MCAT advice PLEASE HELP ME!

Discussion in 'Pre-Medical - DO' started by DoctorFeelGood, Jun 14, 2000.

  1. DoctorFeelGood

    DoctorFeelGood Junior Member

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    Hi~ I took the April MCAT... I received my scores and I didn't do as well as I wanted to. I took Princton Review last semester, and now I'm taking it again. I'm horrible at Verbal, but I also wouldn?t mind boosting up my BS & PS sections a few points. What advice do you have for me? How should I study? What should I do? I want roughly about a 28-32...

    Thanks, Good Luck to everyone!

     
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  3. RKK

    RKK Junior Member

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    I'm also in the same boat. I took the August MCAT last year and I'm re-taking it this coming August since I'd like to boost my PS. I took Kaplan the first time and I'm taking it again this year. My advice would be to do as many practice tests as you can AND to look at the answers and explanations to the questions you get wrong. Also, I'm studying with a friend this year and I'm finding that it's really a big help.

    Good luck!
     
  4. Djanaba

    Djanaba Senior Member

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    Another idea, too: get yourself an MCAT prep book that's *not* Kaplan or Princeton Review. Do it on your own; including the practice tests and chapters and self-evals. They will ask slightly different questions, give different explanations, and likely help you get a better, more well-rounded grasp on the stuff. It certainly won't *hurt* your score!
     
  5. youngjock

    youngjock Banned
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    I have been reading this forum a lot lately.

    I think that we need more medical schools. yes, a person can improve his/her own mcat, but that is not the point. I suppose every normal person can do that. Why does a person have to wait for another year or two so that s/he can improve her/his mcat score?

    It is the still the same person with the same physical body, and brain. medical schools are blinded by mcat, gpa. of course, there are so many of us applying.

    i expect that, in the year of 3000, med schools would be as easy as applying a regular college. Besides, now these days computer can do lots of things for us, in the year of 3000, maybe computer engineers would be the richest people.

     
  6. RollTide

    RollTide Senior Member

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    You are an absolute idiot
     
  7. mj

    mj Senior Member

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    Rolltide,

    I'm curious why you believe youngjocks opinion that allowing supply and demand to regulate the amount of physcians with in the market makes him/her an "idiot".

    Please elaborate.

    mj
     
  8. RollTide

    RollTide Senior Member

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    Mj,

    My comment does not relate exclusively to youngjock's comment on the supply and demand of physicians in the U.S., it includes his argument of the invalidity of MCAT scores and his posts on other topics in this forum and others. His/her suggestion that any NORMAL person can improve their MCAT score enough to gain admission to medical school is incorrect. Those of us who have taken this exam know how difficult it is to improve your score by just a couple of points(provided you prepared properly the first time). There is one person here in another thread who took the exam five times to improve their score from a 19 to a 24! Then he or she goes on to argue that the scores are not a valid mean of which to evaluate applicants:

    " medical schools are blinded by mcat, gpa."

    Anyone who has evaluated the AMA/AAMC data relating to this study understands that the MCAT is the BEST tool we have to evaluate the potential success of an applicant. Simply put, the better one does on the MCAT, the more likely they are to succeed in medical school.

    As for the supply and demand issue, you are welcome to disagree with me but I prefer to have the AMA control the number of physicians in this country for several reasons rather than letting things take care of themselves.

    1) I am a capitalist, in my opinion competition improves the quality of a service or product in most situations. By the AMA restricting the number of students graduating from medical school, they are keeping competition high, thus ensuring a better product.

    2)The AMA's restriction produces a large applicant pool for fewer actaul seats in medical school classes. This allows medical schools to set very strict criteria for admission. This means that most entering medical students not only have four years of undergraduate work, but also ensures that they represent the top 10% of their class. If you would like an example of how things can go wrong, look at primary education. There have been several recent studies that show that our public school teachers, for the most part, represent the bottom quarter of college's grauating classes. I think most of us can agree that the quality of primary school teachers needs to vastly improve. In my own state the teachers were asked to take the graduation exam that is required of all students inorder to graduate from HS. Not only did they fail the exam at a rate higher than the students, but many could not even pass in the subject they were teaching. One of the reasons the quality is SOOOOO poor is the low salary range which brings me to my next point.

    3) By resticting the number of graduates, the AMA ensures that salaries remain relatively high. This makes recruitment of the highest caliber students a rather benign beacuse they are looking for careers which are high in prestige and relatively high in salary. If the poorest students were allowed to enter medicine( and sometimes they are), you can bet the quality of care you recieve will decline drastically.


    I apologize for being so blunt orginally but I was running out the door this morning and did not have time to comment at length.
     
  9. mj

    mj Senior Member

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    Gosh Rolltide, I don?t even know where to begin [​IMG]

    While I?m inclined to agree with you on the predicting success of the MCAT, having also read those studies, I am disinclined to agree that med schools should evaluate it as an entrance requirement, but my reasons roll into the next part of this discussion.

    1. ?By the AMA restricting the number of students graduating from medical school, they are keeping competition high, thus ensuring a better product.? ? This isn?t a preservation of the capitalistic system. If anything it better approximates the communist system of identifying where one excels and targeting training accordingly. If you don?t meet the initial screening to be a Soviet gymnast you will not be one, regardless of how hard you would work or how committed you would be. The AMA?s control of supply RESTRICTS the free market economy and flys in the face of captialism -- a system where anyone can supposedly become anything if they work hard enough at it. To say that the med school admission process is strict, is streching it a bit don't you think, given that anybody who reads even one or two post on this board realizes what a subjective component there is to the whole thing.

    2 & 3. The acceptance into med school of anyone who wishes to try, in no way compromises the quality of medical education. Your argument about teachers is insane. Poor and easy training breeds poor teachers. If teachers were put through the rigors of a training program similar to that of the medical profession, those less intellectually superior would be weeded out ?they would fail ? just like those who couldn?t hack it in med school would. As long as med schools do not compromise their education standards, nothing is lost in terms of quality. Those who graduate will be of the same quality as those who graduate now. As for the salary issue, anyone can enter the business world and many make millions. The AMA?s limiting of supply is nothing more than an unnecessary price support. As long as physicians continue to demand a salary fitting their work, salaries will not be depressed. There would just be a greater range of products to choose from.

    I didn?t mind your bluntness (can?t speak for youngjock) but I guess it?s safe to assume that you do not agree with dlbruch on his call for quality in posting. [​IMG]

    mj
     
  10. ADRIANSHOE

    ADRIANSHOE Senior Member

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    I agree with you MJ, RESTRICTION of medical students INCREASES competition? who would ever make such an argument?

    a product of a state where the teachers can't pass their own student's exams would be my only guess.

    as a caveat: At my former institution, students who fail two or three or even four classes are allowed to repeat and repeat these classes (of course they have to pay for it)...also students who have been CAUGHT REDHANDED WITH WITNESSES cheating have been allowed to continue in their studies without reprimand....ASK ANY PA from the 1999 or 2000 graduation class...there were at least FOUR separate instances in their classes alone where cheating was ignored DESPITE it having been witnessed by many. SO your argument that THE RIGORS of medical school would weed out the lesser performers is ONLY TRUE WHEN WE DEMAND SUCH RIGORS, make the tough calls when students have failed multiple times, and deal harshly with the unethical students....ANYTHING LESS IN MEDICAL EDUCATION IS UNETHICAL, which has always been my complaint regarding my former institution....put another way, if we knowingly allow students to pass who we know to have poor character, what does that say to the world about our institution?
     
  11. mj

    mj Senior Member

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    You absolutely right about your caveat, Adrian. I would also argue, though, that Rolltides perfect system here of regulating supply causes the current laxness of standards you have encountered. After all, that's revenue the school couldn't replace and they couldn't hold out their addmission standards as being so great if they admitted a few bad apples got in the barrel could they. Nor could they claim to be such great judges of academic success if they actually let a number of deserving people fail.
     
  12. RollTide

    RollTide Senior Member

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    Sorry to break it to you guys, but I am a product of the Florida school system, so your jab at my current state does not hold. I think John is a former Florida teacher right? What level did you teach at Shoe? I would like to look up the statistics for Florida. I seriously doubt they are any better than the national average. The studies(the ones that showed that primary school teachers come from the bottom of their graduating classes) I was refering to included data nation wide.

    Mj, you stated:

    "To say that the med school admission process is strict, is streching it a bit don't you think, given that anybody who reads even one or two post on this board realizes what a subjective component there is to the whole thing."

    The problem with your assertion is that USUALLY, the subjective part enters into the equation at the interview level of the admissions process. If someone has the numbers, has the ECs, and has good letters of rec., they WILL get interviews.

    As for you and Shoe's jabs about restriction not leading to competition( are you guys the same person?), ANYONE can APPLY to medical school, anyone. When you have a LARGE applicant pool applying for a LIMITED number of seats, THIS DOES lead to competition. In order for an applicant to be considered competitive, they must excel in their coursework( remain in the upper 10%). How can you argue that competition would exist at the admissions level if their were no standards in place to rate applicants on their potential success in medical school? If everone could just walk in and enter medical school, how could that be a competitive process?


    [This message has been edited by RollTide (edited 06-22-2000).]
     
  13. youngjock

    youngjock Banned
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    Like i said before, anyone can improve mcat scores. it is not impossible. one should at least have the confidence.

    a person remains the same even after s/he took the mcat and got a better score. the personality doesn't change. can one really say that the applicant has became a better person simply because s/he has a better score now?

    mcat can predict, but it can not change a person.
     
  14. ADRIANSHOE

    ADRIANSHOE Senior Member

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    you are absolutely right, the florida public school system is atrocious...sorry you had to go there because your logic speaks volumes about your school system (i taught at the college level and i saw the same type of poor thought development in many of your fellow graduates)

    COMPETITION to get in ISNT the only or even the BEST type of competition....THE BEST type of competition would be competition based upon the ability to PASS THE COURSEWORK and the CLINICAL years...this would be BEST accomplished by letting ALL people who wish to enter medical school the opportunity, then weeding out those that cant cut it from the larger pool....in such a scenario you are DIRECTLY relating motivation/ability to success, not assessing these traits indirectly via some standardized preentrance exam which DOES NOT show anything about a persons motivation to excel at medicine, but only speaks to their past science and english education.....Using the MCAT and basic science grades exclusively as criteria for entrance would severely LIMIT the pool of potentially great DOCTORS by basing their entrance on a nebulous testing of their PREVIOUS organic chemistry, basic physics and biology knowledge...ONLY the verbal section speaks directly to an applicants chances of succeeding in an english taught medical school, as there is extensive selflearning that requires a certain level of reading comprehension.
     
  15. mj

    mj Senior Member

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    When did I argue such an asinine point? There is no purpose served by trying to gauge "potential" success. Take their money and then be BRUTAL with an unprecedented standard for education. THAT'S what capitalism is about -- the right to fail if you so desire. Don't guess at which people might be able to make it through and then LOWER your standards of education when you realize your admission system wasn't perfect.

    For someone who continually accuses Shoe of ducking issues, you certainly do a fairly good job yourself Rolltide. AGAIN: your teaching argument is MOOT. It isn't a lack of strict admission standards and competition that creates poor teachers. A lack of a demanding and rigorous education creates poor teachers.

    As for Adrianshoe and I being the same person, I don't think it's that miraculous to find two people who can recognize REALLY bad logic when they see it. Better brush off those logic circuits before school starts Rolltide...

    mj
     
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  17. calvingrad

    calvingrad New Member

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    This is a rather interesting thread you've got going. My 2 cents from a philosophical perspective...

    Certainly you'd all agree that there were certain standards for entrance to your undergraduate institutions? There were some people who applied and did not get in after all, no?

    With each successive step in your education, the standards increase--for example, when you move from 1st grade to 2nd your teachers don't expect less, they expect more. Given "some reading ability" as a criteria to progress, it is ridiculous to think that just because a 1st grader *really really really* wants to read that they should progress to 2nd if they still can't. I would doubt it would be a good idea to just "give the kid a chance" if they have not been successful up until this point. (An aside, this seems to be what has happened when we graduate high school seniors who can't even read--we give too many "chances" without seeing results!)

    There is another faulty line of reasoning: that you can be anything you want to be only if you try hard enough. Now, there are occasions where someone's hard work pays off in such a way that they become something they might not have had they not given it the effort, but that is different. I could not become an opera singer no matter how I tried! Why? Not because of lack of desire, because I would really love to be able to sing well... It's because I simply have not been given that gift. I could certainly take voice lessons and give it my best shot, but at some point along the way someone would have to say, "your gifts lie elsewhere." There would be some criteria for making this 'judgement' of my ability--my voice is weak, my range is small, I have no power... Try as I may, I can't force myself to be something for which I am not naturally inclined--and my performance in a variety of areas shows that. Opera needs to have its standards too--otherwise it would turn into a karaoke night and it would no longer be opera. (Either I have to puff up my abilities--pretending to be something I am not--or I have to lower the standards--these seem to be the options)

    Likewise, medicine needs to have standards to even call itself medicine--it needs to have people with keen minds with abilities well beyond average, they need people who have caring hearts and service oriented sensibilities. But you can't have just some of those qualities and not others.

    (Another aside, I tend to think that many of the prima donnas in the profession with bedside manners from *hell* probably shouldn't have made it into medical school either--by allowing such people to practice medicine you do accept such behavior--ie, lower the standard for what it means to be a healthcare provider.)

    Progressively, you are weeded out by successive levels of education so that the cream rises to the top, so to speak--until finally, when you reach the level of applying to medical school, you undergo a further weeding.

    I think, in concept, that having GPA, MCAT scores, letters of recommendation, and an interview all as criteria to move to the next level, will provide a vast breadth of information about someone such that you would get a pretty good picture of who they are and what their abilities are. If you perchance performed weakly in one particular area in a way that doesn't describe your gifts accurately, chances are that the other criteria they look at will show a disparity. Or, you will improve yourself in that area by trying again and doing better.

    Certainly, improving your score in one area doesn't change who you are--it proves who you are and the potential you have.

    Perhaps if you were the head of the AMA or AOA you could change this procedure, but I'm guessing that they wouldn't give you that position either just because you "thought you could be good at it."
     
  18. PimplePopperMD

    PimplePopperMD Senior Member

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    A person doesn't change, that's ridiculous. However, one of the "predictor" values of the MCAT is ability to take a test, and ability to study for it. This beast of an exam ISN'T like the SAT, in that one must have the science background, and really must have studied.

    The applicant hasn't become a better person when her scores improve. She has become a better APPLICANT because she has proven herself on an academic plane, and has demonstrated her ability to succeed in medical school (tenuous statement, but the correlation DOES exist). Your same logic could be applied like so: do four D's in Organic Chem and Physics make me a worse person? NO! But they most certainly make me a worse APPLICANT! Even if I can succeed in medical school, I have to prove that I am able to work, and succeed in undergrad courses.

    Sure, the MCAT is imperfect as a tool. So is gpa. Name the perfect tool, and forget med school! Just patent it, and you'll beome a billionaire.
     
  19. mj

    mj Senior Member

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    Calvingrad,

    At 9 I would hope someone would make the decision for me as to whether or not I should advance. At 29, when I am a paying customer, I am old enough to make my own decisions on my abilities.

    No one is saying educational standards should be lowered. In fact, I think I have argued that by getting rid of the admission hoops, EDUCATIONAL standards could and should be increased, as med schools would not feel pressure to pass people undeservingly merely to justify their admission standards.

    Nor have I argued that hard work will get you everywhere. What I have argued is that everyone has a right to fail, especially at public institutions that are supported by "we the people". For private schools, I suppose you could successfully argue for standards. But you CAN'T argue that having standards supports capitalism. That's just illogical.

    The BEST measure of whether or not someone will succeed or fail is to let them try. Sorry PPMD, but your perfect tool is absolutely free...well, at least to the school.

    mj
     
  20. calvingrad

    calvingrad New Member

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    MJ,

    I guess I'm just failing to see how lowering standards in one area (admissions) would raise standards in another (education). I'm curious if you think undergraduate colleges and universities should also do away with admissions standards? Should there be hoops to go through (boards) to become a doctor at the end of your education or should you also have to "prove" yourself by practicing and either succeeding or failing? If you do not have reasons to do away with the above requirements to move to the next level, so to speak, how do you justify making admission to medical school the exception?

    I didn't mean to imply that schools should make admission difficult with only the resulting prestige that would follow being a scarce resource. Surely that lacks integrity. But it's my opinion that having few or no admissions standards lacks integrity too. Unfortunately, if you want to go into a profession that requires you be very intelligent, motivated, verbally skilled, and generally service oriented you are required to show that you have these qualities to some degree up until the point when you desire to enter the profession through beginning the education. Otherwise, what is the point?

    If you were asking for a loan, the bank would first check to see if you were the type of person that would and could repay the loan--and this would be based on the things you had done financially up until that point and the potential they saw of what you could repay in the future. If they lowered their standards and gave the loan to everyone, wouldn't things deteriorate quite quickly? They would consequently have to lower their expectations of how much money they would receive back from each recipient, or they'd have to realize that it was an unwise choice to lower standards in the first place. How much more shouldn't medical schools be cautious about who is going to potentially become a doctor--after all, it will be human lives they will be helping or hurting.

    You are right when you say everyone has the right to [try]--but I think that is why anyone can *apply* to medical school but not why everyone has the opportunity to get in. In fact, you can even try several times (and fail several times) and they still will give you the opportunity to apply. I think it is a necessary element of cultivating good doctors to be concerned if a person has shown few of the qualities of a good doctor prior to admission. And if you are the person who has lacked the expression of those qualities, then it is nice to know that you have many opportunities to show that you do prior to jumping into a lengthy educational process.

    Might I hypothesize that you perhaps would have liked (or would like) the admissions standards diminished when it came to your own admission, seeing yourself as having the potential to be a very good doctor but lacking some of the criteria for entrance? I think that feeling is probably resounding for a lot of people on the list. But to say that it should be the case for *everyone* isn't really feasible, let alone good thinking. (In the same way, there might be occasions where it seems like lying would be the best way you could handle a situation, but if we made lying ok for everyone in every situation, that would not be a good thing...)

     
  21. reed0104

    reed0104 Senior Member

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    Mcat and GPA weed people for scholastic apptitude.

    The interview weeds for personality disorders.

    Capitalism and admissions have nothing to do with each other. What are you guys talking about?

     
  22. ADRIANSHOE

    ADRIANSHOE Senior Member

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    uh, yes they do...schools are designed to make money, physicians go to school to make money, our society used to be a capitalistic one and in fact became a major economic and military power for this sole reason....capitalism and competition are important cornerstones for our society, restricting competetion and restricting a person's ability to test themselves degrades the cornerstones of our society. Setting up PHONY admissions criteria such as the MCAT and the GPA and then even moreso the INTERVIEW is a poor substitute for setting up hardy challenges for the students and letting their own TRUE abilities weed themselves out.
    DO YOU REALLY BELIEVE all those schools posting their average MCAT scores? do the math. IF all 100 odd schools had their average entrants in the 30 range someone somewhere is lying about the statistics of the test: dont believe me? look at the NUMBER of testers, the number of people accepted, the percentile rank that each MCAT point represents and you will quickly see that somebody or bodies is lying.
    DO you really believe the admissions process has ANYTHING to do with YOUR PERSONALITY and nothing to do with YOUR status as the child of an alum or an instate resident or some other nebulous criterion?
    Besides, at some schools the MCAT isn't even the criteria nor is the GPA apparently...back when i was checking out the schools i recall an eastern north carolina institution whose MCAT score range was from 3-11...that's right someone got in with a 3. At mississippi, the GPA accepted for entrance was 2.4...so you see, GPA and MCAT are only tools to tell YOU why you didnt get in, not tools to evaluate your entrance...there is a difference.
     
  23. PimplePopperMD

    PimplePopperMD Senior Member

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    I don't know of a medical school that is in the black. Given the faculty:student ratios of the allopathic schools I've seen, and the amount of money they LOSE every year, it's a wonder they survive. They get by with a little help from their friends. Like NIH.
     
  24. mj

    mj Senior Member

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    Calvingrad,

    The point has been made on this and other threads that med students are often allowed to cheat or are given special dispensations for low academic performance. Why do you think this is? Well, if I'm touting my admission standards, I can't very well turn around and say "oops we goofed with that one", can I? When you aren't trying to justify admission standards with a high pass rate, you can better elevate educational standards. The mentality seems to be, "well I let you in, now I have to pass you"

    Yes, I would be in favor of eliminating admissions requirements at undergrad public universities.

    Your argument makes the assumption that everyone who is "very intelligent, motivated, verbally skilled, and generally service oriented" or "has shown few of the qualities of a good doctor prior to admission" gets in. We all know that isn't true. Many people who would make fine doctors get passed over by fairly subjective admissions criteria as Adrianshoe pointed out in the above post.

    If med schools are so concerned about who potentially becomes a doctor, make the educational standards with in the institution irreproachable. The difference between licensing and education is the difference between practice and pursuit. Everyone should have the right to pursue knowledge. Only those who demonstrate they have done so favorably should have the right to practice said knowledge.

    As for your hypothesis, my stats. are fine, and I think it is perfectly "good thinking" to believe that the only TRUE way one can judge whether or not someone can cut med school is to throw them in and let them sink or swim.

     
  25. ADRIANSHOE

    ADRIANSHOE Senior Member

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    pimplepopper, i was hoping someone would step into that one...A school being in the black isnt RELEVANT, although you are incorrect as many schools are in the black.
    Its NOT the schools that are in it for the money..its the persons setting up the school orporations and taking government funds and students tuitions to pay themselves and their cronies and their children six figure salaries...there is plenty of money to be made in this arena....the actual institution making money isnt relevant, since you simply set up the corporation r to leverage yourself into a sum zero balance sheet, one of the great scams in the world is the not for profit institution....do you know what the CEO of the salvation army makes per annum?...whether the salvation army is in the red or black isn't an issue.
    perhaps you are confusing schools with teaching hospitals?
     
  26. reed0104

    reed0104 Senior Member

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    A-shoe

    Competition and capitalism are not synonomous. There is competition in communist countries for many jobs/sports/research. Your arguement is thin and your reasoning is scattered.

    I really don't think the MCAT and admission process is the end all be all, but you need to pass boards. If anyone has a better idea to assure a decent knowedge base I would like to hear it.


    I agree with the tide
     
  27. RollTide

    RollTide Senior Member

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    MJ and John,

    Boy, you guys are really out in left field on this one. I somtimes wonder if you are just arguing for the sake of arguing.

    MJ,

    Please explain this to me, if there were no admissions standards for entrance into medical school, how do you keep every SINGLE applicant from choosing to go to Harvard? What if all 44,000 applicants decided they wanted to go to Harvard? Afterall, a degree from Harvard will bring a greater income, and the faculty will be the cream of the crop in their specialty. How does Harvard accomadate 44,000 students when they only have the resources for 150?

    I also wonder if you and John's fantasy of standard-free admissions should be extended to residency matching. Afterall, the residency is rating you based on your GPA, a standardized test, an interview, and letters of rec. Sound familiar? Maybe we should also extend this to the job market as well. No need for that college degree, or an interview even, they are such subjective criteria to choose an employee, we should just give the job to anyone who will take it. And after we waste our resources to train this individual, we can then truely gauge their competentcy for the position. What are you guys thinking?
     
  28. ADRIANSHOE

    ADRIANSHOE Senior Member

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    your assumptions outweigh your logic.

    to keep it short:
    i will only speak to your first paragraph as that sums up your depth of thought on this.

    DID ANYONE SAY THAT HARVARD SHOULD HAVE OPEN ADMISSIONS?????

    this problem is SO solvable it astonishes me that you couldnt come up with a solution to your own query in the same amount of time it took you to write your post.
     
  29. mj

    mj Senior Member

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    Careful Shoe, you might be accused of being argumentative, since after all, you don?t really believe what you post, but merely post to argue with Rolltide.

    You know what I really don?t understand, though, Shoe? You and Rolltide go back a long way now so maybe you can explain it to me. How can someone who purports to believe in something seemingly lack a base understanding of its mechanisms? He says ?I am a capitalist? but then seems to lack the basic understanding of what forces drive a free market economy. When he says he understands capitalism does really get concepts like supply, demand, quality and price?

    Also, in your experience, does he actually read the post he responds to? I?m inclined to say no, because if he did he would realize the line between the attainment of knowledge and practice of knowledge was clearly delineated. Yet he post this whole residency thing, not even responding to it.

    Maybe he?s right, though, and I should just take my ball and go home, freeing the Rolltides of the world from arguing disenting views on a public forum. Heaven forbid, he have to support his points with logic.

    mj
     
  30. ADRIANSHOE

    ADRIANSHOE Senior Member

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    mj, what i always remind my self of is that in platos discourses he is not REALLY talking to the other person, but using that other persons naivette to make his own points. As a FOIL, he has some marginal use.
     
  31. skippytoo

    skippytoo Junior Member

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    HEY ADRIANSHOE!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
    Which schools were these in North Carolina and Mississippi that had such low requirements??????????????????????????????
     
  32. skippytoo

    skippytoo Junior Member

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    HEY ADRIANSHOE!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
    Which schools were these in North Carolina and Mississippi that had such low requirements??????????????????????????????
     
  33. ADRIANSHOE

    ADRIANSHOE Senior Member

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    Eastern Carolina for one...look up the other one after you have verified the truth of this post.
     
  34. ADRIANSHOE

    ADRIANSHOE Senior Member

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    Eastern Carolina for one...look up the other one after you have verified the truth of this post. There arent that many schools in mississippi now are there?
     
  35. skippytoo

    skippytoo Junior Member

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    HEY ADRIANSHOE!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
    I agree with what you say about average MCAT scores posted by colleges and the politics of it all, but you have to tell me, which schools in North Carolina and Mississippi had such low entrance requirements?
     
  36. ADRIANSHOE

    ADRIANSHOE Senior Member

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    East Carolina University
    and the only medical school that i am aware of in MISSISSIPPI.
    hope that was more clear.

    one small caveat: this was data from 1994-1995 when i was going through the application process.
     
  37. skippytoo

    skippytoo Junior Member

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    I agree with ADRIANSHOE 100% about the MCAT and GPA not always being what med schools go by and that the whole process, like everything else in the world, is political. But, I have to ask ADRIANSHOE --which schools did you apply to in North Carolina and Mississippi that had such low entrance requirements (A 3 on the MCAT?)????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????
     
  38. ADRIANSHOE

    ADRIANSHOE Senior Member

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    are you receiving any posts from this thread skippy? i already answered your question a couple of times...post with a YA MAN if you get this post.
     

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