crystal_lover_

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hi! I was wondering what I needed to accomplish in order to match into OB/GYN in California. Do pre-clinical grades matter? Does research need to be in OB/GYN?
 

Hkhan

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Grades generally only matter for AOA, so preclinicals matter to a point. It is preferable to have specialty specific research, but general medical research can only help, not hurt you (unless that research is in another field and it somehow looks like you're applying to two specialties which can lead PDs to think you're not committed to OB).
 

Winged Scapula

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Grades generally only matter for AOA, so preclinicals matter to a point. It is preferable to have specialty specific research, but general medical research can only help, not hurt you (unless that research is in another field and it somehow looks like you're applying to two specialties which can lead PDs to think you're not committed to OB).
High school sophomores should not be giving advise about residency matching. You've been warned several times to stop misrepresenting yourself, yet you continue to post on topic you know nothing about.
 
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neoevolution

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hi! I was wondering what I needed to accomplish in order to match into OB/GYN in California. Do pre-clinical grades matter? Does research need to be in OB/GYN?
Are you from Cali? I've heard people who aren't should try to do aways there, to show interest in the region and hopefully impress a few programs personally.

OB is less competitive than average, but research should help and it might as well be field specific if you know that's what you want to do.

Preclinical grades aren't considered very important on the program director's survey, but preparing for preclinical classes well usually translates to higher Step 1 performance which everyone will care about.
 

W19

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High school sophomores should not be giving advise about residency matching. You've been warned several times to stop misrepresenting yourself, yet you continue to post on topic you know nothing about.
A hs sophomore is giving advice about the match! That is impressive! Is he/she really a hs sophomore?
 
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anonperson

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hi! I was wondering what I needed to accomplish in order to match into OB/GYN in California. Do pre-clinical grades matter? Does research need to be in OB/GYN?
Minimum : (no particular order)
Good step 1 scores
Good third year grades
Good letters (preferably from name brand people)
Come from a good school

Research isn't that important and is low yield. It is a clinical residency and most OB GYN departments, especially the general division are not pumping out high quality research.

During my fellowship, I interviewed applicants one year. This was at a well known academic program in CA. Average step 1 score was 240 or so and i remember seeing a 260 in the mix. Usually came from name brand schools as well. No DOs either.

When i applied for OB GYN, i had 2 first author publications which made for decent interview fodder but i know of at least one program that didn't even bother to rank me. I had other baggage (low step 1, repeated a year, professionalism violation). I ended up getting the last laugh though.

The specialty gets a bad rap but it is a decent gig. Job is demanding but it is secure. Most patients and physicians are not comfortable with the anatomy or physiology. Plus at the end of the day, putting in face time with patients is what builds value. It's a pain in the a$$ at times but it is reality. You'll see specialties that have no face time or limited patient interaction start to be treated like an interchangeable commodity.

You'll have no trouble finding a job in any part of the country.
 
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Winged Scapula

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A hs sophomore is giving advice about the match! That is impressive! Is he/she really a hs sophomore?
Claims to be in his first SDN posts and that he was born in 2002. Even if that's untrue, then he's guilty of misrepresenting himself which we take seriously
 
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crystal_lover_

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Jan 12, 2016
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Just focus on doing the best you can on step 1. If you're really only premed though you should first try to get into med school and see what OB is really like.. Stressful, long hours (50+/week), high malpractice insurance, and mediocre pay is what I was told by attendings on rotations. Also, the smell and visual from a pregnant patient who accidentally pooped while pushing to get her baby out is something I never want to witness again.
I'm already in medical school. I don't know who that hSDN member is. I shadowed a lot of specialties but I went into OB and knew it was the one for me.
 

Tozanzibarbymotorcar

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May 28, 2017
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Minimum : (no particular order)
Good step 1 scores
Good third year grades
Good letters (preferably from name brand people)
Come from a good school

Research isn't that important and is low yield. It is a clinical residency and most OB GYN departments, especially the general division are not pumping out high quality research.

During my fellowship, I interviewed applicants one year. This was at a well known academic program in CA. Average step 1 score was 240 or so and i remember seeing a 260 in the mix. Usually came from name brand schools as well. No DOs either.

When i applied for OB GYN, i had 2 first author publications which made for decent interview fodder but i know of at least one program that didn't even bother to rank me. I had other baggage (low step 1, repeated a year, professionalism violation). I ended up getting the last laugh though.

The specialty gets a bad rap but it is a decent gig. Job is demanding but it is secure. Most patients and physicians are not comfortable with the anatomy or physiology. Plus at the end of the day, putting in face time with patients is what builds value. It's a pain in the a$$ at times but it is reality. You'll see specialties that have no face time or limited patient interaction start to be treated like an interchangeable commodity.

You'll have no trouble finding a job in any part of the country.
@anonperson - why no DOs? I'm genuinely curious...
 
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