Hoody

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So someone recently mentioned in this forum that nursing is looked down upon in the eyes of the adcoms for several reasons. One of the biggest reasons being that nurses are in a shortage so they really don't want to pull people form that field.....

I am curious as to how true this is. How much do adoms look down on nursing as undergraduate degree? :confused:

All along I was sorta thinking that it gave me a leg up because it has allowed me to be in the clinical setting far more than your average medical applicant giving me first hand exposure and expereince.
 

Disinence2

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It depends on your situation. I think the point here is that nursing school as a path to medical school is a bad idea. If you know you want to be an MD then its ok to get your CNA, EMT, PCT, certifications to get experience, but don't go to nursing school for 3 years just to apply to med school directly after. I've talked to a few nursing students who tell me they plan on applying to medical school when they graduate, and although they are gaining some valuable experience, its also a bit of a drain on the system.

If your a practicing nurse, and change your mind and apply to medical school with a good background then schools will love you.

I used to think that some schools preferred certain majors or didn't like others, but that's really not true. It gives them some context to look at your GPA if its mediocre (Engineering vs psych).Really its all about your grades and your experiences.
 
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Hoody

Hoody

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If your a practicing nurse, and change your mind and apply to medical school with a good background then schools will love you.
This is me, already praciting, post grad year 2ish.

Thanks for your response. :thumbup:
 

njbmd

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There are no "preferred" and "non-preferred" majors. You can major in anything that you love and that you can do well. The only thing with nursing, pharm, med tech and other allied health professions is that you are going to be asked why you want to practice medicine rather than "X". If you have a well-though-out answer to this question (actually same as any other major), a competitive application(with good grades in the pre-med courses),then you are fine.