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Loyola vs MCW

Discussion in 'Pre-Medical - MD' started by sotired, Apr 19, 2007.

  1. sotired

    sotired sotired
    2+ Year Member

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    loyola seems like the better choice for me personally, but i just wanted to get the perspectives of others, too...
     
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  3. sotired

    sotired sotired
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  4. 146233

    146233 Phthirius pubis

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    They are both wonderful schools. Loyola's facilities are a little older than MCW (M-cow)'s. They are both Level 1 Trauma Centers (MCW has Froedtert). MCW has a children's hospital on the campus, whereas Loyola does not -- although their PICU is quite impressive.

    Loyola will be coming from the Jesuit/Catholic tradition. I personally feel I'll be a better fit with Loyola as well (did my undergrad there -- see below), but I'm sure we'd both be happy at either school.


    Good luck,
    -z
     
  5. brats800

    brats800 cheesehead
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    i had to make this decision a couple years ago. for me, MCW was even sweeter with the in-state tuition. but it came down to me getting the better vibe from loyola. i am very impressed with the academics, the students, and (of course) the gym at loyola, among other things. i know i would have been very happy at MCW, but i just liked loyola more. good luck. it's a good problem to have to make a decision between the two schools.
     
  6. davematthews

    davematthews Senior Member
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    Honestly, you would be NUTS not to go to Loyola. Facilities are not aged at all-lol
    MOre than half of their facilites currently are no more than a decade old. When they finish construction half will be less than five years old. That school/place is at the greatest height they have ever been and they are not even close to peaking. There research grants and emphasis has been ignited quite well and they will be on the map in no time. NO offense to MCW, but you absolutely cannot compare the two cities at all- it would be silly to try. It is not an argument it is just a fact based on what the cities have to offer.
    The culture, sites, people, colleges, size and diversity of medical establishments, beauty, restaurants, concerts, architecture, and beach (yeah beach) etc dwarfs Milwaukee.

    PLus Everyone I have ever talked to is in love with Loyola- never seen that at any other school in the midwest and I know people that go everywhere. I lived in Chicago for 7 years and it is AMAZING so I am not just saying second hand. And yes I have been to Milwaukee plenty of times, too. Very nice, but it's no Chicago.
    Just my opinion... no actually it is a fact :)
    Go to Loyola. It is no offense to MCW which really is a GREAT school, but it is an honest answer.
    peace
    BTW- it is easy to go to Loyola and not experience the city too much because of the heacy workload and choice of where you live. Definintely live in the city at some point in your time there and go to the city and take advantage- otherwise you will miss out. (I say this because a lot of people have told me they wish they had taken adavantage of it while they had it- dont make that mistake. You have the advantage of knowing now. I loved it and lived it :) GO SOX!!
     
  7. riceman04

    10+ Year Member

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    26. Loyola University*____________
    First Year Student Budget: $52,870 Score: 1.25
    Financial Aid/etc…: several low interest loans supported directly by the university (like the “Independent Loan”)….there are two primary merit based scholarships (that’s cool), one of which caters primarily to URM’s (awesome) and to those with a demonstrated commitment to serving underserved communities. % of students receiving financial aid: 93%, Average amount per scholarship/grant: $9,704, Average 2005 graduate indebtedness: $136,791 Score: 4
    Curriculum/etc…: This school maintains a “Hybrid”/Competency based curriculum…basic science based (with active learning integration) in addition to an early focus on developing skills in communicating with patients, taking a history, and performing a physical examination. All courses feature a combination of lecture and small-group experiences. Some courses have other learning formats, such as required laboratory sessions. Practical experience in the fundamentals of clinical medicine is provided by the Introduction to the Practice of Medicine course (IPM), which is actually a 3 year interdisciplinary course. Lectures are used as a guide to active learning with extensive small group and case-based sessions during the first two years (cool). There is a large emphasis on information technology at this school…they have implemented the use of “LUMEN” (Loyola University Medical Education Network), which offers supplemental course material, interactive educational formats, and resources for in depth study. Loyola has a very technologically advanced Clinical Skills Center, which features 14 (yes 14…hahahaha) examination rooms that are all equipped with video cameras. This plays a major role in their competency based curriculum. Standardized patients are also used! This school emphasizes what they call “Adult Learning,” which simply refers to the fact that they encourage active learning. I do want to point out, though, that as part of their system students must demonstrate their competency through clinical exercises, such as history taking and giving physical examinations. A computerized simulation is then completed to ensure that students are capable of making an accurate diagnosis and making preliminary treatment plans (niiiiiiiiiice). Before I move on, I do want to point out that Loyola has a Multi-Function Laboratory (MFL)….ohhhhh it looks nice!!!!! Clinical Clerkships: 3rd year consists of the typical clerkships…Medicine (12 weeks), Medicine Subintership (8 weeks), OB/GYN (6 weeks), Pediatrics (6 weeks), Psychiatry (6 weeks), Neurology (4 weeks)…there are also a number of electives from which one can choose for both 3rd and 4th year. Did I point out that fourth year consists of nothing but subinternships (i.e more specialized experiences…but I think this is standard). There is ample opportunity to do away rotations &/or international clerkships. Oh yeah…one more thing…courses in bioethics and epidemiology are offered too! Grading System: 4 intervals (Honors/High Pass/Pass/Fail or equivalent) for all 4 years.
    Score: 15+++++++++++++
    #Affiliated Hospitals/Facilites: 4 primary hospitals with over 18 specialized healthcare facilities (they look kind of like Kaiser…small centers scattered all over the place) Score: 5.5 (b/c of the number of supportive facilities)
    Selection Factors: Private, Rolling, no known state preference but Illinois residents make up 46% of the class…so interpret those numbers however you want, Age Range: 20 – 33, Avg. Non-Sciece GPA: 3.69, Avg. Science GPA: 3.54, Avg. Overall GPA: 3.62, Overall Median GPA: 3.67, Science Median GPA: 3.6, Avg. MCAT: 29.6P (Breakdown: V: 9.5, P: 9.9, B: 10.2), Median MCAT: 30Q (Range: V: 6 – 14, P: 7 – 15, B: 8 – 15, writing: K – S), 7735 (4413 completed applications) for 531 interview slots Score: 6.5
    Diversity (here is where they falter…that’s why it is the one stat they don’t list…no need to be shy about it Loyola…lol): 9% URM, 27% minority (hahahahaha…what a joke). Score: 6.25
    Dual Degree Options: MD/PhD, MD/MA Bioethics, MD/MA Health Policy (I like this option) Score: 3.75
    Student Support: Campus Ministry has a strong presence at this school (Well, it is a Jesuit school). They sponsor a portion of the curriculum that emphasized the integration of spirituality and medicine. But I think what makes this school so attractive, despite its religious ties (and I in no way think religion is a bad thing) is the fact that the concept is not shoved down ones throat (I, myself, am a growing religious person, but I am still trying to work out my belief in the mutual coexistence of religion and medicine…if that makes any sense). Health Science Library (nothing to holler and rave about…but it still seems nice); they have an office of Minority Affairs and an SNMA (I have never seem them in action though b/c the chapter is so small and probably does not travel much). Several student organizations (not as many at other schools though…probably b/c the school is so much smaller)…many different interests; typical student affairs office that offers student career advising/counseling and organizes peer and faculty tutoring (it is all part of the Teaching & Learning Center; They also have a Clinical Skills Center (very very advanced)…that I mentioned already above. Overall good support. One more thing: The students are paired with advisors that they stay with for the entire four years (as part of building a relationship). Score: 8
    Housing: no campus housing (on or affiliated off), apartments immediately surrounding the campus. They provide a full off campus housing packet. Score: 2
    Location: Maywood Illinois…12 miles outside of downtown Chi-town…but close enough that you still get some of the inner-city patient overflow. It is more so in the burbs…but the patient population is still very diverse. Chi-town is Chi town…very cool city…cold winters…hot and muggy summers….my sister and my niece and nephew live here…so I’m sold…great transportation into the city Score: 5
    Class Size: 140 (a total of 290 are accepted…so 55% interviewees are accepted…26% of interviewees matriculate) Score: 4
    Residency Match List: 49% of past graduates have entered primary care residency programs, and you know where the other 51% went…hahahaha
    Volunteer/Research Opportunities: Many of the school sponsored community outreach events are run by Campus Ministry…the programs that they run are amaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaazing!!!!!...absolutely amazing….here’s an example: “Fall Urban Plunge”: During Fall Break, Ministry Staff organize with students the Fall Urban Plunge, which generally takes place over 2 days in a central city Chicago neighborhood. The group stays overnight in a local church or shelter (even sometimes with families) and spends the days both serving and learning about life in the community. Among the projects with which our students have worked during Urban Plunges include the following: soup kitchens and food pantries, schools and after school programs, drug/alcohol rehab centers, medical clinics, gang intervention centers, community centers, ESL programs, and community development projects. The Urban Plunge has taken place in these communities in Chicago’s West and Southwest sides since its inception in 2001: Pilsen/Little Village, Austin, Lawndale, and Garfield Park. There are plenty other programs that are just as amazing. The best and very original (at least from what I’ve seen)!!!!!! There are school organized opportunities for international immersion trips (awesome…the video sold me completely!!!! I don’t care what score this school gets…I am applying for sure). Several of the student organizations not under the Campus Ministries Umbrella also organize several volunteer events in the inner-city communities of Chicago. Research: Loyola heavily promotes interdisciplinary research (many other schools do too). 6 core research facilities (a little on the low side…but not bad at all)…This school excels in three areas of research: cancer, cardiovascular, and neuroscience. This school sponsors an eight week Medical Student Summer Research Program (stipend given also). Short-term research opportunities are available also. Total NIH research funding: $22,020,353 (89th), Total NIH supported research funding: $21,254,648 Score: 10.75 (b/c their volunteering opportunities are amazing…out of this world…some of which are spiritually influenced)
    Miscellaneous: This school exudes a very homey feel. Of course people are told to put their best foot forward. But considering that all schools supposedly put their best foot forward, Loyola impressed me. I’m just not happy with the % of minorities (URM’s in particular). Maybe that’s why they are offering scholarships specifically for URM’s (in an attempt to increase representation at their school). The videos gave good (planned of course) insight into what the university is really like…lot of different videos. Overall I like this school (based on its presentation)…there are just a few things that irk me…I still like it though Score: 3+++++++

    Total Score: NO FULL SCORE ASSIGNED UNTIL ALL SCHOOLS COMPLETED…HELPS PREVENT ANY POSSIBLE INLETS FOR BIAS
     
  8. riceman04

    10+ Year Member

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    38. Medical College of Wisconsin______
    First Year Student Budget: $46,133 Score: 3
    Financial Aid/etc…: This school actually gives ok financial aid packages…Of course aid to govt loan programs. School maintains several loan programs…Institutional Aid Loans…a large number…many with great interest rates…also many private educational loan programs. MCW also maintains an Emergency Loan Program (obviously for when other loans do not suffice). Some private institutional loans are only made accessible to Wisconsin residents. Scholarships: offer a significant number of merit based and need-based scholarships…some scholarships only available to Wisconsin residents. % of Enrolled Students Receiving Financial Aid: 95%, Average Amount per Scholarship/Grant: $7,953, Average 2005 Graduate Indebtedness: $131,860 Score: 4.25
    Curriculum/etc…: Integrated curriculum…specifically MCW employs “vertical” and “horizontal” integration. Vertical integration: “…interweaving of clinical skills and knowledge into the basic science years and, in turn, reinforcing and continuing to teach basic science concepts as they apply during the clinical years.” Horizontal Integration: “…identifying concepts or skills, particularly those that are clinically relevant, that cut across, for example, the basic sciences and then using these as an integrated focus for presentations, clinical examples, and course materials.” Specifics: This school uses a mix of organ based and traditional presentation of material…I know for sure that their anatomy, physiology, and pathology courses rely on an organ-based format. Of course your typical first year courses include: biochemistry, clinical human anatomy, physiology, cell and tissue biology, neurosciences… I do want to emphasize that case based learning/PBL is implemented on DAY 1 of the first year curriculum and is continued through second year…the “Clinical Continuum” provides students with an introduction to clinical skills and early patient contact… provides the students with integrated early generalist experiences, the fundamental skills (medical interviewing) and attitudes of professional development, and knowledge in: human behavior, bioethics, care of the terminally ill, information managements, physical diagnosis, and health care systems, and a clinical mentor course during the first year. During second year the “Clinical Continuum” course consists of health policy and ethics, medical ethics and palliative care, and clinical examination and reasoning….It is structured so that what is covered in this class parallels what is learned in basic science courses. Third year: Just so you know…all students get PDA’s…and they are heavily incorporated into the 3rd and 4th year curriculum. The PDA’s are used to in every aspect of clerkships…they are used to take notes on patient encounters (interviews, vitals, etc…)…they are also used to store important clinical facts,etc…After PDA's are dispersed, students are expected to learn skills in tracking clinical experiences using certain forms on their PDA's, performing regular hot syncs, downloading third party applications from the Internet, and applying evidence-based medicine applications to clinical experiences. Clerkships: The typical ones (i.e. mandatory): Family Medicine (from the chart I think 6 weeks…no written out times so I am guesstimating), Pediatrics (maybe six weeks), OB/GYN (6 weeks), Psych. Neuro. (6 weeks), Medicine (usually the longest clerkship), Clinical Procedures (includes Anesthesiology, Trauma Surgery, and Emergency Medicine…cool), Surgery, and an elective vacation. If students choose not to take the elective vacation…that time carries over into fourth year and can be applied to the existing 4th year vacation…Also, students may select a two-week, non-graded elective experience or a four-week graded elective experience (several electives to choose from). 4th year: students consolidate knowledge acquired during the third year. This year is much more flexible with four months of required rotations and 5 months of electives…along with 3 months of vacation…much of which is used for travel during post-graduate application process. Students take on two subinternship responsibilities during required rotations in primary care specialities (Internal Medicine, Family and Community Medicine, Pediatrics) and surgically oriented specialties (surgical subspecialties, OBGYN, Anesthesiology). Requirements are completed with two rotations, one in the Department of Medicine and one Integrated Selective. Integrated Selectives: courses that either present a multi-disciplinary approach to patient care or integrates previously learned basic science topics with clinical practice. Selectives are focused around major subspecialty areas, such as cardiology, nephrology, women’s health, management of breast disorders, mechanisms of disease in an aging population, etc… Students have many electives (over 200) from which to choose. Students in “good standing” may take up to four or five away rotations. Speaking of away rotations: both national and international away rotations available to students in “good standing.” Would be a good time to get out of the cold. Other curriculum highlights: There are two alternate curriculum tracks available both of which offer an extended version of the curriculum: 1. The Five Year Curriculum – offered to those who have demonstrated some academic difficulty (based on Unit I exam). Basic science courses are broken up into two years…2. The Extended Curriculum – curriculum offered to students for personal or non-academic reasons. Students can enter program, for instance, if they are interested in pursuing research or other academic activities prior to clinical years….Research Honors Program: Students who are interested in gaining extended research experience can pursue this…16+ weeks of rigorous research with an advisor (overseer). Research can be completed in a number of ways…e.g. over 2 summers, or 1 summer and on part-time basis during the school year…After completion and approval of culminating honors thesis students receive “Honors in Research” distinction on diploma. Geriatrics Curriculum Initiative – Initiative is meant to further incorporate Gerontology/Geriatric Medicine in undergraduate medical education…integrated longitudinally throughout the extent of the curriculum. Presentation predicated on specific virtual geriatric cases. Aids to student learning/curricular innovations: Standardized Patient program – involves trained actors to take on role displaying specific medical conditions…program has been major part of many med school curriculums for decades….STAR Center: stands for Standardized Teaching and Assessment Resource Center…8200 square foot high-tech clinical training resource…Contains simulation labs, contains 12 standardized patient examination rooms, pediatric computer model driven mannequins that respond physiologically and pharmacodynamically like humans…allow for practice of many medical procedures; computers and recording tools also present in examination rooms for recording purposes. Students can also practice inputting notes on the standardized patients they evaluate, cameras present as well…as you can see this school is very technologically advanced. STAR Center is location where students given an objective structured clinical exam (OSCE)...basically is an exam meant to assess student clinical skills….exam taken near end of clinical rotations…helps to prepare students for STEP-2….oh and I did mention the use of PDA’s already Grading Intervals: 5 interval grading system (Honors/High Pass/Pass/Low Pass/Fail). Score: 15+++++++++++
    #Affiliated Hospitals/Clinical Facilities: 3 major hospital affiliates (including a Children’s Hospital)…total # of hospital affiliates: 17+…also many major affiliated clinics and outpatient centers Score: 9+++++++++++++++++
    Selection Factors: Private, rolling admissions, some state preference given to residents (but not nearly as much as Baylor gives to Texas residents…but still enough to make me wary), Avg. GPA (2006): 3.72, Overall Median GPA: 3.77, Median Science GPA: 3.73, Mean Numeric MCAT: 10P, Median MCAT: 30P…Breakdown: P: 10, V: 10, B: 10 (Ranges: P: 3 – 14, V: 4 – 14, B: 5 – 14), 5,787 total applications for 675 interview slots, strong commitment to diversity (so they say). Score: 4.5
    Diversity: approximately 8% URM (once again…very low) maybe this is due to its location in the US…there could be oter factors that matriculant #’s may hide…20% Minority Score: 5.5
    Dual Degree Options: MD/PhD, MD/MA (Bioethics), MD/MS (several options) Score: 6.25 b/c so many options are available
    Student Support: Dedicated Office of Student Affairs/Diversity seeking to ensure that qualified students from diverse backgrounds are admitted (deemed to contribute to diversity if you fit at least one of six categories…see website if want specifics…but I can tell you that based on the factors I DO NOT contribute to diversity of their student body…hahahahaha…fair…but funny. Definitely does not seem as strong as similar offices at other schools (at least for diversity oriented programs…see Jefferson above) Office also generally provides support services to enhance academic learning…it organizes small-group tutoring services, coordinates the Clinical Advisor Program, organizes careers in medicine and time management workshops, and personal assessment meetings (personality inventories, skill and value assessments, etc.)…other special programs are organized as well. Specifics: Tutorial Programs – free tutoring programs that rely on graduate students specializing in a specific field or upper-level med students who excelled in the specific course…small group formats are used to review course content knowledge, sharpen problem solving skills, develop efficient learning strategies, and prepare for course exams. Clinical Advisor Program: Students are paired with clinical advisors (beginning 3rd year…according to what I found…that is kind of late) and discuss all things related to clinical rotations and possible choices for future medical career. Does not seem as supportive (on paper) as other advisor programs at other schools. General Academic Advising – pretty standard stuff…Office of Academic Support Services offers both individualized and group sessions on matters such as adjustment to medical school, learning strategies, knowledge organization, note-taking, exam-prep, etc… MCW Peer Advising Program – pretty much upper-level students provide one on one advising to first (and second) year students on several topics relating to medical school…topics often overlap with those that are discussed in the other advising programs…just have the opportunity to interact with students instead. Non-Tradition Student Support Group – forum for Non-trads to meet one another and discuss any issues that may be unique to them (hahaha me)…that’s cool. Glaxo Pathway Evaluation Program – decision support system model designed to guide (read influence) medical students through the medical specialty selection process. Workshops offered through program for MSII through MSIV…Libraries: student have access to 3 libraries – one main and two branch libraries…use of integrated library system allows for easy access to materials (even while not at a particular site). Student Support Services – service created to assist students in prepping and organizing for (large) events (both social and outreach)…Student Organizations: several student organizations/interest groups (actually mostly specialty interest groups)…SNMA chapter present on campus (although I question how strong it is considering the relatively few matriculating afr. amer per class). La Raza Medical Association (La RaMa) also present on campus…Of course we have already discussed major curricular support components such as the PDA program, Standardized Patient Program, and the clinical skills center (STAR Center). Overall student support not bad at all Score: 6
    Housing: NO on campus housing, no affiliated off-campus housing…however, an abundance of affordable off campus housing. School maintains a website dedicated to helping students find adequate housing and roommates since they offer no on campus housing Score: 1.75
    Location: Milwaukee…medium sized city…fairly diverse considering location in the US…diversity permits diverse clinical opportunities, not far from Chi-town…definitely a bar town…growing cultural scene…of course horrible winter weather…which probably makes for some pretty bearable summer weather…I might be mistaken Score: 4.25
    Class Size: 204…so approx. 29% of interviewees matriculate…a larger percentage of students are accepted Score: 5++++++++
    Residency Match List: 45% of past graduates have entered primary care residency programs, 55% of past graduates have obviously entered non-primary post-graduate residency programs
    Volunteer & Research Opportunities: School seems very clinically oriented…and thus maintains a vast array of many clinically based outreach programs and has developed many community partnership initiatives. This school has in fact won several awards for the partnerships they have established (pretty awesome…kudos in my book). Partnerships serve as the cornerstone of community and public health at MCW…Community partnerships are organized into 5 categories: MCW Departmental Centers and Collaborative Programs, Community Clinics, Community Engagement in Translational Research, Healthier Wisconsin Partnership Program (HWPP), and Healthier Wisconsin Leadership Institute (HWLI)…MCW Departmental Centers and Collaborative Programs (I won’t comment on all just a few): Center for the Advancement of Underserved Children – Awesome center and right up my alley…center encompasses research projects, clinical programs, educational initiatives, and advocacy work…goal is to improve the health and well being of underserved children….has developed a few initiatives with community partners, such as La Causa, La Casa de Esperanza, The Boys and Girls Club of America, Milwaukee SCORES, etc…; Center for AIDS and Intervention Research – cool, I am doing research in this area right now; Center for Healthy Communities – Mission: Health promotion and education in communities, research and evaluation on community identified needs, and community-responsive education for medical students and residents, Goals: Develop, implement, and sustain community-academic partnerships that promote health, Conduct and disseminate research to address community-identified health needs that includes a participatory model, Conduct research that can influence and inform health policy and advocacy activities, Integrate principles and practices of community health and community-academic partnerships into the Medical College of Wisconsin, and Integrate principles and practices of community health and community-academic partnerships into the Medical College of Wisconsin…also has implemented major initiatives and developed several partnerships with community organizations; Center for Science, Health and Society; Injury Research Center; Special Pediatrics Programs….Community Clinics: Downtown Health Center; Hypertension, Elevated Lipids and Diabetes (HELD) Screening Venue - traveling screening clinic that sets up once a week at one of the Milwaukee Public Housing Sites. They screen all people interested in having their risk for cardiovascular disease assessed by taking a brief family history, social and dietary history…take a blood pressure, blood sugar and blood total cholesterol; all of these factors are then combined to assess each individual's risk for cardiovascular diseases. Each student doctor will see a patient through the entire process…cool that med students play significant role in this community clinic initiative…clinic in operation 3 weekends per month, MCW/Westside Healthcare Inc. Project – joint initiative created to continue providing clinical services to inner-city services; MCW/Milwaukee County GAMP Primary Care Partnership; Saturday Clinic for the Uninsured – goals: 1)provide quality health care for our patients, 2) provide a community-based, educational experience for undergraduate medical students, 3) work with community partners and underserved providers to integrate services, and 4) increase awareness of health policy issues surrounding the uninsured and underinsured in the community….students are heavily involved in this clinic…clinic has won awards for service provided…Community Engagement in Translational Research: NIH funded research…research based on four principles: 1. Collaboration, 2. Education, 3. Facilitation, 4. Transformation…HWPP: pretty obvious (see above for acronym meaning)…Receives decent amount of funding…either through developmental awards or impact awards….HWLI: continuing education and training resource for leaders in healthcare and community related activities. Several student organizations heavily involved in coordinating volunteer. Awesome opportunities overall!!!! Other community outreach programs include summer enrichment programs (AIM and MSRTP), and programs sponsored by SNMA and LaRAMA. Research: formal and informal research opportunities…but I must say that this is not a very research oriented school (not to say that great research is not being conducted here)…in addition to the “Extended Curriculum (Research Honors Program)” option for pursuing research opportunities, students can participate in summer externships: students can participate in this during the summer after the first year…non-credit experience in either basic science research or in a clinical area of medicine….Medical Student Summer Research Program: allows students to explore careers in cutting edge biomedical research and academic medicine, gain research tools applicable to clinical practice, add distinction to your medical school CV, develop mentoring associations with faculty preceptors…Is an 8 to 12 week summer research fellowship program available to M1’s, M2’s, and early decision entering M1’s who wish to participate in an intensive, hands-on research experience in one of the many outstanding biomedical or clinical research laboratories of faculty investigators at the Medical College of Wisconsin. Students are integrated into the laboratory environment and actively participate as members of the research team, under the supervision of faculty preceptors…this program is geared towards students who have little to no prior research experience (cool)…students receive a monthly stipend of $1700 through a T-35 Training Grant from National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI) and a R-25 grant from the National Cancer Institute (NCI). As part of fellowship students attend enrichment seminars, create and present a poster for end of fellowship poster sessions, and they write an abstract of their research…participation in program can lead to an “Honors in Research Distinction” if at least 16 weeks of lab research and complete a research thesis by 1st semester of the M4 year…MCW has several federally designated research centers, including and AIDS Intervention Research Center…and some institutes…I see no mention of Howard Hughes though (yeah that’s a big research institute)…state of the art research facilities (though not as extensive as some other schools)…over past 9 years NIH research funding has increased by approximately 232.2%...MCW is consistently adding to its research facilities: opened a new Biomedical Research Building and children’s Research Institute facility, cancer pavilion, addition to the Blood Center of Wisconsin’s Blood Research Institute. Total NIH Funding: $84,030,609 (rank: 46th), Total NIH funding for research: $81,206,791. Score: 10.25
    Miscellaneous: Supposedly have a significant commitment to diversity…they have implemented specific standards to recruit people (notice I did not say minority or URM) from specific backgrounds. Cool set of videos…always a plus for me…I’m a visual kind of guy…hahahaha…cool workout center. Overall seems like a cool place…just so far north and seems (as of late) to become very “numbers driven.” I like that this school is so community oriented Score: 3

    Total Score: NO FULL SCORE ASSIGNED UNTIL ALL SCHOOLS COMPLETED…HELPS PREVENT ANY POSSIBLE INLETS FOR BIAS
     
  9. sotired

    sotired sotired
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    thanks for your input, i was curious as to others' opinions, but most of you seem to reaffirm my leanings. having grown up in milwaukee but having gone to college in chicago (err...outside of it in evanston), i think i'd much rather be at loyola rather than mcw
     
  10. sotired

    sotired sotired
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    also riceman - where did that info come from?
     
  11. riceman04

    10+ Year Member

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    school websites, MSAR, and www.aamc.org
     

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