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Maximizing effectiveness of Kerodox for that glove/anatomy lab smell

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Nickel

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I was told that Kerodox (is it Kerodex?) helps with that smell on your hands after anatomy lab.

I bought a tube and tried it, and it sorta works. It works better if I apply a lot of it. I tried to "set it" with cold water like it says to do on the back of the tube. I feel like I ended up just patting it off when I was patting my hands dry.

Does anybody want to let me know what method of Kerodox application works for them? Or, what other things can I do to reduce that smell, so I can enjoy my dinner to the fullest?

BTW, my husband says that there is a big difference between using kerodox and not using kerodox. If I don't use it, even a long shower won't get the latex smell of my hands. If I do use it, the smell will be very faint after a few hours of being away from the lab.
 

rubyness

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Try Febreeze for the cadaver, your gloved hands and your scrubs and labcoat. It doesn't remove the smell completely, but it helps.
 

mike_D

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Dude, Lever 2000...lather up twice or so.............no joke
 

imtiaz

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i find wearing latex gloves and then putting on a pair of kitchen gloves (the kind that you wash dishes with) eliminates the smell from your hands entirely. or at least it has for me. try it and see if it works for you. i've actually handled my cadaver pretty extensively wearing this setup and my hands don't smell one bit afterwards.
 

KWBum

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I love it! :laugh:

You know, at my school, some of the lab assistants (all MD's), didn't use anything at all when they touched the cadaver...

...yeah, yeah...I know, I know...all the hazards of formaldehyde...

But, they'd just poke at it, and then wash their hands. And there was this old pathologist at Brigham and Women's, where I spent some time, who'd poke at stuff with his pipe, say, "Hmmmmm..." and then stick the pipe right back in his mouth. I think he was, like, 93...I dunno, I suppose you just get inured to it all after a while.

KWBum
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cchoukal

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I think the biggest problem is that you're using latex in the first place. A number of my classmates from last year reported that their hands would go numb in latex gloves (from the cadaver fixative getting thru the glove), and I noted myself that the latex gloves seemed to leak more. Switch to Nitrile gloves; they're just way better, even if you don't double glove. You won't smell latex or the cadaver on you afterwards.
 

dr. maybe

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I agree with the Nitrile gloves. My hands have only smelled one time with the nitrile and that was when I did all the dissection for 3 hours straight. Otherwise, I have never had any stinky problems. Nitrile rocks!!!
 
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