MCAT statistics for april 2001

Discussion in 'Pre-Medical - MD' started by Epi, Jul 29, 2001.

  1. Epi

    Epi Fuzzy Tiger

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    Hi everybody.
    I was just wondering if anybody knows the number of people scoring in the ranges of 30-35, 35-40, and 40+ for april 2001. I've seen the distribution for each individual category, but it doesn't tell the distributionn of the total scores. Is the distribution usually similiar year after year?
     
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  3. kreno

    kreno Candy Man

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    Hey, where can I find out the distributions for the april test - the one you're refering to epogen?
     
  4. Epi

    Epi Fuzzy Tiger

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    Those individual statistics come with your score if you've taken the april 2001. Ask someone who took the april 2001 to tell you, otherwise I don't know how else you can get that info.
     
  5. cm7b5

    cm7b5 Senior Member

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    You can't find that information, and it is not statistically prudent to try to average percentiles and try any other weird manipulations. I am under the impression that 30 puts one in the top 15 percent and 35 and up easily in the top 5%.
     
  6. jephyboy

    jephyboy Senior Member

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    The tests score 'should' be consistent from year to year. This is the only way that the MCAT can work to determine how you compare to other students. There should be a bell curve between the scores. The bulk of the students will score 8-9 or so, and will decrease significantly by each point in either direction. Usually, when you get into the 13+ range, it becomes statistically impossible to deferieniate, because of the low sample size.

    So, in summary: The scores are almost always similar from a couple of years past, because of the way the test is set up. This makes sure that a person that scores a 9 on all of the sections will score the same score, if they didn't do anything significantly different in studying. That way, the schools can use the scores to compare with other students. Hope this helps. I'm not even sure if I answered your question. I guess, I didn't: the percentage of people scoring 13+ should be single digits; 11-12 should be high single digits, 10 should be double digits and 8-9 should be higher double digits, and then decreasing in likewise fashion for the lower scores.
     

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