MCAT Verbal Question!!!~~~

Discussion in 'Medical Students - MD' started by Matrix, Oct 15, 2000.

  1. Matrix

    Matrix Member

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    Hi all!!~~~

    Ok, here's my question. my professors + advisors told me that to increase my MCAT scores on any section; practice! practice! practice!!!! doing MCAT questions + go back to the questions that i got wrong and study them by going through old lecture notes, or find out why i got it wrong by looking at the explanation in the answer section.
    Now, for Bio + Phys sci sections, this method kind of works for me. When i get a question wrong, i know why i got it wrong + it helps in the future practice questions because i can see which information i was lacking when i read the answer section. For example, i'll know i got #7 wrong because i was lacking information on protein synthesis. Next time when a bio question related to protein synth pops up, i would have already studied + know detailed info about protein synth and get that question right.
    The verbal section is a different story. No matter how many times i analyze that passage or know the reason why i got a question wrong, it still won't help in the future practice exams because the chances for a similar passage or info coming up on the verbal section ... 0 .... will it help if i analyze + read the answer keys in detail about a passage about the French revolution for my future verbal practice MCAT ... not for me ..
    i know some of the tactics about how to approach the verbal section, for example, start with the passage that you're most confident with ..etc ... but how can you 'actually' review or study the questions that you got wrong so that you won't make the same mistake in the future?? .... is there a point in going back to the questions that i got wrong and analyze the entire passage again + try to figure out why i got the question wrong??? (for the science sections, i think this method works pretty well because while you're doing this, you get to pick up so much more information that you may have forgotten or just didn't know about)
    or shall i just continue doing verbal passages, analyze what i got wrong using the description from the answer keys, so that oneday, something will just 'click'???
    is there any other way of studying for this section other than continously doing the verbal practice questions + read Times, JAMA, The Economist, The NYT etc everyday??
    English is my second language by the way and i just can't get a score higher than 6 on my practice verbal exams!
    help!!!~~~~
     
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  3. psi1467

    psi1467 Senior Member

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    Unfortunately, practicing for the verbal is exactly what seems to abhor you. You simply must increase your reading workload to improve your passage times. Likewise, I hammered out as many passages, and practice questions as possible. Believe it or not, if you go back and try to figure out why you got each one wrong it will help. There's no need to focus on a fact you may have overlooked. Moreso, you should start zeroing in on the styles of questions. You'll begin to see a pattern in MCAT verbal questions. There are a lot of inference based answers. So once you can get to the point where you simply are grasping the "themes" of the passages, that will hopefully improve your score. Maybe everyone else thinks I'm way off base, but I hope that will help.
     
  4. Methuselah

    Methuselah Senior Member

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    Matrix,
    I don't know if you took a prep course or not (Princeton, Kaplan etc.) but in addition to prioritizing the passages, they put a lot of stock in recognizing question 'types.' By recognizing the type of question they're asking, you can eliminate potential wrong answers. They also advocate summarizing the individual paragraphs in the margins as you read them, but I NEVER had time to do that. Many times, when I reviewed the explanations of why I got a question wrong, I thought the 'best' answer was extremely subjective, if not a steaming pile of b.s. One thing that might help is reading a lot, in particular, dense and obscure sociology text. It might get you used to sifting through the chaffe for what's important. Warning! Do not operate heavy machinery while doing this! Good Luck!
     
  5. Hirurg

    Hirurg Member

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    Here is the way I did it. Read a lot of hard texts eg. "Republic"-Plato, or "Theor. of Justice"-Rawls or for that matter other philosophical texts. Understand it, try resummarising and write a short description of each paragraph. Read "Atlanic", "Discover", JAMA, NEJM, etc.
    Do not stress out on the test, read for content not facts.
    Worked for me,
    Got 11 out of 12 this year.
    Good luck.
     
  6. Hirurg

    Hirurg Member

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    To add to the abpve
    English is my second language also.
    I have only spoken English for 8 years.
    Must be reading!
     

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