premedrod

youtube ruined my apps
10+ Year Member
Oct 29, 2007
184
0
Status
Pre-Medical
I was wondering if its viewed better that a applicant is a humanities major and gets a >3.5 on their BCMP or a science major that gets about 3.3 for their BCMP.....Thinking about the classes that are required for med school, they aren't that hard and I think my gpa would've been over 3.5, but majoring in biochem kind of sucks with all the additional upper divisional classes....

just wondering what people came across...
 

ChubbyChaser

Yummmy
10+ Year Member
Apr 14, 2007
13,168
5
Status
Medical Student
I was wondering if its viewed better that a applicant is a humanities major and gets a >3.5 on their BCMP or a science major that gets about 3.3 for their BCMP.....Thinking about the classes that are required for med school, they aren't that hard and I think my gpa would've been over 3.5, but majoring in biochem kind of sucks with all the additional upper divisional classes....

just wondering what people came across...
Ummm Humanities....

But chances are if you dont like history, english, or whatever...You want have a superb GPA in it. Major in what you find interesting.

*nvm just realized you already graduated....

So why does it matter?
 
OP
P

premedrod

youtube ruined my apps
10+ Year Member
Oct 29, 2007
184
0
Status
Pre-Medical
eh, its just lame that some ppl major in easier fields haha
yah i'm complainin hahaha

btw, im about to graduate (fifth year brah)
 

Perrotfish

Has an MD in Horribleness
10+ Year Member
May 26, 2007
8,016
3,925
Status
Attending Physician
Meh, I consider it a tradeoff. The humanities people get the ´fun´classes and higher GPAs. The science majors get real jobs if they don´t get into medical school but hurt their chances at the dream job. Engineering majors even more so. It´s the difference between playing the stock market and putting your money into government bonds. More risk for more reward.
 

1956Goldtop

Guest
10+ Year Member
Jan 11, 2008
1,036
1
Status
Pre-Medical
You sure those humanities people get it easier? I don't know about you, but I'd much rather memorize all the amino acids, cellular respiration, hundreds of mechanisms, molecular techniques etc., than have to write an intelligent paper on Kierkegaardian Philosophy.
 

ChubbyChaser

Yummmy
10+ Year Member
Apr 14, 2007
13,168
5
Status
Medical Student
You sure those humanities people get it easier? I don't know about you, but I'd much rather memorize all the amino acids, cellular respiration, hundreds of mechanisms, molecular techniques etc., than have to write an intelligent paper on Kierkegaardian Philosophy.
thats why you major in business or communication....are those considered humanities?:confused:
 

1956Goldtop

Guest
10+ Year Member
Jan 11, 2008
1,036
1
Status
Pre-Medical
No in general I think Humanities includes: philosophy, english, history, etc.

I'm not a humanities major, but a liberal arts major of the mere mortal persuasion.
 

LandSpeed

Can you dig it?
10+ Year Member
Oct 28, 2007
62
0
Northern California
Status
Pre-Medical
yeah, just be glad you weren't a humanities major, because now you'd be working at mcdonalds. Is it just me or does everyone else know a ton of non-science grads that are homeless? :laugh:
 

evandavidson

10+ Year Member
May 15, 2007
55
0
Status
It depends. With the exception of a highly specialized engineering jobs, many jobs are open to all majors. I was Poli Sci with an Accounting minor, and I had no problem finding a good (and high paying) job post-undergrad. If you are an intelligent, capable person who got good grades and has the capacity to learn and work, you will do fine, regardless of major.
 

Wylde

10+ Year Member
7+ Year Member
Sep 23, 2007
693
1
Status
Pre-Medical
yeah, just be glad you weren't a humanities major, because now you'd be working at mcdonalds. Is it just me or does everyone else know a ton of non-science grads that are homeless? :laugh:
BS/BA = the new HS Diploma.

EVERYONE is getting a college degree, it is worth as much as a Frenchmen in a war.
 

brianmartin

10+ Year Member
Nov 12, 2006
1,024
28
Status
Attending Physician
The science majors get real jobs if they don´t get into medical school but hurt their chances at the dream job.
How does being a science major hurt your chances of med school acceptance? They're accepted at the same rate as non-science majors.
 

ZagDoc

Ears, Noses, and Throats
10+ Year Member
Jul 12, 2007
1,411
24
Status
Resident [Any Field]
I still maintain double majoring in philosophy along with my biology degree helped me get into medical school. Every single one of my interviewers was eager to pick my brain about why I chose philosophy.

And yeah, it didn't help my GPA. Some of those upper division philosophy professors, man I tell ya, you could be to second coming of Sartre and they'd still give you a B.
 

brianmartin

10+ Year Member
Nov 12, 2006
1,024
28
Status
Attending Physician
However there is some degree of OVER-education in a humanities type major, and not all people are suited to it. That's why medical schools accept both science and non-science majors in proportion :)
 

ChubbyChaser

Yummmy
10+ Year Member
Apr 14, 2007
13,168
5
Status
Medical Student
BS/BA = the new HS Diploma.

EVERYONE is getting a college degree, it is worth as much as a Frenchmen in a war.

In napoleon days...Or the world wars?
 

Ella Shepherd

Screen. Stage. Studio.
10+ Year Member
Nov 5, 2007
407
0
Status
Pre-Medical
thats why you major in business or communication....are those considered humanities?:confused:
Communication is, but business as it is isn't. Some degree programs under humanities are Mass Communication, Literature, Communication and Media Studies, Film and Audio-Visual Communication, English, etc...
 

njbmd

Guest
Moderator Emeritus
5+ Year Member
15+ Year Member
May 30, 2001
9,050
145
Gone Walkabout!
Visit site
Status
Attending Physician
I was wondering if its viewed better that a applicant is a humanities major and gets a >3.5 on their BCMP or a science major that gets about 3.3 for their BCMP.....Thinking about the classes that are required for med school, they aren't that hard and I think my gpa would've been over 3.5, but majoring in biochem kind of sucks with all the additional upper divisional classes....

just wondering what people came across...
Major in what you love and can perform in best. There are no extra points for having certain majors. Your overall performance is going to get you in or keep you out. If I am sitting there looking at a person who majored in English with an overall uGPA of 3.90 and an Engineering major with a 3.5 with equal science GPAs, the English major gets the acceptance.

We, on admissions committees assume that you study coursework that is of interest to you personally. If you are interested in something, your performance should be excellent. If you are just choosing a major because you believe the major itself is impressive, you are going to likely end up on the losing end GPA-wise.

More people with science majors gain acceptance to medical school because more science majors apply period. A solid uGPA beats a mediocre performance no matter what the major. Major in the subject that you can show academic excellence.
 

Ashers

Bacteria? Don't exist.
10+ Year Member
Apr 5, 2006
5,257
13
Land of Entrapment
Status
Attending Physician
BS/BA = the new HS Diploma.

EVERYONE is getting a college degree, it is worth as much as a Frenchmen in a war.
In napoleon days...Or the world wars?
Have you guys gone to Google and googled "French military victories" then hit "I'm Feeling Lucky"? entertaining.

Anyway, there doesn't seem to be much you can do with just a BA/BS degree. My brother worked at Starbucks after getting an English degree. Biology seems pretty useless as just a BS. Maybe language BAs would be worth more.

I majored in Biology, since I was interested in it, and I minored in other stuff in which I was interested.
 

ayushman80

10+ Year Member
7+ Year Member
Dec 8, 2007
294
2
Status
Medical Student
I think as far as admissions goes its not a big deal wheather you are since or not. As long as your GPA (science and non science) are good anyone should be okay. Plus the MCAT is the great equalizer as far as baseline knowledge for med school.

I think though that non science majors have a big disadvantage once they get in. Since majors, especially bio/biochem/molec bio, get to take a lot of classes that repeat in med school. They may be at a more indepth level or even a lesser level (some 400, 500 level classes) than taught in med school. Being introduced to the material before you take the official classes makes it a lot easier to study IMO. My sister was a science major and she told me that many non science majors struggle with the shear volume of material. The main problem is that they weren't introduced to stuff like biochem while in college.

There will alwyas be the exceptions who are able to grasp the materials easily. These people will do well regardless of their major. But I think that for the average med school student: science major => science background=> better background for med school => better performance in med school classes => higher class ranking => higher board scores => better residency.

One thing to be said is that a quantum physics major would probably be in the same shoes as a political science major:)
 

ADeadLois

Senior Member
10+ Year Member
Dec 18, 2005
3,158
6
Status
Medical Student
I think though that non science majors have a big disadvantage once they get in. Since majors, especially bio/biochem/molec bio, get to take a lot of classes that repeat in med school. They may be at a more indepth level or even a lesser level (some 400, 500 level classes) than taught in med school. Being introduced to the material before you take the official classes makes it a lot easier to study IMO. My sister was a science major and she told me that many non science majors struggle with the shear volume of material. The main problem is that they weren't introduced to stuff like biochem while in college.
Not true at all. First, very little of what you learn in undergrad repeats in med school. In fact, of the material I've learned in 1st year, maybe 5% I'd seen before...and I was a science major. And most of that was covered in the first lecture of each class and was barely emphasized on exams.

Honestly, what's challenging about med school isn't the difficulty of the material, it's the volume. Those who are the most successful are those who have the best time management skills. Those are struggle are those who don't. It's not a matter of science background.
 
OP
P

premedrod

youtube ruined my apps
10+ Year Member
Oct 29, 2007
184
0
Status
Pre-Medical
Not true at all. First, very little of what you learn in undergrad repeats in med school. In fact, of the material I've learned in 1st year, maybe 5% I'd seen before...and I was a science major. And most of that was covered in the first lecture of each class and was barely emphasized on exams.

Honestly, what's challenging about med school isn't the difficulty of the material, it's the volume. Those who are the most successful are those who have the best time management skills. Those are struggle are those who don't. It's not a matter of science background.
this is some good advice. ill keep it in mind.

BS/BA = the new HS Diploma.

EVERYONE is getting a college degree, it is worth as much as a Frenchmen in a war.
TRUE DAT...i swear, i cant do much with my biochem degree...probably be an ASSISTANT scientist at a biotech company or be a high school science teacher.....boooooooo
 

PrettyLadyDoc

10+ Year Member
Mar 1, 2007
23
0
Status
Pre-Medical
The best way to beat that "Humanities Major" med-school overload is to take a good 17-18 hour courseload in undergrad. I'm a Psych major (borderline humanities) but the fact that I put in 18 credits every semester? No one will question that I can study :)
 

surfstarj

10+ Year Member
Jul 23, 2007
558
2
Status
Medical Student
But I think that for the average med school student: science major => science background=> better background for med school => better performance in med school classes => higher class ranking => higher board scores => better residency.
Dude, no. Being a science major doesn't blaze a direct trail past all those peon non-science majors right to awesome medical success like this.

You're also omitting a major concept here: humanity-type premeds aren't your typical humanities students. They take science. At the bare minimum they take the prereqs. Most take science classes beyond the minimum. Majors basically mean nothing: ability to see new material, digest it and synthesize a way of dealing with it and relating pieces to a whole is what matters. Subject is irrelevant, process is paramount.
 

brownie9

10+ Year Member
May 14, 2008
4
0
Status
Medical Student
Philosophy majors have a near 50%+ acceptance rate to medical school.

Your a philosophy major? Flip a coin...heads your in medical school...tails your not.

Your a science major? Well you have now a ~35% chance.
 

andythegolfman

10+ Year Member
May 14, 2008
28
0
Status
Philosophy majors have a near 50%+ acceptance rate to medical school.

Your a philosophy major? Flip a coin...heads your in medical school...tails your not.

Your a science major? Well you have now a ~35% chance.
really? can you back this up with some data or are you just pontificating? also, keep in mind that this may just be because people that major in philosophy tend to be naturally very smart so you can guarantee that the pre-med phil majors will generally succeed, whereas the bio major doesn't select for such an elite group of bright overachievers like phil
 

ZagDoc

Ears, Noses, and Throats
10+ Year Member
Jul 12, 2007
1,411
24
Status
Resident [Any Field]
Philosophy majors have a near 50%+ acceptance rate to medical school.

Your a philosophy major? Flip a coin...heads your in medical school...tails your not.
Haha might want to work on your inductive reasoning.

I will say that us philosophy majors are a rare breed at my school. Whether that means that's because pre-med philosophy majors are a rare breed or we have the same acceptance rate as all the other poor schmucks, I can't say.

I will say one thing though. Pre-meds are always looking for those tiny perceived advantages on helping them get into medical school. But 4 years slaving towards a degree that doesn't excite you will actually hurt you in the applicantion process. Interviewers want to see people excited about learning and loving what they learn. The pre-reqs are there to ensure everyone is on equal ground as far as what they need to know coming into medical school but I don't think my biology degree afforded me any advantages in medical school besides letting me slack off a couple days a month if the material was a little more familiar. Ultimately, by the time the exam rolls around everyone knows the stuff cold anyways, whether they came in as a pottery major or a double biochem neuroscience major.