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MCAT advice for low GPA-er?

Discussion in 'Pre-Medical - MD' started by jenv1082, Jul 2, 2002.

  1. jenv1082

    jenv1082 Member

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    I'm entering my 3rd year with a 3.0 cum and a 2.89 bcpm. It really sucks.
    From what I've been hearing, I need to get an ABOVE stellar MCAT score to even
    have a chance to get into good med schools. I'm planning on taking the MCATs next
    spring in addition to a Kaplan prep course...any advice on aceing the exam
    that will determine my whole future?? Or on my situation in general? <img border="0" title="" alt="[Frown]" src="frown.gif" />
     
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  3. blkdawn

    blkdawn Member

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    My biggest and best piece of advice is to not listen to the nay-sayers that will undoubtedly feel that it is their duty to inform you that there is no way you will get into med school.

    You are correct, unless you plan on doing a post-bacc program or going for a Master's degree in a hard-science, you WILL need to BLOW AWAY the MCAT. Start those practice tests from now.

    Good luck! :)
     
  4. sluox

    Physician

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    There is a large component of luck with getting 40-43 MCAT. Do the math. In physical science section, the difference between a 13 and a 15 is usually only 2 to 3 questions. If you randomly guess, then out of 3 questions, the chance of getting all of them right is (1/4)^3=1/64. That is, one out of sixty four kids who has the aptitude of a 13 will get automatically get a 15 no matter what he pick as his answers. Considering that the curve of 15 is around 99.99%, these random occurances may constitute the entire set of students who get 15s.

    So, in addition to practicing and studying, you may want to consult a mulah or swami or friar or monk or whatever, and getting the best luck you can get on the exam day. And you better kneel down and pray to gods of all religions. And I'm not joking. Just be aware of the randomness involved.
     
  5. shorrin

    shorrin the ninth doctor

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    here's another thought. This thought is the conclusion that I came to my third year of college round about say feb. (I graduated in three years so year three was my last year)

    I had decided at the end of my second year summer ochem class that I would apply to med school. I didn't have the money to spend on a review course so I signed up for the uni offered course in the fall.

    The stress of studying for the mcat, getting letters, writing a personal statement, looking for a job in my year out and doing well in my classes was too much for me. So, I decided to wait to take the mcat and apply till after I graduated. Two years out would be good.

    I was told time and again that applying is something you do not want to do more than once and having gone through it once I would not want to do it again. The stress, the money the time and disapointment are a lot to handle.

    I certainly didn't want to take that advice at first but with my 3.3ish, C+'s in four bcpm classes and no volunteer experience I realized I just had to get my GPA up.

    You'll read all over the board how most people think that a postbacc (which you might not qualify for since you already have your pre-med recs done) or masters stellar GPA will not cover up what you lacked in undergrad. The admissions committees, some believe, view graduate GPA's as inflated and rely upon UG GPA as a better indicator of potential med-school performance. It's not mean it's just that they have to make certain first and foremost that you CAN do the coursework.

    So, that all said, my advice would be to concentrate your last two years on getting that GPA up, getting some good volunteer and research experience. Get to know your profs well and do well in their class so you can get a stellar rec. You have two years! That's a huge opportunity!!!

    This is just one option, I'm sure you'll find a solution that works for you!! And ditto to blkdawn!! If someone says you can't do it, don't return to them for advice and don't believe them becuase the minute you do then it will be true.
     
  6. Raptor

    Raptor Found one

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    shorrin you are right on target. Jenv1082, how goals are attainable, so if YOU want to do it don't let anybody decide what you can or can not do. Plus envision yourself attaining your goal and that should do the trick. In addition, success is the biggest revenge :D .
     
  7. missbonnie

    missbonnie floating

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    </font><blockquote><font size="1" face="Verdana, Helvetica, sans-serif">quote:</font><hr /><font size="2" face="Verdana, Helvetica, sans-serif">Originally posted by shorrin:
    <strong>And ditto to blkdawn!! If someone says you can't do it, don't return to them for advice and don't believe them becuase the minute you do then it will be true.</strong></font><hr /></blockquote><font size="2" face="Verdana, Helvetica, sans-serif">so true.
     
  8. UCLA2000

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    This is the best advice I can give you. Take it literally because I'm not being sarcastic here.

    Study harder in school in order to get better grades, and study your ass off for the MCAT.
     
  9. UNCgirl

    UNCgirl New Member

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    Don't forget, medical schools will also take a look at your general trend in grades. That is, if your GPA is low, but your grades obviously improved as you progressed through college, medical schools will take notice. It'll help you out!

    Also, keep in mind that sometime medical schools will give you a chance to explain your GPA; perhaps you rushed a sorority or had mono.

    Finally, there are medical schools that are easier to get into than others. Look into your state schools. I'm guessing you are a North Carolina resident (go Heels!), so maybe think UNC or ECU.
     

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