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Mac or PC for ortho residency????

Discussion in 'Dental Residents and Practicing Dentists' started by dds854, May 1, 2007.

  1. dds854

    dds854 New Member

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    Is the ortho software (Dolphin I think it is called) that most programs use available for Macs?
     
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  3. ItsGavinC

    Dentist Moderator Emeritus

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    I don't know if it is available for Macs or not. My guess would be no. But that doesn't mean you can have a Mac and use it if you really want to. It just means you won't be using it under OS X, you'll be using it under Windows XP or Vista on your Mac (you'll have to have a license to use them).
     
  4. dds854

    dds854 New Member

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    So if I run Windows or Vista on a Mac, will it be more susceptible to all the PC viruses? (forgive my ignorance, I know very little about computers)
     
  5. ItsGavinC

    Dentist Moderator Emeritus

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    The susceptibility would be the same as it is for any other hardware running Windows. The OS X partition, however, would remain virus-free, even if the Windows partition was infected (which it would be). In lay terms, it isn't the hardware (the laptop itself) that gets infected with viruses, it's the software (or operating system) running on the hardware. Mac OS X would not be affeced by any viruses picked up while using Windows on it.

    My thought is that you are best off purchasing a computer that you can get some longevity out of, and one that you'll enjoy using. Will you be using the machine at home (music, movies, photos, etc.) or only at school for the ortho software?

    If you favor Windows, get a Windows box. If you like Macs (or are thinking of switching), then get a Mac. If you need to run a Windows-only program, then use the Mac's Boot Camp software to install Windows on a small partition. Run your ortho software from that, and when your ortho program is finished delete the Windows partition (or keep it if you like). If that's the route you choose to go then it's very simple. The only caveat is that you must purchase a copy of Windows from Microsoft. The Windows partition of the hard drive runs Windows, and the Mac partition runs OS X. You can't delete the OS X partition, but you can delete or change the partition size of the Windows partition at any time.
     
  6. Dr Who

    Dr Who Future MD...

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    You might consider getting a mac and installing windows using boot camp. I bought an Imac recently and let me tell you I have NEVER used a mac before. I installed windows vista using bootcamp and it runs beautifully. I also installed a program called macdrive, which basically lets me acces both partitions when I am in either operating systems. So lets say I am using windows and I need a certain file in my mac osx partition, I simply hit the start button then computer and have acces to the other partition as if it was another hard drive. I can copy- paste, drag and drop any file between operating systems or play media files located in one partition using the operating system on the other.

    You also have other options. You can use a program called Parallels which lets you run both mac osx AND windows Simultaneaously. The program also has a cool feature called coherence that permits any windows programs to open in a mac as if it were running on windows. Do a search on wikipedia on both boot camp and parallels so you can have a better idea.

    For the best bang for the buck I'd go for a mackbook. Better yet, get yourself a macbook pro. :thumbup:
     
  7. BlueToothHunter

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    Mac's are great computers (I use Powerbook 12"). But in the orthodontic industry, it's not that well supported. Two companies provide software for orthodontic purpose:

    1. Quickceph - A ceph tracing software; you can do VTO and growth prediction etc. Very beautifully done. Student/resident price $3000.

    2. TopsXtreme - A Mac software for patient management

    Most orthodontic residency run on PC environment. Dolphin is the major ceph tracing software which is donated to the educational institution with free upgrades for the residents/students during the residency. But you will need to buy your own software license upon your graduation. With the advent of CBCT and 3D imaging, Dolphin is way ahead of the game than Quickceph at the moment. If you want a laptop computer solely for the educational use, then I would go for vista run PC laptop. If you want something for home use and a little bit of work, then Macbooks should be fine. but then again, it's all dependant on WHAT you are looking for?
     
  8. dds854

    dds854 New Member

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    thanks for the replies!
     
  9. Wayne Coronado

    Wayne Coronado Edentulistic Savant

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    I own a macbook pro and have used both boot camp and parallels. I ran boot camp first when I bought my laptop and it was awesome (for the first few months). If you like gaming or anything that pushes your graphics card, boot camp is the way to go. However, I have to say that I did run into problems after a few months or so. I'm not exactly sure what happened internally, but my windows partition just stopped working. I tried re-installing it, but it kept giving me problems so I abandoned boot camp for parallels. Parallels also seemed to be a winner in the beginning (although you lose the use of your graphics card and isight in windows) and I really enjoyed being able to seamlessly switch between OSX and windows (as opposed to boot camp which requires you to reboot). Once again, a few months later, I had some problems that at first were just a nuisance (mainly freezing up). Then one day, when I tried to startup my mac, I got the main gray screen then some kind of question mark on a folder in the middle of the screen. I found out later through diagnostics that my hard drive had failed and luckily for me, I have the protection plan that covered replacement of the hard drive. I am not positive that boot camp or parallels was the culprit, but my problems with the mac occurred only after installing these products. Before investing in these products, I would certainly take a look at some consumer reviews and get an idea about the possible issues you may face. Here's a link for some parallels reviews:

    http://store.apple.com/1-800-MY-APPLE/WebObjects/AppleStore.woa/wa/RSLID?mco=6C04E07A&nplm=TK057LL/A#rev

    Once again, I'm not saying these are bogus products. When they worked, they worked great. I just wanted to share my take and that other people have experienced similar issues.
     

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