1. Hey Guest! Check out the 3 MCAT Study Plan Options listed in the 'stickies' area at the top of the forums (BoomBoom, SN2ed, and MCATJelly). Let us know which you like best.

    Also, we now offer a MCAT Test-Prep Exhibitions Forum where you can ask questions directly from the test-prep services.
    Dismiss Notice
  2. Dismiss Notice
  3. Download free Tapatalk for iPhone or Tapatalk for Android for your phone and follow the SDN forums with push notifications.
    Dismiss Notice
Dismiss Notice
Visit Interview Feedback to view and submit interview information.

MCAT Prep Course, Should I or Shouldn't I?

Discussion in 'MCAT Discussions' started by MD-To Be, Jul 22, 2006.

  1. MD-To Be

    MD-To Be Member
    2+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Jul 20, 2006
    Messages:
    100
    Likes Received:
    0
    Status:
    Pre-Medical
    I am new to SDN and I am looking for some advice. I was recently accepted into the Wright State 2012 School of Medicine class to commence in 2008. I was accepted at the end of my sophomore year through the school's Early Assurance Program based on GPA (4.00) and my ACT score (28). As part of my acceptance I am required to take the MCAT but it dosen't matter what score I get because I only have to post a score; I can get a 15 and still retain my acceptance.

    My question is, is there any reason to still invest $1,700 in a Kaplan/Princeton Review classroom prep course even though my MCAT score dosen't matter any more? I know the number of scholarships are few for incoming medical student but is there any other reason to want to do really well on the MCAT since I know for sure that I want to go to WSU's SOM? Finally, if the prep course is not worth the money, what is the best independent study method/program/book(s) to use? I have heard a lot about ExamKrackers and Audio Osmosis but even the EK "course" is over $1,000.
     
  2. Note: SDN Members do not see this ad.

  3. Arsenic

    Arsenic posting from the future
    Physician Moderator Emeritus 10+ Year Member

    Joined:
    May 5, 2004
    Messages:
    14,657
    Likes Received:
    4
    Status:
    Attending Physician
    congrats!

    here's a thread we set up to help answer questions on the different prep methods:

    http://forums.studentdoctor.net/showthread.php?t=280445

    that thread will give you lots of info on the different prep methods. if i was you though i would just go with self prep and save the money.
     
  4. xanthomondo

    xanthomondo nom nom nom
    Removed Physician 10+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Apr 2, 2006
    Messages:
    15,650
    Likes Received:
    19
    Status:
    Resident [Any Field]
    i think the prep classes are overrated..you dont need them but i dont know, i never took one

    so youve gotten all As...did you learn the material or just simply jump through the hoops that your teachers have required?

    just do some reviewing and practice problems...some EK books, theyre like $25 each, you should be fine

    congrats with that hookup, and dont sweat the mcat at all because theres absolutely no reason to
     
  5. Pdiddy310

    Pdiddy310 Path = Fun
    5+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Nov 16, 2004
    Messages:
    87
    Likes Received:
    1
    Status:
    Medical Student
    congrats! I def. wouldn't waste my $ on an MCAT prep course. Just get some review books and you should be fine.
     
  6. MD-To Be

    MD-To Be Member
    2+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Jul 20, 2006
    Messages:
    100
    Likes Received:
    0
    Status:
    Pre-Medical

    I would like to think that the fact that I got all A's reflects that I actually know the material and didn't just jump through the hoops although one could get an A without ever truly learning anything or learning how to learn as it were. Thanks for the input.
     
  7. MD-To Be

    MD-To Be Member
    2+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Jul 20, 2006
    Messages:
    100
    Likes Received:
    0
    Status:
    Pre-Medical
    What would you recommend as the best review books though? Thanks.
     
  8. kdburton

    kdburton Ulnar Deviant
    5+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Sep 3, 2005
    Messages:
    1,978
    Likes Received:
    4
    Status:
    Resident [Any Field]

    I know a guy who was in the "premed scholars program" at my school which sounds like the equivalent program at your school that ended up turning down his acceptance in order to matriculate at another school that he found out he wanted to go to more. He was almost sure at your age that he wanted to attend his current university's medical school, but then when he got into the summer after his Jr year and realized that he had more options available he elected to take another option. With that said he had to take the MCAT and do well on it in order to be admitted to that other school
     
  9. shantster

    shantster Eye protection!
    10+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Feb 10, 2005
    Messages:
    2,472
    Likes Received:
    0
    Status:
    Resident [Any Field]
    If it doesn't matter what score you get, why are you studying for the MCAT at all?
     
  10. BXP

    BXP Member
    5+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Jun 26, 2006
    Messages:
    85
    Likes Received:
    0
    Status:
    Pre-Medical
    Completely 100% agree with this person. There is absolutely no reason you should not try hard to get a good score on the MCATs because to settle for a crappy score will SEVERELY limit your choices in the future. And through your 4 years in undergrad, many things will influence you. Maybe you are sure that you want to go straight into their med program right now, but that may or may not change 2 years down the line. Most of the kiddies at my school who are accepted into the Bacc/MD program use it as a backup option while applying to other top-rated programs. I see no reason why this shouldn't also be the case for you.

    Congrats on the acceptance into their continuation program, it is definitely a relaxing thing to know that you have a backup option available.

    On the note of prep courses...

    I am taking TPR and it's very good, the materials they give you are exactly what you need to study, no more no less (give or take a few topics since the MCAT is very random).

    But I am also doing EK books at the same time to ensure that I get another perspective and extra problems.

    I definitely recommend a review course if it's an option.
     
  11. chaeymaey

    chaeymaey 1K Member
    10+ Year Member

    Joined:
    May 25, 2003
    Messages:
    1,589
    Likes Received:
    2
    Status:
    Fellow [Any Field]
    I recommend a prep class, particularly TPR. I really needed someone to teach me the material, and I like how they have different teachers for every subject that are experts in their own subject.
     
  12. shook33

    shook33 Member
    2+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Jun 1, 2006
    Messages:
    58
    Likes Received:
    0
    Status:
    Pre-Medical

    You can surely get all As and not retain anything its called crash studying. for example if you have an exam in a week and you dont sleep for a few days before it and just study all day. about 2 weeks after your exam you will have forgotten most of the material. especially in ORGO! im not saying its right but it happens!
     
  13. Broccoli

    Broccoli Senior Member
    2+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Jul 3, 2006
    Messages:
    195
    Likes Received:
    1
    Status:
    Pre-Medical
    I think you should really study for the MCAT and try to do your best, even if you already have a spot in med school. I don't think taking a prep course is necessary if you feel like you understand the material and just need a review. I would recommend the EK books.
     
  14. bluenumber6

    bluenumber6 Member
    5+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Jun 23, 2006
    Messages:
    36
    Likes Received:
    0
    Status:
    Pre-Medical

    Hey can you tell me about this early acceptance program? i got a younger brother who might be interested. what is it called? and how do you apply?
     
  15. chewsnuffles

    chewsnuffles is a series of tubes
    2+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Apr 9, 2006
    Messages:
    456
    Likes Received:
    1
    MDApps:
    Status:
    Pre-Medical
    If you're a good test taker and take all the med school pre-req's and are concientous about prepping for the test through classes, you can get a 30 w/o actually studying for the MCAT. I was a B average and still got a 31 w/o studying on the first test (it was 3R though... so probably more like a 29 realistically)
     
  16. MD-To Be

    MD-To Be Member
    2+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Jul 20, 2006
    Messages:
    100
    Likes Received:
    0
    Status:
    Pre-Medical
    The program is called the Early Assurance Program. Every year the WSU SOM allows and undergraduate sophomore students from Wright State, University of Dayton, Wilberfore and Wittenberg to apply for conditional early acceptance to the SOM. To apply a student must have a high GPA (at least over a 3.5), an ACT of at least 28 or higher, and have completed a year of inorganic chemistry, organic chemistry, and a year of biology.

    Upon applying every student who applies is invited for an interview at the SOM very similar to the interview process any pre-med student would go through if they were applying at the normal time. On average 4-6 people apply and 90% are accepted. I HIGHLY encourage your brother to apply because if he meets those criteria then he has a GREAT chance of getting accepted because this year they accepted all of the students into the program (which is the best chance a student will ever have to get into medical school because the odds are in ones favor at 90% acceptance instead of 3% acceptance when applying through the normal route).

    The acceptance is conditional though and the students must complete three things to be accepted: 1) maintain a quateraly undergrad GPA of 3.2 (which should not be difficult if one wants to get into medical school), 2) take the MCAT and "post" a score (what score you get dosen't matter), and 3) finish all other pre-req classes. If a student meets those criteria affter being granted conditional acceptance that matriculate post undergrad graduation to WSU's SOM.

    It is a great program and other schools (Tufts, Penn State, and Georgetown to name a few) offer similar programs. It allows me to not have to worry about what classes I take any longer and actually enjoy my undergrad experience which is a novel concept for a pre-med student.

    The web-site for WSU SOM's early assurance program is: http://www.med.wright.edu/eap/
    and you can find similar programs from other schools on-line by typring "early assurance program" into google.
     
  17. WilliamsF1

    2+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Jul 6, 2006
    Messages:
    8,469
    Likes Received:
    1
    Status:
    Pre-Health (Field Undecided)
    Did any of you guys honestly start studying 1-2 weeks before an exam?!?!? The earliest I had ever started to study was 5 days before an exam, and that was for Biochem. Mostly due to the amount of material. Orgo could be done 2 days before the exam...If I ever tried to study sooner, I would just lose all the info.

    As far as reviews for the OP, I say don't waste your money on the courses. Buy a review book and spend a month before the MCAT going over it. Since you already got in, you wouldn't be nervous like the rest of the test takes. :laugh:

    UF has a similar program except you don't have to take the MCAT at all. I think only 7 students get admitted every year. You never get you bachelors, but the entire program lasts 7 years from the time you left high school (of course it doesn't start the fall after you graduate high school). It's really tough to get in. You need to have scored 1500+ on SAT. Firstly, I didn't have that score, second, I wanted my BS, which I just got. Lastly, I'm not sure I wanted to stay at the same school for 7 years.
     
  18. Pdiddy310

    Pdiddy310 Path = Fun
    5+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Nov 16, 2004
    Messages:
    87
    Likes Received:
    1
    Status:
    Medical Student
    I went through the Kaplan review book and found it to be meh. I got some of the examkracker books and really like those. With that being said, each book has their own mistakes so if you aren't conscious of the material already, then you might fall for them. With that being said, I don't think a small mistake here or there will seriously hinder your prep.

    On a side note, knowing your biochemistry really comes in handy for the BS of the exam. For a quick but concise review of biochemistry, I recommend Lippincott's Illustrated Review Biochemistry 3rd edition. Good luck!
     

Share This Page