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Hello all,

Looking for any input and/or advice that is available regarding the matter. There is an option at the school I attend to obtain a dual degree with a Masters in Anatomy. It requires an extra 11 credits or so outside the core DO curriculum and is designed to be completed by graduation. The other option I am interested in is being a TA for our surgical skills course which is a large time commitment in itself, and I don't foresee it being possible to do both.

My question is would it be worth it to obtain the MSA with the top two fields I'm interested in being Orthopedics and General Surgery? Will it be a benefit when applying for residencies in those fields?

Any help or info is greatly appreciated!

JP
 

DopaDO

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Hello all,

Looking for any input and/or advice that is available regarding the matter. There is an option at the school I attend to obtain a dual degree with a Masters in Anatomy. It requires an extra 11 credits or so outside the core DO curriculum and is designed to be completed by graduation. The other option I am interested in is being a TA for our surgical skills course which is a large time commitment in itself, and I don't foresee it being possible to do both.

My question is would it be worth it to obtain the MSA with the top two fields I'm interested in being Orthopedics and General Surgery? Will it be a benefit when applying for residencies in those fields?

Any help or info is greatly appreciated!

JP
I can't imagine this being even the least bit useful for residency applications. If you want to do it, then sure.

I wouldn't do it bc it will take away from Step study time.
 

AlbinoHawk DO

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Useless degree. You probably don't even do substantial research for it.
 
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235009

Hello all,

Looking for any input and/or advice that is available regarding the matter. There is an option at the school I attend to obtain a dual degree with a Masters in Anatomy. It requires an extra 11 credits or so outside the core DO curriculum and is designed to be completed by graduation. The other option I am interested in is being a TA for our surgical skills course which is a large time commitment in itself, and I don't foresee it being possible to do both.

My question is would it be worth it to obtain the MSA with the top two fields I'm interested in being Orthopedics and General Surgery? Will it be a benefit when applying for residencies in those fields?

Any help or info is greatly appreciated!

JP
the masters degree is absolutely useless, will increase your debt (directly and/or indirectly), will needlessly extend your schooling without providing you with any useful skills/knowledge, and won't make a difference when you're applying to residency. sounds a bit like a scam that they'd offer this to people who are already in med school.

the TA job is different though. you might actually get something out of that (teaching something makes you better at it) and can be an interesting thing to take about at interviews. i doubt it'll set you apart but if it's not going to get in the way of more important things (grades and step 1) then go for it
 

hallowmann

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the masters degree is absolutely useless, will increase your debt (directly and/or indirectly), will needlessly extend your schooling without providing you with any useful skills/knowledge, and won't make a difference when you're applying to residency. sounds a bit like a scam that they'd offer this to people who are already in med school...
It shouldn't extend schooling, as its 11 credits spread across the 4 years, not any real additional time, but it likely will cost something financially.

I could only see this sort of thing as being useful if OP plans to go into teaching, and specifically teaching anatomy at a med school/university.

...the TA job is different though. you might actually get something out of that (teaching something makes you better at it) and can be an interesting thing to take about at interviews. i doubt it'll set you apart but if it's not going to get in the way of more important things (grades and step 1) then go for it
I completely agree with this.
 
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235009

I could only see this sort of thing as being useful if OP plans to go into teaching, and specifically teaching anatomy at a med school/university.
Anatomy at a university or med school is not taught by a physician. It's typically taught by anatomy phds.
 

NontradCA

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Don't do it.
 

hallowmann

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Anatomy at a university or med school is not taught by a physician. It's typically taught by anatomy phds.
He would have a MS and a DO. While it is not typically taught by non-PhDs, I wouldn't be surprised if he'd be able to find a job teaching anatomy at a university. I personally know a few individuals with MS's in the sciences that are teaching at the university level.

Now why someone who wants to be a physician would aspire to teach something like anatomy is beyond me, so it doesn't make much sense to me except for the addition of the letters behind someone's name.
 

W19

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He would have a MS and a DO. While it is not typically taught by non-PhDs, I wouldn't be surprised if he'd be able to find a job teaching anatomy at a university. I personally know a few individuals with MS's in the sciences that are teaching at the university level.

Now why someone who wants to be a physician would aspire to teach something like anatomy is beyond me, so it doesn't make much sense to me except for the addition of the letters behind someone's name.
Do you really need a MS in anatomy to teach at the university level? I thought you could do that with just the MD/DO degree...
 
OP
J
Mar 28, 2013
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He would have a MS and a DO. While it is not typically taught by non-PhDs, I wouldn't be surprised if he'd be able to find a job teaching anatomy at a university. I personally know a few individuals with MS's in the sciences that are teaching at the university level.

Now why someone who wants to be a physician would aspire to teach something like anatomy is beyond me, so it doesn't make much sense to me except for the addition of the letters behind someone's name.
It is more so my enjoyment of anatomy and dissections that I'm even considering the option. The only way to be a TA for anatomy is as a masters student, which is something I would really enjoy if not for the having to add a degree. There is also research associated with the program, however, I haven't looked into that portion of it extensively and they should be having an informational session in November/December as we can apply for the program in January-ish.
 

hallowmann

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Do you really need a MS in anatomy to teach at the university level? I thought you could do that with just the MD/DO degree...
I'm sure it depends on the school. I was simply making the comment that I know people who teach it in universities with MS (i.e. without a PhD).

It is more so my enjoyment of anatomy and dissections that I'm even considering the option. The only way to be a TA for anatomy is as a masters student, which is something I would really enjoy if not for the having to add a degree. There is also research associated with the program, however, I haven't looked into that portion of it extensively and they should be having an informational session in November/December as we can apply for the program in January-ish.
I get why you are considering it. I was saying though that no one who goes to school to be a doctor is primarily aspiring to teach anatomy at the university level when they graduate. You're still planning to be a physician working as such, regardless of whether you have a MS in anatomy or not. Maybe someone might aspire to be a clinician teaching in a medical school/teaching hospital, but its not like docs are graduating with their MD/DO and saying, "I want to go teach anatomy at state university".

For you, the main benefits would be what MeatTornado described about the TAing.
 
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Goro

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The school is just trying to mine you for more tuition money.


Hello all,

Looking for any input and/or advice that is available regarding the matter. There is an option at the school I attend to obtain a dual degree with a Masters in Anatomy. It requires an extra 11 credits or so outside the core DO curriculum and is designed to be completed by graduation. The other option I am interested in is being a TA for our surgical skills course which is a large time commitment in itself, and I don't foresee it being possible to do both.

My question is would it be worth it to obtain the MSA with the top two fields I'm interested in being Orthopedics and General Surgery? Will it be a benefit when applying for residencies in those fields?

Any help or info is greatly appreciated!

JP