. But in a thread entitled "LOR from Piano Teacher?" The Precipitato movement of Prokofiev's 7th Sonata doesn't even contain this much rage! :p

Seriously though, you guys need to chill.



P.S. I agree with weathertalk about the music schools. The most elite conservatories in the US are usually not associated with Ivy Leagues or other prestigious universities (the Peabody Institute of Johns Hopkins is an exception).
 

Kikaku21

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In highly charged threads with controversial topics, it's just a matter of time before name-calling, other personal attacks, and profanity ensue. But in a thread entitled "LOR from Piano Teacher?" The Precipitato movement of Prokofiev's 7th Sonata doesn't even contain this much rage! :p

Seriously though, you guys need to chill.



P.S. I agree with weathertalk about the music schools. The most elite conservatories in the US are usually not associated with Ivy Leagues or other prestigious universities (the Peabody Institute of Johns Hopkins is an exception).

I have to say. If I ever had any idea that this topic, which seems so benign, would cause such a problem, I wouldn't have bothered.
 
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