Oct 4, 2015
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Hello

I have been doing a lot of research and have a keen interest in tactical emergency medicine and Pre hospital care. Especially far forward medicine.

Has anyone ever heard of the Army 528th sustainment brigade or the Navy shock trauma platoon?

What are there capabilites? What kind of medical training will we have the opportunity to go through? Tactical training? Airborne? Any one who has experience with these units? Can one make these assignments a career? How far forward can one go in these situations? Any chances to work in and around special ops like rangers SF marsoc etc?



Thanks
 

pgg

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I have no experience with those specific units.

In general there are very few spots in any service for physicians to be embedded with SF type units.

Where are you in your education/training? Last time you posted in the forum, you were a US citizen in med school outside the US, right? Are you done with school?

I think your path to that kind of position, if it really exists, is residency followed by joining via direct accession, and an operational billet (that will not be SF). To be honest, the few military doctors that wind up in those positions tend to have prior military service with those kinds of units, then they go to med school, then they find their way back.
 

Homunculus

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if this is what you want to do ("far forward medicine") you should be a combat medic, corpsman (navy/SEALS), army SF medic (18D) or similar.

first question I would ask is why are you so interested in this. is it the kinetic warfighting adrenaline aspect or the medical care? if it's the former you should not try to live that by being a doc. if it's the latter you will do the most good as a doc not at the point of injury but at the nearest FST or where servicemembers are evac'd to for "real" (docs with our toys) care. without our "stuff" we're just a glorified medic. so skip the wait and just go to point of injury as a medic.

you could make a career of operational medicine but spending 20 yrs at the literal and figurative "tip of the spear" would be difficult if not impossible.

"tactical training"-- what does this mean? airborne school could be done, but prior to becoming a doc. again-- if you want to jump out of planes, assault the objective and patch up and package the guys injured/killed while killing people and breaking things, you'd be better served just doing it from the start.

good luck

--your friendly neighborhood prepping for NTC again caveman
 
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Oct 4, 2015
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if this is what you want to do ("far forward medicine") you should be a combat medic, corpsman (navy/SEALS), army SF medic (18D) or similar.

first question I would ask is why are you so interested in this. is it the kinetic warfighting adrenaline aspect or the medical care? if it's the former you should not try to live that by being a doc. if it's the latter you will do the most good as a doc not at the point of injury but at the nearest FST or where servicemembers are evac'd to for "real" (docs with our toys) care. without our "stuff" we're just a glorified medic. so skip the wait and just go to point of injury as a medic.

you could make a career of operational medicine but spending 20 yrs at the literal and figurative "tip of the spear" would be difficult if not impossible.

"tactical training"-- what does this mean? airborne school could be done, but prior to becoming a doc. again-- if you want to jump out of planes, assault the objective and patch up and package the guys injured/killed while killing people and breaking things, you'd be better served just doing it from the start.

good luck

--your friendly neighborhood prepping for NTC again caveman
Becoming a 18 d after rwsidency seems a bit of misused resources.

Ok here is another question how do I work with Marines on the battlefield or atleast as close to it as possible? That's what I want to do and that is what I will become
 
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I have no experience with those specific units.

In general there are very few spots in any service for physicians to be embedded with SF type units.

Where are you in your education/training? Last time you posted in the forum, you were a US citizen in med school outside the US, right? Are you done with school?

I think your path to that kind of position, if it really exists, is residency followed by joining via direct accession, and an operational billet (that will not be SF). To be honest, the few military doctors that wind up in those positions tend to have prior military service with those kinds of units, then they go to med school, then they find their way back.
Sir the last time I posted I had some pretty obvious misconcievdmed notions that when I found out about these two groups in mentioned. I have seen lectures and read material of people with no prior service getting into these positions.
Ok like I asked below sir how can I work with Marines on the battlefield or atleast as close as possible. Are docs in the marines repsected?
 

Homunculus

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Becoming a 18 d after rwsidency seems a bit of misused resources.

Ok here is another question how do I work with Marines on the battlefield or atleast as close to it as possible? That's what I want to do and that is what I will become
I didn't say post residency. all the medic fields would be a different path-- you may need to re-read my response.

if you want close proximity to hear/smell/taste the battle do not become a doctor. become a medic or corpsman. or just skip the middle man and enlist in the marines and do the fighting yourself.

I suggest before asking more questions stop and reflect on the answers to the questions you've already asked.

if you are looking for routine close proximity to the "front lines" being a doctor is not an efficient way to do it. end of story. you can ask the question 10 different ways and the answer will be the same.

--your friendly neighborhood just get an e-cigarette and vape cordite instead caveman
 

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MoGhazidoc1990,

As asked by others and still relevant -
Where are you in your education/training? Last time you posted in the forum, you were a US citizen in med school outside the US, right? Are you done with school?
...Ok here is another question how do I work with Marines on the battlefield or atleast as close to it as possible? That's what I want to do and that is what I will become
To work with the Marines in a medical capacity you would join the Navy. However, you have asked variations of this same question with answers provided numerous times. The guidance provided has been to either enlist or complete your residency and then commission, if eligible.

Until you are prepared to enlist or eligible to commission as an MD these questions are a snipe hunt.
 

pgg

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Sir the last time I posted I had some pretty obvious misconcievdmed notions that when I found out about these two groups in mentioned. I have seen lectures and read material of people with no prior service getting into these positions.
Ok like I asked below sir how can I work with Marines on the battlefield or atleast as close as possible. Are docs in the marines repsected?
The Marines do respect and take good care of their doctors, for the most part. Obviously much of that depends on the doctor.

This is attainable, for the most part. Basically what you're describing here is a position as the battalion surgeon for a Marine unit. These have historically been GMO tours between internship and residency, but the billets are very gradually being shifted toward residency trained doctors, mostly primary care. So residency trained people can go there now.

I did that for 3 years after internship. I was assigned to a Marine infantry battalion, did their primary care, trained and supervised about 40 Corpsmen (up to about 55 when deployed). I deployed with them twice, once to Afghanistan and once to Iraq.

Most of my time was doing sick call, not exciting. When deployed, I lived with them in forward deployed areas, and there were a few occasions when I went with them on operations. But I kicked no doors, didn't carry a rifle, just sat in the rear and hoped no one got hurt. If you were motivated to put yourself in dangerous situations, you probably could. But that's not why we're there.

Two large ops in Iraq - the first I went along with the forward aid station, about a mile behind our advancing line. All the casualties overflew me to the FRSS. I took care of a few civilians who got hurt. Mostly did nothing except sit in a covered area wearing body armor hoping a mortar wouldn't find me. The second op I stayed back at the FRSS and made myself useful there. Much better decision.

You could probably join the Navy post residency and get yourself one of those operational billets with the Marines. They aren't super popular because it's mostly boring URIs and minor ortho and cluster B psych and derm with the occasional STD excitement - aka primary care for a bunch of 18-25 yo super healthy guys.

I enjoyed my time with the Marines. I look back at it with some satisfaction. There were some problems and other issues, and I've written about some of that on this forum. But it's something I'm glad I did. It was a good time in my life.
 

WernickeDO

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There was a navy surgeon near the fighting during Iraq 2. Not sure how he got there or how it turned out.
I think you're talking about Dr Jadick, author of "On Call In Hell". He's the guy who set up an aid station in Fallujah right next to where some of the fiercest fighting was occurring. It's certainly possible to get near to the s**t but unlikely to actually be on patrol with Marines/soldiers. Additionally, since we seem to have adapted to an airstrikes + training of the local military rather than boots on the ground, it's unlikely that there's going to be much combat until we go to war with Russia.
 

Marine2MD

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I think you're talking about Dr Jadick, author of "On Call In Hell". He's the guy who set up an aid station in Fallujah right next to where some of the fiercest fighting was occurring. It's certainly possible to get near to the s**t but unlikely to actually be on patrol with Marines/soldiers. Additionally, since we seem to have adapted to an airstrikes + training of the local military rather than boots on the ground, it's unlikely that there's going to be much combat until we go to war with Russia.
Not on patrol, very unlikely. We did have a Navy Battalion Surgeon come with us on a convey to an outlying FOB that got attacked in '06. He came along to check up on one of his corpsmen that got rotated in and give him some news personally. Closest I can think of outside of Dr. Jadick.
 
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