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DRed

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Hey everybody,
I'm new here and am looking for some advice. I'm graduating from undergrad this year and have not applied yet. This leaves me some time to enhance my application. The only things I can think of to do on my "year off" are CNA work, or take two years and get a master's degree. I'm sort of lacking in clinical experience and will only have one summer of research. Any advice would be greatly appreciated.
Thanks,
DRed
 

ad_sharp

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I worked as a CNA while in undergrad. It helped me tremendously when I applied to medical school. The majority of two interviews delt with my experiences there. However, you will have your bachelor's degree. I think that you should definitely try for something slightly higher in the healthcare ladder than CNA. The work is rough, and (as Rodney Dangerfield says) you get no respect. Any healthcare experience is good experience. Try EMT, LPN, or phlebotomy. Also, I think that going to grad school to work on a master's is an excellent idea. However, I would encourage you to pursue shadowing or some other volunteer service to get experience. Medical schools like to see that you have served people and enjoy doing it. Hope this helps and best of luck.
 

Ryo-Ohki

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High school dropouts make up the primary CNA workforce.

Try for the master's.
 
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BerkeleyPremed

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I think going into a master's program would be a great idea. I'm thinking about a master's in biology. I'm just trying to narrow down a list of schools to apply to for the master's program.
 

YoungFaithful

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I agree with both of the above posters. CNA is a great job if using it as a stepping stone. I did have some conflicts during my time at the nursing home with 22 year old single moms with 3 kids and an abusive boyfriends. I'm sure the applicant pool for CNA is not too sharp.

On the other side of things, I have been a CNA for 1.5 years and medical schools loved this. During interviews we talked about my experiences for the majority of the interview. All of the schools really appriciated my butt wiping jobs, I think that's what got me my acceptance.

My adivce: Do both!! I have been working 24 hrs as a CNA through undergrad on the weekends. Its not bad. Aren't most deadlines for masters programs past?

Good luck!
YF
 

BerkeleyPremed

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I'm probably going to apply for a master's in neurobiology..or a master's in biotech. If I could get into a master's in molecular bio..that would be awesome. I'll probably apply in the Fall of 2005 for the master's programs.
 

Pinkertinkle

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Certified Nursing Assistant, they do all the crap that even LVN's don't do.
 

docmemi

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i would go for the masters if your undergrad grades arent great. otherwise go for the cna...you can get some great experience and talk about it in your personal statement and interviews. plus its only a year, not two years.
 

DoctorWannaBe

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I graduated from college and took a year off, hoping to get some paid clinical experience, but haven't been able to get a job. One thing you need to consider is that you will need to be trained to be a CNA. In my experience looking for CNA jobs, most hospitals/nursing homes required you to already have the CNA certification from a local community college. I didn't have the CNA training and was told I wasn't qualified enough to be a CNA, even though I was an EMT and was accepted to medical school a few weeks later!
 

ad_sharp

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I don't know about every state, but here you have 120 days after beginning employment as a CNA to get certified. The class is only a week or two and sometimes the employer will pay for it.
 

shawred

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I would seriously recommend the CNA route. Also, I would see if I could find out the state laws regarding certification. I work as a caregiver at an assisted living facility in Texas. It is basically the same work as a CNA in a nicer/cleaner environment. Moreover, here in Texas I am not required to be certified as a CNA to work in assisted living. Moreover, I work also work as a medication aide. Once again, I am not required to be licensed as a med aide because I work in assisted living. Many states require certification, but not all. Nursing homes, however, do require certification.

When I interviewed, it was a big plus. Working with the elderly is definitely a bonus. They love that type of experience because most individuals shy away from older individuals. However, I also have a masters in clinical gerontology.
 
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