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MD/MPH

Discussion in 'Medical Students - MD' started by bereave, Nov 22, 2000.

  1. bereave

    bereave Junior Member

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    Dear All,

    I am currently a senior in college and plan to take the MCAT in April 2001. This, of course, means that I will have a year before I will enter medical school (granted I get accepted, of course). I have an interest in public health and am considering applying to MPH programs but found out that most MPH programs are 2-years-long for full-time students. Since I would not want to hinder my chances of being accepted to medical school, is it a good idea to pursue the MPH degree even if I will be putting the program "on hold" in lieu of medical school?

    Any responses will be greatly appreciated.

    bereave
     
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  3. Annette

    Annette gainfully employed
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    Do you really want an MPH, or are you doing it to improve your chances of getting into med school? Don't bother with an MPH if you are just trying to improve your chances.

    If you want an MPH, consider that some schools have 1 year programs for medical students, or those with medical training already. If you need to improve your transcript consider taking other classes in a non-degree/ student-at-large program.

    I took a two year MPH because I wanted the degree and to improve my transcript (which I was later told that I should have taken more science classes instead). I thoroughly enjoyed the two years, and was able to explore more areas than those in the one year program. You might consider delaying medschool two years instead of just the one.

    What ever you choose, good luck!
     
  4. Djanaba

    Djanaba Senior Member

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    Have you considered the combined degree programs that are out there, like the one at Tufts? More work, but if time is of the essence for you, this may be the way to go. The program is quite competitive but I hear very good things about it.
     
  5. Marie Suga

    Marie Suga New Member

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    I'm a first year in the MD/MPH program at Tufts and the good thing about the program there is that I can get both degrees in 4 years. Of course, that means extra work but I feel that it is worth it. There are also many programs that give you an MD/MPH in 5 years, which could also be a good way to go! So, if you are interested in public health, you don't have to put off your medical schools plans for it!
     
  6. fiatslug

    fiatslug Senior Member
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    If you're planning on applying for a 2 year MPH program, be advised that medical schools do not like to poach students in mid-degree from other grad programs--as I recall, most will require that you finish the grad program you're in before starting medical school.

    There are lots of things you could do (travel, become fluent in Spanish, work in a hospital, etc.) with a year off that would "look good" and also be fun (a concept with which many premeds are unfamiliar [​IMG])--and many medical schools offer MPH programs, if you're still interested in going that route.
     
  7. puffy1

    puffy1 Senior Member

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    There are a couple of one-year Master's program in the US. I think Boston U has one, and I know that Tulane has a one-year non-thesis Master's of Science program primarily for Tulane grads who want to enter into the health professions. I wouldn't doubt that Tulane takes a few non-TU grads for their program.

    I think you would be better off taking a year's worth of upper level science courses at your university. You'll improve upon your undergrad science GPA, which I think is more important than your grad GPA.

     
  8. VAD

    VAD Member

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    Marie,

    I have two quick questions for you.

    1. How much more work is the MD/MPH program? Is it manageable with the med school coursework (please provide details if possible).

    2. How much more expensive is the dual degree program than the regular MD program? I have searched high and low and I haven't been able to find the cost!

    Thanks in advance,
    VAD [​IMG]
     
  9. doctor jay

    doctor jay Member

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    I am currently finishing up an MPH in INternational Health (a one year program if you crank it out) and will be starting medical school in the fall. I sought the MPH because I wanted training in International Health. However, after nearly finishing the program I realize that an MPH is really a silly degree, especially if one has an advanced degree such as an MD or DO. I am at Loma Linda University which is supposed to be a top notch university and a very expensive one at that, yet most of what I have learned is practically common sense-certainly not worth the money I have invested.

    If you are seeking the MPH to improve your academic resume for medical school, here is what many others in the medical field have passed on to me. TAKE ADVANCED SCIENCE COURSES OR GO FOR A GRADUATE LEVEL BIOLOGICAL SCIENCE DEGREE! If you really want the MPH, plus you have good credentials to get into medical school, do the combined program. Even if your medical school does not offer the MPH, you can request a one year leave of absence to complete it elsewhere.

    My last piece of advice -- really research what you will be studying--especially the tools that you will be taught. Most of the science (which is relatively little in an MPH) you will get in your med school courses. The remaining material is often available in books (not textbooks) available at any bookstore. Definitely look for a program that is problem-based learning with a strong curriculum in field-based application, otherwise you might find yourself bored out of your mind and feeling like you are in the fifth grade writing tiresome book reports and article summaries!!!!!!

    Feel free to email me (check my profile) if you would like more discourse on the topic of MPH degrees or a list of some of the books used at LLU, etc.

    Good luck!!

    ------------------
    "Be wary when one says impossible, for it most likely means that they have just never seen it or done it before..."
     

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