NYMC MD 2B

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Hey all! I just wanted to offer some advice. Before you submit those applications, make sure you really are positive about becoming a doctor. The whole application process is brutal (I know, I just completed it), but don't be fooled into thinking once you are accepted, you are a "doctor." Medical school is a long, difficult road, with many sacrifices and few rewards (at least initially). I have not even had my first lecture yet, and I already have a reading assignment. My classes run 9 to 5 essentially every day, and we are expected to put in at least 4 or 5 hours of independent studying every weekday, and one full weekend day every week. Basically, you will be up every morning at the crack of dawn, in class until dinnertime, and studying until 9 or 10 every night. Now, if you are sure about your career choice, it is a wonderful, exciting thing to be a part of. But if you think that you will have any free time, or that "getting in" is the hardest part, think again.
 

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NYMC MD 2B said:
Hey all! I just wanted to offer some advice. Before you submit those applications, make sure you really are positive about becoming a doctor. The whole application process is brutal (I know, I just completed it), but don't be fooled into thinking once you are accepted, you are a "doctor." Medical school is a long, difficult road, with many sacrifices and few rewards (at least initially). I have not even had my first lecture yet, and I already have a reading assignment. My classes run 9 to 5 essentially every day, and we are expected to put in at least 4 or 5 hours of independent studying every weekday, and one full weekend day every week. Basically, you will be up every morning at the crack of dawn, in class until dinnertime, and studying until 9 or 10 every night. Now, if you are sure about your career choice, it is a wonderful, exciting thing to be a part of. But if you think that you will have any free time, or that "getting in" is the hardest part, think again.
Why don't you just skip lecture?
 

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bbas said:
Why don't you just skip lecture?
Or not attend such a ****ty medical school. Where are you going? The University of Hell?
 
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baylormed

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Let's not elevate the medical profession to mythical levels. Of course you should be sure you like it, of course it will be hard work, and of course you will have to study a lot.
But so is everything else in life. Whether you choose to go to Law School, get a PhD, be a teacher, a nurse, etc, there are rewards and sacrifices, there are long work hours, etc.

However, you are right in saying you should be sure this is what you want to do before you go into it. :)
 

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Too much drama in this post. I'm in the same boat as Baylormed.



NYMC MD 2B said:
Hey all! I just wanted to offer some advice. Before you submit those applications, make sure you really are positive about becoming a doctor. The whole application process is brutal (I know, I just completed it), but don't be fooled into thinking once you are accepted, you are a "doctor." Medical school is a long, difficult road, with many sacrifices and few rewards (at least initially). I have not even had my first lecture yet, and I already have a reading assignment. My classes run 9 to 5 essentially every day, and we are expected to put in at least 4 or 5 hours of independent studying every weekday, and one full weekend day every week. Basically, you will be up every morning at the crack of dawn, in class until dinnertime, and studying until 9 or 10 every night. Now, if you are sure about your career choice, it is a wonderful, exciting thing to be a part of. But if you think that you will have any free time, or that "getting in" is the hardest part, think again.
 

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NYMC MD 2B said:
Basically, you will be up every morning at the crack of dawn, in class until dinnertime, and studying until 9 or 10 every night....But if you think that you will have any free time, or that "getting in" is the hardest part, think again.
I'm ~2 months into my 3rd year and this isn't true. Med school is work, probably a bit heavier load than ugrad, but its rewarding and focused work with clear goals and milestones. And you will have time for outside activities and a social life...1st 2-3months of 1st year I was socializing and drinking even more than undergrad until sanity prevailed and we decided we were approaching "too old for this sh!t" and backed off (a bit). Whatsmore, the workload described above only really applies to the 1-2weeks before exam blocks.

Point is medical school is fun and rewarding...I never understood the whole medical school martyr complex people seem to have. anyway, good luck with apps.

[/perspective]
 

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baylormed said:
Let's not elevate the medical profession to mythical levels. Of course you should be sure you like it, of course it will be hard work, and of course you will have to study a lot.
But so is everything else in life. Whether you choose to go to Law School, get a PhD, be a teacher, a nurse, etc, there are rewards and sacrifices, there are long work hours, etc.

However, you are right in saying you should be sure this is what you want to do before you go into it. :)
Mythical levels? I don't think the OP is painting an unreasonable picture of the study of medicine. Everyone studies differently, and there are different requirements everywhere, but yes, you will spend a decent amount of time studying, a large amount of time stressing, and a lot of time awake when you should be sleeping. There will be a lot of people who tell you that you don't have to study much and take every weekend off, but there are just as many that study even more, and yes, there are people who fail.

I think more people should know just how hard a road its going to be. After the preclinical years, although, the experiences are widely variable, hours can be long, the pressure is difficult, and there are rotations which will make you question your desire to pursue medicine. Then there is residency, and junior attending, and so on. For most, from the first day of medical school to practice is at least 7 years, for many, its at least 10, and for more, its even more. Most will be in their thirties, at LEAST, if not older, before begining to practice. Its true most people make it through, but there are people who choose to pursue other lives at every level, and even more that wish they did, but can't because they think its "too late".

Will my significant other and I love our work in medicine? Yes. If my little sister told me she was interested in medicine, I would tell her there's no chance in hell I'd let that happen.

sscooterguy
 

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sscooterguy said:
Will my significant other and I love our work in medicine? Yes. If my little sister told me she was interested in medicine, I would tell her there's no chance in hell I'd let that happen.
If you love your work, why wouldn't you let it happen? Just wondering.
 

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NYMC MD 2B said:
Hey all! I just wanted to offer some advice. Before you submit those applications, make sure you really are positive about becoming a doctor. The whole application process is brutal (I know, I just completed it), but don't be fooled into thinking once you are accepted, you are a "doctor." Medical school is a long, difficult road, with many sacrifices and few rewards (at least initially). I have not even had my first lecture yet, and I already have a reading assignment. My classes run 9 to 5 essentially every day, and we are expected to put in at least 4 or 5 hours of independent studying every weekday, and one full weekend day every week. Basically, you will be up every morning at the crack of dawn, in class until dinnertime, and studying until 9 or 10 every night. Now, if you are sure about your career choice, it is a wonderful, exciting thing to be a part of. But if you think that you will have any free time, or that "getting in" is the hardest part, think again.
.....grain of salt
 

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bbas said:
If you love your work, why wouldn't you let it happen? Just wondering.
I know, it sounds contradictory, and maybe it is. I love my work. I cannot see myself doing any other profession. However, at the same time, my view of medicine and goals have also changed since undergrad.

Everyone of my friends who have families tell me all they want to do is go home and spend time with their family and kids. I am interested in a very time consuming and competative field, Orthopaedics, but at the same time, I don't want to have to explain to little sscooterkid that dad can't make it to your soccer game because he made this decision to follow this dream before you were born.

Its a long hard road, and I wouldn't want that for my little sister. Sure you have to enjoy the journey, find a balance, etc, but its still a long hard road nonetheless.

sscooterguy
 

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sscooterguy said:
I know, it sounds contradictory, and maybe it is. I love my work. I cannot see myself doing any other profession. However, at the same time, my view of medicine and goals have also changed since undergrad.

Everyone of my friends who have families tell me all they want to do is go home and spend time with their family and kids. I am interested in a very time consuming and competative field, Orthopaedics, but at the same time, I don't want to have to explain to little sscooterkid that dad can't make it to your soccer game because he made this decision to follow this dream before you were born.

Its a long hard road, and I wouldn't want that for my little sister. Sure you have to enjoy the journey, find a balance, etc, but its still a long hard road nonetheless.

sscooterguy
that makes no sense
 
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So, your sister requires your permission before deciding on a career? What are you going to do if she decides to go into medicine, replace her contact solution with acid?
 

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So, your sister requires your permission before deciding on a career? What are you going to do if she decides to go into medicine, replace her contact solution with acid?
:laugh: :laugh:
 
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sscooterguy said:
I know, it sounds contradictory, and maybe it is. I love my work. I cannot see myself doing any other profession. However, at the same time, my view of medicine and goals have also changed since undergrad.

Everyone of my friends who have families tell me all they want to do is go home and spend time with their family and kids. I am interested in a very time consuming and competative field, Orthopaedics, but at the same time, I don't want to have to explain to little sscooterkid that dad can't make it to your soccer game because he made this decision to follow this dream before you were born.

Its a long hard road, and I wouldn't want that for my little sister. Sure you have to enjoy the journey, find a balance, etc, but its still a long hard road nonetheless.

sscooterguy

give me an f'n break. Contradictory? um no - you're a hypocrite.
 

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Man, go home. Quit with the negative vibe crap. I really get annoyed with people like you. "I'd never go back and do it again"-type attitude sucks. Quit being a thorn in our side and why don't you try to cheer us up during this application process. By the way, you reason for not letting your sister go in makes you sound like a control freak. You have a position of "nobility" as a med student/soon-to-be-doctor, and you don't think anyone else should have that.

GO HOME!!!
 

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NYMC MD 2B said:
Hey all! I just wanted to offer some advice. Before you submit those applications, make sure you really are positive about becoming a doctor. The whole application process is brutal (I know, I just completed it), but don't be fooled into thinking once you are accepted, you are a "doctor." Medical school is a long, difficult road, with many sacrifices and few rewards (at least initially). I have not even had my first lecture yet, and I already have a reading assignment. My classes run 9 to 5 essentially every day, and we are expected to put in at least 4 or 5 hours of independent studying every weekday, and one full weekend day every week. Basically, you will be up every morning at the crack of dawn, in class until dinnertime, and studying until 9 or 10 every night. Now, if you are sure about your career choice, it is a wonderful, exciting thing to be a part of. But if you think that you will have any free time, or that "getting in" is the hardest part, think again.
nobody is 100% sure and med school's not that scary... :scared: you gotta live...i'd rather fail than bail out on everything that looks hard and makes me nervous.
 

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BozoSparky said:
nobody is 100% sure and med school's not that scary... :scared: you gotta live...i'd rather fail than bail out on everything that looks hard and makes me nervous.
yeah i think some people are dramatizing the whole med school rest of your life thing

you have the rest of your life to work...why not start a tad later and do what you really want to do?
 

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NYMC MD 2B said:
Hey all! I just wanted to offer some advice. Before you submit those applications, make sure you really are positive about becoming a doctor. The whole application process is brutal (I know, I just completed it), but don't be fooled into thinking once you are accepted, you are a "doctor." Medical school is a long, difficult road, with many sacrifices and few rewards (at least initially). I have not even had my first lecture yet, and I already have a reading assignment. My classes run 9 to 5 essentially every day, and we are expected to put in at least 4 or 5 hours of independent studying every weekday, and one full weekend day every week. Basically, you will be up every morning at the crack of dawn, in class until dinnertime, and studying until 9 or 10 every night. Now, if you are sure about your career choice, it is a wonderful, exciting thing to be a part of. But if you think that you will have any free time, or that "getting in" is the hardest part, think again.
I agree with baylor, chill out with the gloom. There is a more useful way to say your message. Everyone is different, some people put in 1/4 the time of others and get just as much out if it, also schools are different as far as expectations and curriculum. After you are actually in class for a week or two or maybe a month then you can tell us if you personally needed those 100+ hours a week or whatever it is for independent studying. I agree with the message that the road is long and difficult, but then again so is life.
 

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I think scooterguy just sees med school as the abusive boyfriend his sister needs to stay far away from :D
 

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taylormade44 said:
that makes no sense
Why not? I think he brings up a good point actually. Of coure we're all pumped up about medicine now, but people's priorities do change once they have a family and kids. Right now, being in our early 20's, our career is the main concern for many of us but that often changes once we get older.
 

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now, i can understand using the "i dont want her to make the same mistakes i made" line for things like od-ing on drugs, getting caught with transvestite hookers, investing in dog currency, etc.... but trying to be a doctor? come on
 

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I have talked to a lot of people and while I certainly don't think medical school will be easy, in some ways it will be easier for me than undergrad. Right now I am working full time, taking a lot of classes, volunteering, etc. During medical school, I'll be taking a lot of classes, and that's it lol. Plus when you factor in that a lot of the time you don't have to go to class, you can read transcripts and study on your own, really it may not be so bad.

A lot of this will depend on what school you go to. If you go to a crazy school that requires attendence to every lecture and doesn't have or allow some type of transcription service, then yeah you might be working as much as the OP suggests. So pick the schools you apply too wisely is I guess the moral of the story.
 
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bbas said:
Why not? I think he brings up a good point actually. Of coure we're all pumped up about medicine now, but people's priorities do change once they have a family and kids. Right now, being in our early 20's, our career is the main concern for many of us but that often changes once we get older.
it makes no sense because he justified the fact that he wouldnt let his little sister go into medicine because its a long and hard journey where some people "enjoy the journey" - but he wouldnt give his sister a chance to try and/or enjoy it?
 

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bbas said:
Why not? I think he brings up a good point actually. Of coure we're all pumped up about medicine now, but people's priorities do change once they have a family and kids. Right now, being in our early 20's, our career is the main concern for many of us but that often changes once we get older.
I hate to state the obvious here but a lot of people have a family and kids and still want to go into medicine. Additionally, a lot of people who are not in their early 20's want to go to medical school. Age and kids don't exclude the idea of one wanting to go into medicine. I too hate the moral superiority complex that some people have when they get to med-school or become docs. The best line ever is when docs say if I could do it again I wouldn't go into medicine. THEN WHY DON'T YOU QUIT THE F--KING PROFESSION AND GO DO SOMETHING THAT MAKES YOU HAPPY. I had a cousin who was a doc, and he said he didn't like it. Instead of bitching about it to everyone for the rest of his life and making himself sound like some kind of hero for enduring a profession that he didn't like he kept his mouth shut, slowly exited medicine, and attained an MBA. If people don't like what they have to live with they should do something about it instead of discouraging everyone else from making what they perceive to be a mistake. It sounds like they are the ones who didn't have a realistic idea of what they were getting themselves into. In case docs and med-students haven't noticed getting into med-school is quite hard and I would say 90% of the people who apply and get in, have done as much as they possibly can to try an understand exactly what they are getting themselves into. Obviously no one will ever know what it's like to be a doc until they become a doc but most people have a pretty good idea of what they are getting themselves into. How would NYMC MD respond to a doctor who got on here and complained about being a doctor and said "quit med-school before you start, you have no idea what you are getting yourself into". "I'd never let my children become doctors, even though I will remain one." What a bunch of bulls--t. NYMC MD would probably think it was BS too, kind of like when someone who hasn't even spent a single day in medical school says "Medical school is a long, difficult road, with many sacrifices and few rewards (at least initially)". I didn't check NYMC's background but I hope I didn't just bite on TROLL BAIT :eek:
 

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taylormade44 said:
it makes no sense because he justified the fact that he wouldnt let his little sister go into medicine because its a long and hard journey where some people "enjoy the journey" - but he wouldnt give his sister a chance to try and/or enjoy it?
Ah, ok.
 

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sscooterguy said:
you will spend a decent amount of time studying, a large amount of time stressing, and a lot of time awake when you should be sleeping. There will be a lot of people who tell you that you don't have to study much and take every weekend off, but there are just as many that study even more, and yes, there are people who fail.
sscooterguy
How is this different from undergraduate school, taking the MCAT, or going through an application process to medical school :confused:
 

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NYMC MD 2B said:
Hey all! I just wanted to offer some advice. Before you submit those applications, make sure you really are positive about becoming a doctor. The whole application process is brutal (I know, I just completed it), but don't be fooled into thinking once you are accepted, you are a "doctor." Medical school is a long, difficult road, with many sacrifices and few rewards (at least initially). I have not even had my first lecture yet, and I already have a reading assignment. My classes run 9 to 5 essentially every day, and we are expected to put in at least 4 or 5 hours of independent studying every weekday, and one full weekend day every week. Basically, you will be up every morning at the crack of dawn, in class until dinnertime, and studying until 9 or 10 every night. Now, if you are sure about your career choice, it is a wonderful, exciting thing to be a part of. But if you think that you will have any free time, or that "getting in" is the hardest part, think again.
4 hours a day and a weekend day?
how's that different from college?
 

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breck said:
I hate to state the obvious here but a lot of people have a family and kids and still want to go into medicine. Additionally, a lot of people who are not in their early 20's want to go to medical school. Age and kids don't exclude the idea of one wanting to go into medicine. I too hate the moral superiority complex that some people have when they get to med-school or become docs. The best line ever is when docs say if I could do it again I wouldn't go into medicine. THEN WHY DON'T YOU QUIT THE F--KING PROFESSION AND GO DO SOMETHING THAT MAKES YOU HAPPY. I had a cousin who was a doc, and he said he didn't like it. Instead of bitching about it to everyone for the rest of his life and making himself sound like some kind of hero for enduring a profession that he didn't like he kept his mouth shut, slowly exited medicine, and attained an MBA. If people don't like what they have to live with they should do something about it instead of discouraging everyone else from making what they perceive to be a mistake. It sounds like they are the ones who didn't have a realistic idea of what they were getting themselves into. In case docs and med-students haven't noticed getting into med-school is quite hard and I would say 90% of the people who apply and get in, have done as much as they possibly can to try an understand exactly what they are getting themselves into. Obviously no one will ever know what it's like to be a doc until they become a doc but most people have a pretty good idea of what they are getting themselves into. How would NYMC MD respond to a doctor who got on here and complained about being a doctor and said "quit med-school before you start, you have no idea what you are getting yourself into". "I'd never let my children become doctors, even though I will remain one." What a bunch of bulls--t. NYMC MD would probably think it was BS too, kind of like when someone who hasn't even spent a single day in medical school says "Medical school is a long, difficult road, with many sacrifices and few rewards (at least initially)". I didn't check NYMC's background but I hope I didn't just bite on TROLL BAIT :eek:
Here, here!!!
 

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To the original "pessimistic" posters... welcome to the real world.

I think many of us who are health prof advisors have been saying what you have posted for quite a while. It's just a question of how receptive you were to our advice.

That's part of the reason why the admissions committees demand so much from you from your personal statement and during the interviews. It's great that you got in, but remember that you will grow up in medical school. Don't be afraid of that.

You also should note... you should welcome the opportunity for further soul-searching while you are in medical school. And beyond.
 

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DoctorPardi said:
I have talked to a lot of people and while I certainly don't think medical school will be easy, in some ways it will be easier for me than undergrad. Right now I am working full time, taking a lot of classes, volunteering, etc. During medical school, I'll be taking a lot of classes, and that's it lol. Plus when you factor in that a lot of the time you don't have to go to class, you can read transcripts and study on your own, really it may not be so bad.

A lot of this will depend on what school you go to. If you go to a crazy school that requires attendence to every lecture and doesn't have or allow some type of transcription service, then yeah you might be working as much as the OP suggests. So pick the schools you apply too wisely is I guess the moral of the story.

I feel the same way. I know med school will be a lot of work, but I'm excited about the fact that I don't have to work (and do volunteering etc.) while doing it. It's kinda like, "WOW, I get to go to school full-time and finally quit my job!" :D
 

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Tribeca said:
I feel the same way. I know med school will be a lot of work, but I'm excited about the fact that I don't have to work (and do volunteering etc.) while doing it. It's kinda like, "WOW, I get to go to school full-time and finally quit my job!" :D
Yeah, I can't wait to quit working. Plus I really enjoy school, I wish I could quit working right now, but that just isn't going to be possible. I've been trying to stay in shape in college and work out, but there isn't a lot of time. When I am in medical school I plan on running like everyday and working out as much as I've wanted too in college.

No doubt, it will be more studying and classes than undergrad, but all things considered I am looking forward to a great medical school experience.
 
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I hate to state the obvious here but a lot of people have a family and kids and still want to go into medicine. Additionally, a lot of people who are not in their early 20's want to go to medical school. Age and kids don't exclude the idea of one wanting to go into medicine.
I understand that. My point was that many people coming right out of undergrad don't necessarily mind the time commitment of medicine because medicine/their career is the most important component in their life at this point. Once a person gets to be in their late 20's/early 30's, career often takes a backseat in importance to family/friends. Can you have both? Sure. Is medicine a family friendly career? Probably not, but that primarily depends on speciality.

I too hate the moral superiority complex that some people have when they get to med-school or become docs. The best line ever is when docs say if I could do it again I wouldn't go into medicine. THEN WHY DON'T YOU QUIT THE F--KING PROFESSION AND GO DO SOMETHING THAT MAKES YOU HAPPY.
It's kind of hard to just walk away when you are 120k+ in debt. If you read the "would you do it over again" thread in the Residency forums, that seems to be the major reason why people stay in the profession.
 

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NYMC MD 2B said:
Hey all! I just wanted to offer some advice. Before you submit those applications, make sure you really are positive about becoming a doctor. The whole application process is brutal (I know, I just completed it), but don't be fooled into thinking once you are accepted, you are a "doctor." Medical school is a long, difficult road, with many sacrifices and few rewards (at least initially). I have not even had my first lecture yet, and I already have a reading assignment. My classes run 9 to 5 essentially every day, and we are expected to put in at least 4 or 5 hours of independent studying every weekday, and one full weekend day every week. Basically, you will be up every morning at the crack of dawn, in class until dinnertime, and studying until 9 or 10 every night. Now, if you are sure about your career choice, it is a wonderful, exciting thing to be a part of. But if you think that you will have any free time, or that "getting in" is the hardest part, think again.
sounds like the University of California, Berkeley. that is all.
 

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NYMC MD 2B said:
Basically, you will be up every morning at the crack of dawn, in class until dinnertime, and studying until 9 or 10 every night. Now, if you are sure about your career choice, it is a wonderful, exciting thing to be a part of. But if you think that you will have any free time, or that "getting in" is the hardest part, think again.
Wake up at 8am, classes in the morning, research and/or lab in afternoon, studying in evening. Nights out at midnight. I took Friday OR Saturday night to go out and there is no 'free' weekend. That was college for me as an engineer/premed. If what you describe is med school, then I'll have more freetime than in undergrad. :D
 

Brickhouse

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NYMC MD 2B said:
Hey all! I just wanted to offer some advice. Before you submit those applications, make sure you really are positive about becoming a doctor.

Really? Hmm I just woke up one day and decided to apply...never really gave it much thought. I think I'll have lasagna for dinner.

you're a troll, quit being mean. if you're not a troll, your med school sounds like it sucks, as per others in this thread. oh and maybe you should attend just one single day of class before you make statements with such conviction.
 

breck

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It's kind of hard to just walk away when you are 120k+ in debt. If you read the "would you do it over again" thread in the Residency forums, that seems to be the major reason why people stay in the profession.
I was referring more to the docs who are in their 40's and 50's or older, and well out of debt, who complain about how unhappy they are. It seems like most younger docs are still energetic and excited about their profession. Aside from this, we also have someone who hasn't even attended a single day of med-school yet complaining about how hard the profession is and they don't have debts as an excuse (they'll say they are advising and not complaining though). However, the $120K+ in debt isn't really the best excuse in the world either. People act like med school is the most expensive thing in the world. There are tons of people who have total expenses greater than $30K per year at private colleges and come out of undergrad with debts in the neighborhood of $120k and they survive. It isn't fun, but they survive. Even if the in debt docs feel like they must stay in the profession to pay off all of their debts there is no excuse for all the bitc--n and moaning and discouraging others from pursuing their dreams.
 

Dr.Acula

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Dear Lord Baby Jesus, this thread is dumb
 

Law2Doc

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NonTradMed said:
Wake up at 8am, classes in the morning, research and/or lab in afternoon, studying in evening. Nights out at midnight. I took Friday OR Saturday night to go out and there is no 'free' weekend. That was college for me as an engineer/premed. If what you describe is med school, then I'll have more freetime than in undergrad. :D
You have just described the schedule of many of the more serious med students, so you are probably in good shape, habits-wise. I see nothing "mythical" about the OPs post, although some schools don't have full day lecture and require more on-your-own study. But the hours seem pretty realistic for many. Some with better memories or those who care less about grades can probably get by with less. You can probably manage to go out both Friday and Saturday nights on non-pre-test weeks, but won't want to drink enough to impair the following morning's studying. Depending on how spread out your exams are, you can probably have a lighter weekend or two each month.
But bottom line, the OP's point is a good one -- be sure you like where you are going, because it can be a bumpy road to get there.
 

MirrorTodd

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Law2Doc said:
You have just described the schedule of many of the more serious med students, so you are probably in good shape, habits-wise. I see nothing "mythical" about the OPs post, although some schools don't have full day lecture and require more on-your-own study. But the hours seem pretty realistic for many. Some with better memories or those who care less about grades can probably get by with less. You can probably manage to go out both Friday and Saturday nights on non-pre-test weeks, but won't want to drink enough to impair the following morning's studying. Depending on how spread out your exams are, you can probably have a lighter weekend or two each month.
But bottom line, the OP's point is a good one -- be sure you like where you are going, because it can be a bumpy road to get there.
Again, you've proved to articulate my point so much better than I was able to.
 

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breck said:
I was referring more to the docs who are in their 40's and 50's or older, and well out of debt, who complain about how unhappy they are. It seems like most younger docs are still energetic and excited about their profession.
LOL - actually you have it backwards. It is the younger people who are the squeaky wheels in medicine -- the ones being complained about by the older folk as having a supposed "air of entitlement", and an unrealistic level of expectation of salary and hours. Most of the people who complain are those whose realities are not matching up to their dreams, thanks to a lot of the changes in medicine in the last few decades.
 

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Back when I was in high school, my college friends would tell me that college was a lot more difficult. Once I got into college, I found it to be much easier than high school. You take more classes you enjoy since gen ed classes don't take up your entire schedule (like HS). Since you're interested in the subject, you'll naturally learn the material better. This should extend into med school even more because you don't have to take some gen ed classes like in undergrad. I don't think it will be too bad at all. If you keeping making yourself think the classes are going to be impossible, you'll end up with a self-fulfilling prophecy.
 

Law2Doc

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WilliamsF1 said:
Back when I was in high school, my college friends would tell me that college was a lot more difficult. Once I got into college, I found it to be much easier than high school. You take more classes you enjoy since gen ed classes don't take up your entire schedule (like HS). Since you're interested in the subject, you'll naturally learn the material better. This should extend into med school even more because you don't have to take some gen ed classes like in undergrad. I don't think it will be too bad at all. If you keeping making yourself think the classes are going to be impossible, you'll end up with a self-fulfilling prophecy.
The classes aren't impossible -- actually the material in med school isn't all that difficult, and probably not more complex than college. The VOLUME is what is difficult. The often used "trying to drink from a firehose" is an apt analogy. Expect to spend a lot more time at the books than college. But don't worry about it, because everyone in your class will be doing the same thing, and very very few don't make it through.
 

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MirrorTodd said:
Again, you've proved to articulate my point so much better than I was able to.
Do you think, for just 10 seconds, you could take your lips off Law's ass?
 

WilliamsF1

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Law2Doc said:
The classes aren't impossible -- actually the material in med school isn't all that difficult, and probably not more complex than college. The VOLUME is what is difficult. The often used "trying to drink from a firehose" is an apt analogy. Expect to spend a lot more time at the books than college. But don't worry about it, because everyone in your class will be doing the same thing, and very very few don't make it through.
Not sure if this depends by school, but is your work mainly reading textbooks and learning or do you also have a lot of papers, presentations, lab reports, etc?
 

MirrorTodd

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gregMD said:
Do you think, for just 10 seconds, you could take your lips off Law's ass?
No, I made a deal with Satan. That's how I'm going to Med. school.
Muahahahahahaha. Hijack done.
 

Law2Doc

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WilliamsF1 said:
Not sure if this depends by school, but is your work mainly reading textbooks and learning or do you also have a lot of papers, presentations, lab reports, etc?
It definitely depends on schools, and especially whether or not they use PBL, but your grades will primarilly come from tests, which you will study for largely from the voluminous course note-set they provide, as well as lecture slides/notes. Textbooks, board review guides, etc. will usually be secondary references and not your primary source of study, but you are permitted to learn the info from whatever source works best for you. Obviously the note-set focuses you in on the material your professor wants you to know better than any outside source.
There aren't generally papers or lab reports in most med schools. You will probably have several presentations. Hope that helps.
 
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