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Low GPA/advice

Discussion in 'Pre-Medical - MD' started by purpletulipa, Dec 4, 2002.

  1. purpletulipa

    purpletulipa Junior Member
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    I graduated in 1999 in with a BS in Psychology from Iowa State University.
    During college I worked at a nursing home for one summer and worked as a
    phlebotomist for one year. After graduation I worked as a nurse assistant for
    a Dermatology Clinic. Since then I have been working at a corporate office in
    the Information Technology Department.

    I have an extreme desire to attend medical school and to become a physician.
    Unfortunately I wasn?t as focused in college and received a 2.7 GPA. I would
    like to retake some of the premed courses and sit for the MCAT.

    Is there any advice on what to do for admission into medical school? I have heard that the caribbean med schools are a little easier to get into... anyone know more information about them or recommend a particular school?
    Thank you.
     
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  3. TeinVI

    TeinVI Membership Revoked
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    you probably know that a 2.7 isn't gonna cut it for us allopathic schools save howard and meharry (j/k). no, seriously, u need to do some sort of post-bac program and try to get close to a 4.0 and ace ur mcats. your ecs looks fine to me. do a search on post-bac programs and u should get plenty of results.
     
  4. xaelia

    xaelia neenlet
    Physician Faculty 10+ Year Member

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    Yep, you need to take the premed courses, and, potentally, even some more upper level science courses to prove to schools that you're academically capable of succeeding in medical school. I'd imagine that something >3.7ish would make you reasonably competitive again.

    I had a 2.99 overall from Stanford when I graduated with a non-premedical background. A couple years later, I did the Bryn Mawr Postbac Program for a 3.95 and had a 35S on the MCAT, and I've been admitted at a couple respectable schools and still waiting to hear back post-interview from several top 20ish medical schools. If your GPA is weak, I can't underemphasize the importance of scoring exceptionally on the MCAT.
     
  5. The Hulk

    The Hulk Official Green Monster
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    I second what Xaelia said... I had a 3.1 at Wesleyan University with a non-premed background and went back several years later at Harvard to do a post-bac, which I'm currently in now... here's a Syracuse webiste which has alot of well-organized, up to date info on what is out there for you to look at...

    http://www-hl.syr.edu/hpap/LISTPB.HTM

    TH
     
  6. beanbean

    beanbean 1K Member
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    A low undergrad gpa is by no means a death sentence. It is important, as the other posters have mentioned, to take some post-bacc courses and do VERY WELL, and really show them what you've got with a high MCAT score. It is not necessary to enroll in a formal post-bacc program; however, there are some excellent ones out there. I am currently a UCONN post-bacc student and the experience has been fantastic. I do believe it is key to take a full course load, if at all possible, to show that you can indeed handle the workload. If you are unable to do that due to work or other issues, at least take as many courses concurrently as you can. Some people with low undergrad GPAs are fine at getting A's when they take one course at a time, but have difficulty managing a hectic schedule. Push yourself to do a semester or two full time or at least several classes plus a job to show everyone your ability, determination and drive.

    Best of luck. The more knowledge you have about the process the better you can plan your attack and be successful. The MCAT Forum on SDN is a great source for MCAT info, study guides, and testing techniques. Plan everything out and take it a step at a time.
     
  7. DarkChild

    DarkChild Senior Member
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    chandler - do you really ride?
    the hulk - my brother goes to wesleyan
    apparently hewitt was named one of the most sexually active dorms in the country :laugh: too bad when I asked my brother he said he didnt know anything about that :rolleyes:
    :D
    btw - the hulk how's the app process going for you? I know some people who were thinking about the harvard program too - it seems pretty cool.
    OP - not trying to hijack the thread. your low GPA isnt a death sentence. Take classes at a strong post-bacc program (Columbia has one too), get a respectable MCAT score (30) and you should be fine. Also you want to think long and hard about your LORs - unless you've kept up with your undergrad professors, you're going to have to get those from your post-bacc classes. I would suggest taking upper level bio classes were the classes are smaller to try and get a rec. - also working in a lab (even P/T) is a great way to get a rec. too.
    good luck!!
    Oh - (flame suit secured) check out the osteopathic schools as well. With a DO, you're still a doctor and still practice medicine just like an MD - but from what I understand, osteopathic schools focus on a holistic view of the body and treatment. But the relevant thing is that they're easier to get into than most allopathic schools. a couple friends of mine are in osteopathic schools and they really like it. check out the pre-osteopathic and osteopathic forums on this board. there's lot of really great advice there.
     
  8. DannyWSP

    DannyWSP Junior Member
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    If this is the way you decide to go, the website below gives a listing and contact information for schools that have formal post-bacc. programs. There are many varying opinions as to the merits of the formal program versus going to a state school as an unmatriculated student. Do a forum search of post bacc to find more information.

    Also, if you already have some/most of the pre-reqs. you may want to look at schools that are less structured or offer programs that specifically enhance your previous record. The majority of post bacc programs are for career changers.

    Hope this provides a good starting place and good luck.

    http://www.aamc.org/students/considering/postbac.htm
     
  9. DannyWSP

    DannyWSP Junior Member
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    If this is the way you decide to go, the website below gives a listing and contact information for schools that have formal post-bacc. programs. There are many varying opinions as to the merits of the formal program versus going to a state school as an unmatriculated student. Do a forum search of post bacc to find more information.

    Also, if you already have some/most of the pre-reqs. you may want to look at schools that are less structured or offer programs that specifically enhance your previous record. The majority of post bacc programs are for career changers.

    Hope this provides a good starting place and good luck.

    http://www.aamc.org/students/considering/postbac.htm
     

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