Squiggy

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I was just wondering, do adcoms view all academic majors in the same light? They must compensate for the difficulty of really hard majors like engineering and vice versa for easier majors.

Let's say that an applicant has taken all the prerequisites and has a sGPA of 3.6 and MCAT scores in the mid-30's from a top tier school.

If the applicant's overall GPA was a 3.5, how would it look to adcoms if he was an engineering major, an econ major, a history major, an education major, a psych major, and sociology/comm major?

If a bio major had an overall GPA of 3.5, how would it be adjusted by adcoms if he was one of the other majors I mentioned and by how great a magnitude (how many 1/10 of a point) would it be adjusted?

My bachelors is neither in a science nor engineering and I'm concerned that it may be viewed as a weakness.
 
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Squiggy

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They really don't care? Well that's a relief. There must be some GPA adjustment for those majors though. What about engineering majors?
 

RySerr21

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I realize that there's a lot of discussion on this topic but what I haven't discovered is to what magnitude the major affects GPA. A communications or sociology major couldn't possibly have their GPA given the same weight as a Bio/Chem major could they?


If you do well on the pre reqs and your MCAT, no one is going to care that your major is considered "easy."
 

Excelsius

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They really don't care? Well that's a relief. There must be some GPA adjustment for those majors though. What about engineering majors?
Your major doesn't matter. The only thing you need to know is that if you didn't do well in your science classes, then it would serve you well to take additional science classes to prove that you can do it. Major is just a word. It's the classes you take that matter. The average science GPA for all matriculants is 3.60 (3.64 for whites). So if you think you want to be higher than average, then take more science courses and get As. Your major is of no consequence.

FYI, engineering classes are not considered BCPM by AMCAS, so they don't count for your science GPA.
 

TexasPhysician

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fizzle

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My interviewer earlier this week noted my engineering major and liked it. There's probably no quantitative measurement of how positively the adcoms see it, but they do notice, especially at the subjective stages (i.e. interviews and beyond). Of course, it also helps that I had a strong reason for going into engineering, too.
 

rjf

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I have to agree with fizzle. I have had three interviewers make a comment about my major. In my humble opinion, some majors are more appealing than others.
 

satsuma

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hi, i'm a senior med student and i've been a part of admissions. your major itself doesn't matter much -- but do well in it. if you love it, all the better, display that somehow in your application. your science gpa and overall gpa are very important.

however, if your major is non-science then the science gpa and mcat is the only indicators that we have for whether or not you can handle the tough 100% science workload of med school. a strong application can include any major. it's just one component of the overall picture...

good luck.
 

Squiggy

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Wow thank you all for these responses! It's good to know I haven't shot myself in the foot.
 
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njbmd

Majors do not matter. Your best strategy is to major in something that you like and can perform well in. You don't get any "points" for attempting to study Engineering/Physics or any other perceived "difficult" major subject. If you hate science, take the premedical sciences (all except Organic Chemistry are freshman-level) and do well but major in a non-science subject.

The truth of the matter is that the best preparation for medical school is any subject that will provide you with a solid grounding/practice in problem-solving and efficient assimilation of large amounts of information. The more facile you are in terms of study, the better you will perform in medical school.

With that being said, you need a very strong performance in your undergraduate studies and thus, major in something that you enjoy. You are more likely to perform at a higher level than when you attempt to "impress" others with something that you don't enjoy.

At our institutions, your application will not get to the admissions committee members if you don't make the first cut (which is based on uGPA/MCAT performance). You have one shot at not "screwing up" this process.
 
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