MD/PhD

Discussion in 'Pre-Medical - MD' started by imtiaz, Jun 22, 2001.

  1. imtiaz

    imtiaz i cant translate stupid
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    Where is everyone that is applying MD/PhD for 2002 going to apply?

    My top programs are:

    UIUC Medical Scholars Program
    UNC Chapel Hill MD/PhD program (#1 in Analytical Chemistry nationwide)
    U of Iowa MD/PhD program

    I don't know of any others that offer the PhD in alternate fields (ie. Physio, Biochem, Anat etc.) Does anybody else know of programs that offer the PhD in Chemistry? Neuroscience is OK too.

    I'm also applying to the usual bunch of schools that I would attend regular MD, and pursue my PhD independently after I'm done. Like Rush, Loyola, etc.

    My friend in the MSP at UIUC says that research experience is the key to landing an interview and close look, how true this is I don't know. Any other admitted students want to vouch for that?
     
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  3. Hopkins2010

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    I'm applying to the following MD/PhD programs:

    Univ. Washington
    UIUC
    Johns Hopkins
    UPenn
    Michigan
    Ohio State

    My MCAT is low for MD/PhD (31R) but I thought I would give it a shot anyways since I dont want to have any regrets in the future about not at least trying.

    Out of those listed, UIUC definitely sounds like the coolest program for me. I really, really want to go there but I realize its a long shot. Its about the only MD/PhD program in the whole country that will allow you to get a PhD in any field you want to.

    I believe I have the research experience necessary, but its just a matter of getting past the MCAT hurdle I think.

    Good luck to all potential mudphuds out there.
     
  4. imtiaz

    imtiaz i cant translate stupid
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    I have the same MCAT (31M). I emailed the coordinator of the MSP, and he said he "encourages me to apply". Whatever that means. I told him I had a 2.8GPA and a 31 MCAT and he said although my numbers are below their average, that he still thinks I will be competetive based on my research experiences. I haven't done much, just two research experiences. One at the UIC College of Medicine in Reproductive Endo, and the other in the Department of Chemistry, which is where I'm starting my Masters this year. Good luck with your application, I'm sure you have a better GPA, which should help you out significantly. Me, I'M the long shot. :)
     
  5. imtiaz

    imtiaz i cant translate stupid
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    By the way, UNC Chapel Hill lets you get your PhD in anything you want to as well. But you have to explain to them how it relates to medicine.


     
  6. Hopkins2010

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    imitiaz,

    I wish you good luck with getting in somewhere. I wasnt aware that UNC-Chapel Hill had an MD-PhD program but perhaps I will look to see what they're about.

    I want to do biomedical engineering for the PhD, so that limits my list of schools a little bit.

    I think UIUC has a little bit less emphasis on the numbers compared to the other MD/PhD programs I'm looking at. It seems like on their website I remember their stated matriculant MCAT average is 32, so thats only one point above our scores, so perhaps our chances are better than I first thought. Most of the other MD/PhD programs that I've seen have a matriculant average MCAT score of around 34 or so.

    UIUC is not specifically an MSTP program as far as I know, since I gathered from their website that they dont get NIH funding. I'd still be happy there regardless.

    Hopefully your research experience at UIC med school will help you out. Good luck :D
     
  7. sophiababe

    sophiababe New Member

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    Does JHU and Harvard have MD/PHD. I have a 42 AND 4.0 and would like to go to the best medical school. What is the best?
     
  8. mr_sparkle

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    Baylor21,

    I was on the application circuit a few years ago, so take my advice with a pinch of salt. Things may changed since I visited the Urbana-Champagne. UIUC is a good school, but the MSP program has disadvantages from being being non-MSTP. Although you can pursue the PhD in any department, it also leaves you dependent on that dept for financial support. Many of the MD/PhD students were TA-ing throughout their entire PhD. Teaching is fun once in a while, but it can be a serious time drain when you need to complete a thesis. The students I met were happy with the program, but a couple took me aside and said, "stick with NIH funded programs". Your experience there will be strongly influenced by your home department.

    Imtiaz,

    By the way, I really liked the U Iowa. They have a packed MD/PhD interview schedule with dinner banquets, hanging out at the director's home, etc. Only UT-Southwestern is more fun (but they took us clubbing on school's tab). They take all the applicants out in a fleet of U Iowa Navigators- from the airport, to dinner, etc. Dr. Guyer works very hard at recruiting students. If you're a fan of japanese animation, be sure to stop by the comic book store across the street from the Holiday Inn. They have a great collection of stuff (and I'm from NY).

    mr_sparkle
     
  9. Popoy

    Popoy SDN Super Moderator
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    sophiababe.... the best medical school... "Is the one you're going to...."

    I took that quote from someone in a different thread.

    If you're really into that whole ranking thing, which many think is a bunch of crud, then look into USNews otherwise any school is good....

    I see with your numbers, I'm sure you won't have any problem getting.... Good luck and WELCOME TO SDN!!! :cool:
     
  10. Hopkins2010

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    mr_sparkle,

    I realize that a non NIH funded (non MSTP) program is not as good financially as an MSTP program. However, all of the MSTP programs that I've looked support research in only classical disciplines like biochemistry, immunology, molecular biology, etc so thats why I'm seriously considering UIUC. Most of my research has been in the area of biomedical engineering so I think that puts me at a disadvantage for MSTP programs that sponsor research in areas like those listed above.

    sophia,

    You are getting too hung up on which school is the best. JHU and Harvard are both top notch programs and you should feel greatful if you are able to get admitted to either one. Both programs have MD/PhD programs. I believe the Harvard MD/PhD is a combination program between MIT and Harvard. But I'm not quite sure.
     
  11. imtiaz

    imtiaz i cant translate stupid
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    Harvard has two tracks for MD/PhD. One is more "traditional" and the other is in conjunction with MIT, and is more engineering-oriented. I'm not applying to either one, obviously.

    About MSP, yes, you will have to TA if you choose to pursue a PhD in an alternate field. They don't rely on NIH funding because they don't NEED to. All students who complete a PhD in Chemistry are required to TA. It's a part of the training. I realize that this will be a bit more to do in addition to research, but every PhD student has to do it, not just me. TA'ing is a part of getting a PhD in any basic science. It comes with the package. I've never heard of someone getting a doctorate in a basic science without any TA experience. It's unheard of. You NEED that experience, for speaking at seminars, teaching classes, etc. Why would you not want it? Unless you were planning not to fully utlize your PhD after you earned it.

    U of Iowa is a good school. It's not at the top of my list, but heck, I'll go if I get in. They have a nice Neuroscience program. It's not chemistry, but it's what I want to use chemistry for. Different means to the same end I suppose.

    All in all, UIUC is my top program. I visited there a few times, and the Chemistry department is in the top 5 nationwide. The professor I work for now got his PhD from there. So his recommendation should count for something.

    Good luck to everyone who's giving it a shot.
     
  12. mr_sparkle

    mr_sparkle Member
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    imtiaz,

    I'm pointing out there's a difference between having to TA for a semester versus having to TA for 4 years. From my own experience, it steals valuable time away from completing your PhD and moving on to clerkships. Regardless, your graduate support tends to flow from your PI's grant. It all depends on how many R01 grants your mentor has. UIUC's chem dept is well funded, so this would be a moot point for you.

    You should consider that many professors pursue chemistry, biomedical engineering research while holding an academic appointment in traditional depts. For example, Micheal Phelps, who invented the PET scanner, is the chair of pharmacology at UCLA. Although most of his students' work is actually in radiology and engineering, but their PhD remains from the dept of pharmacology. It's merely a suggestion to broaden your options when applying.
     
  13. imtiaz

    imtiaz i cant translate stupid
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    Mr_Sparkle,

    I didn't mean to undermine the efficacy of traditional medically related fields such as pharmacology and the rest of that lot. I merely meant to point out the advantages of TAing. At UIUC, in the chemistry department, regarless of how rich your PI is, you are required to TA for one and one half year (3 semesters).

    Sure, TAing will slow you down, no question about that. No arguments there. I beleive it's a valuable experience. But hey, you're more experienced than me. So I beleive you.

    I agree with you that a lot of research is becoming interdisciplinary nowadays. It's merely a matter of preference I suppose. It all ends up in the mix anyway.
     
  14. biophysicbadass

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    Baylor,
    Hvae you thought about UCLA? You can do your PhD in biomedical physics and its NIH supported. The name of the program is somewhat of a misnomer, because its essentially medical engineering. Don't know if you've looked into that or not, but it might suit your needs.
     
  15. ckent

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    I am surprised to see a thread about MD/PhD programs and see that no one has mentioned Washington University in St. Louis. It has the largest MD/PhD program, and it is considered number one in the nation for MD/PhD by many in academics. I know of people turning down Harvard's program to go to Wash U's program. I don't go, but if you are MD/PhD, I would encourage you to look into it.
     
  16. Vader

    Vader Dark Lord of the Sith
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    To sophia (and others applying):
    I would go into the process open minded and apply to a variety of schools. MD/PhD admissions are even more of a crapshoot than regular medical school. There are people with very, very high qualifications that did not get into Harvard or JHU's MD/PhD programs when I was applying. Don't get set on just one or two schools because you never know where exactly you'll end up. In addition, considering other programs may be to your advantage in comparing schools and doing what is affectionately known as "shopping." :) You'll find that each of the various programs has its own unique flavor and personality. You may find that you fit in better at a place like WashU (like the previous poster mentioned), or another school. Remember, you will be spending an average of 7-8 years wherever you choose to go, so it is often wise to take into account where you'll be happy living. There are also many other factors to take into account such as strength of your area of research, time to graduation, integration of the MD and PhD phases, etc. You'll want to carefully consider all your options.
     
  17. groundhog

    groundhog 1K Member
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    The President's Medalist from the University of Washington class of 2001 has opted for the MD/PHD program at Washington University in St Louis.
     
  18. imtiaz

    imtiaz i cant translate stupid
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    I think the main reason that the "big name" MD/PhD programs haven't been mentioned on this thread are that I originally asked for alternative programs that allowed the freedom to get a PhD in anything.

    I don't stand a chance at a regular MD/PhD program. They accept anywhere from 1-5 students and offer degrees that are in fields that don't interest me in particular. Ideally, I want to get into something like the MSP, which enrolls a large class (they have a list, in fact at http://www-admin.med.uiuc.edu/msp/), and offers the PhD in any field that you choose.

    I'm still looking for other large programs that give you a similar option. If anybody knows of any, let me know.
     
  19. Hopkins2010

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    I'm with you on this imtiaz. Even if the MSP doesnt have as good a financial setup as the MSTP programs its still my first choice MD/PhD program.

    Somebody posted on another thread that Washington Univ. accepts about 20-25 MSTP applicants every year, but thats an anomaly compared to the vast majority of MSTP that I've looked at.

    God forbid I could never get admitted into the same program that the President's Medalist from UW got accepted to :rolleyes:
     
  20. Vader

    Vader Dark Lord of the Sith
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    MSTP class sizes vary, but probably average around 10-12 spots per class. Most programs accept many more applicants, however, to fill their spots. If you get several interviews, chances are that you will get in somewhere because schools are really competing for the same small group of applicants. Don't sell yourself short. You do not have to be the president's medalist or whatever. But you definitely want to make yourself stand out, especially for the best programs. MSTP programs have to meet certain requirements set by the NIH to receive their funding. Thus, if you get into one of these programs, you will receive an excellent medical and scientific education regardless of where you end up. Many programs offer alternative PhDs. For example, I met an MSTP at UCSD doing his PhD in anthropology. You have to check with schools to see in which subject areas PhDs are offered. Some programs actually encourage students interested to pursue a PhD in a subject outside of biomedical research. Other MD/PhD programs may be more flexible. The point is to apply to variety of schools and don't sell yourself short. I never thought I'd get into UCSF's MSTP or other ones, but I somehow managed to do so. A lot of it is in the way you present yourself and the quality of your recommendations. Good luck!!
     
  21. Seal

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    I agree with Vader completely (as usual
    :) )--don't sell yourself short. Yes, groundhog, this is the second or third time that you mentioned the president's medalist at UW attending Wash U. This statistic should scare the hell out of everybody else who is not a president's medalist and who has less-than-perfect creditials, right? To the contrary, it shouldn't. I also got accepted to the MD/PhD program at Wash U., and I'm a non-medalist at Podunk state university. I was told by PROFESSORS and fellow students that my stats weren't high enough and that I shouldn't bother applying. But I did, and am I glad I did... because I will be attending Wash U. as a part of a program I think is perfect for me. The point is, you never know if you will get in unless you try. So try your best, pick the programs most suitable to you (I liked the MSP a lot too, by the way) and hopefully you guys will be the ones giving out advice next year. Best of luck!!
     
  22. imtiaz

    imtiaz i cant translate stupid
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    While I don't want to sell myself short, I also know (having been through this process last year) that it's a big savings of time and money if you only bite off as much as you can chew. Last year my application method was way off, I ended up wasting $900 because I didn't send back 20/28 secondaries. This year, that's not going to happen. I have a few select programs that I really like, and that are realistically within my range, provided that the admissions comittee is willing to look down at the lower end of the applicant pool.

    I don't know how it is going to work out, but I'll tell you this much. I'm not going down without a fight this year! :p

    Good luck to everyone.
     
  23. groundhog

    groundhog 1K Member
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    Whoa, time out Seal,
    I hope you don't consider me to be some sort of snob or think that I was trying to discourage anyone. I'm a UW alum and just happened to go commencement this year because my daughter was getting her BA. The President's Medalist got to speak at the commencement and it was stated at her introduction that she was going on to the MD/PHD program at Washington U. I don't know her, but she seemed like a real nice down to earth person. I'm sure that you will get to meet her. I was just trying to add conversation to this thread.

    P.S. I wish you, her, and your peers all the best. I know you have all worked hard to get where you are at.
     
  24. Seal

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    Sorry, groundhog--I didn't mean to insinuate that you are a snob or anything. I'm really looking to meeting all of my classmates next year.

    By the way, congrats to your daughter!
     
  25. Hopkins2010

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    You mean I dont need to be the President's Medalist to get into an MD/PhD??? Wow, I thought that was basically a requirement.

    groundhog,

    All kidding aside, I'm sure she is an excellent applicant. I wasnt mocking her credentials, as she should definitely be proud of it. I'm sure its very difficult to obtain. I just thought it was funny the way you mentioned it, kinda like a high proclamation from a throne or something :D
     
  26. SocialistMD

    SocialistMD Resident Objectivist
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    imtiaz and baylor21-
    Just to point out something you guys might not have noticed about UIUC; it is an illinois state school (actually, I am sure you both knew it was a state school, I just think you may be overlooking what that means in terms of acceptance). That helps you, imtiaz (which may be one of the reasons they encouraged your application), but not you, baylor21.
     
  27. Hopkins2010

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    I looked at this issue with all of the MD/PhD programs I'm applying to. For UIUC's case, you are correct in that the medical school favors Illinois state residents.

    However, IF the UIUC MD/PhD committee recommends someone for admission to the medical school, then the medical school evaluates the applicant without regard to state residency status. The MD/PhD committee itself does not consider residency status from what I understand.

    I think its a similar situation for alot of MD/PhD programs that operate at public medical schools. Even the Univ of Washington's program (whose regular MD program is notorious for not accepting out of staters) has stated that their MD/PhD program does not regard residency status.
     
  28. SocialistMD

    SocialistMD Resident Objectivist
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    All I was trying to point out was the fact that applying to the MD/PhD program may have been recommended to imtiaz based on the fact that he is an Illinois resident. I do not think you should hastily (not that you were) base your decision on applying there because of what he was told.
    I know most schools are "blind" to residency status in terms of MD/PhD programs, but I still think the recommendation may have come in part due to the fact that he is an Illinois resident in addition to other qualifications rather than just on the other qualifications alone.
     
  29. imtiaz

    imtiaz i cant translate stupid
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    I think baylor21 is applying to the MSP because of the breadth of PhD choices available to him. Not because my application was encouraged.
     
  30. groundhog

    groundhog 1K Member
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    Baylor 21 and Seal,
    Hey any misunderstanding was my fault. Sometimes that can happen with written vs face to face communications. I appreciate how you could have construed my comment to be somewhat hoity-toity. I should have said: All you folks looking into an MD/PHD program really impress me. The UW President's Medalist for this year will enter a MD/PHD at Washington University. The fact that she chose such a course of study when she likely had other options speaks volumes to me about the high quality of the folks on this forum who are also considering going into a MD/PHD program. Good luck to all of you...truly.
     
  31. sbrandon

    sbrandon Junior Member
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    Gonna bring it back to the non-MSTP topic here.

    Baylor21 and Imitiaz (sp?) I am so glad to hear that you're considering UIUC!!! When I was applying last summer I had a tough time finding anyone "non-traditional" to chat with.

    I am very happy to say that I am done with the whole difficult, exhausting and somewhat random process. I'll be starting at UIUC in August (only 2 month - yikes!) in the Community Health department. Personally, I considered Dartmouth and UMDNJ to be schools at least somewhat open to non-traditional MD/PhD combinations.

    Many posters are correct that the MSTP programs do streamline things for you, allowing one to get two doctorates in 7 years. But there are a LOT of restrictions that go with the territory including area of study and what order you pursue your training - just to name a couple.

    You are both correct that MCATs of 31 might set you back a little, but UIUC is really looking for the whole package. Personality, motivation, other interests and reasons for pursuing both degrees all seem be factors, along with grades and MCATs. Also, because the MSP is such a specialized program they have fewer applicants than one might think.

    I would love to talk to people interested in UIUC, or non-traditional programs in general. There's a pretty small group of us, and I think we should stick together ;)
     
  32. sbrandon

    sbrandon Junior Member
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    Forgot one thing...

    The MSP does NOT consider Illinois residency in the admissions process. Out of the 15-or-so MSPers I've met, only 2 are from Illinois, and they both went to UIUC undergrad and had an "in" at a lab.

    Plus, once you've been accepted by the MSP, acceptance to the med school is pretty much a technicality. The adcom at UIUC knows what to look for...
     
  33. imtiaz

    imtiaz i cant translate stupid
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    That's good news, for me at least! :) I know the graduate school at UIUC would accept me. They were actively recruiting people when we visited. If that's all I need to accomplish, then it will be a piece of cake. I was thinking that the medical school side would be the hard part. If the decision of the medical school hinges on the decision of the grad school, then I'm a shoe-in. But I doubt that's true. It's easier to get into graduate school than medical school.
     
  34. Hopkins2010

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    imtiaz,

    I was looking at the MSP application checklist, and they mentioned something about a transmittal notice from AMCAS that your app has been submitted.

    I was just wondering if you are aware of what they are looking for. Have you submitted the AMCAS application yet? Does it let you print out a confirmation that your app has been certified/submitted? I havent submitted mine yet, although I plan to by the end of this weekend (it will probably require staying up all night tomorrow just to get through all the web traffic and errors).
     
  35. Hopkins2010

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    sbrandon,

    Thanks for your supportive post. I wanted to ask you about something.

    Does an applicant need to know precisely what they want to research before they get into the program? I know which fields I am interested in, but I dont have any definite ideas about what specific projects I want to work on. Will that place me at a disadvantage for MD/PhD?

    Also, how do you like the funding situation at UIUC? I wouldnt mind being a TA and actually like teaching. But do they usually provide you with enough opportunities to financially support yourself or is it a real struggle?
     
  36. sbrandon

    sbrandon Junior Member
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    Imtiaz,

    I seem to have given you the wrong impression - sorry. The MSP at UIUC has an adcom of their own that decides who they accept to the program. This includes (I believe) people from graduate departments and people from the med school at the UIUC campus. What I meant was that the MSP adcom looks at your qualifications for the MD and the PhD - and whether you need both. The separate [email protected] med school acceptance seems to be more-or-less a formality. Thus they most definitely DO look at you for the MD once the grad department is interested. If the grad department isn't interested they won't even consider you. They are in the unique position that if they don't want you for both degrees then they won't accept you for just the MD - which adcoms at other schools might do!

    Baylor21,

    Just FYI - AMCAS sends you a transmittal notice in the mail once they've processed your application and have sent it out the the schools you requested. I remember someone at UIUC telling me that many people either forget to or just don't include this in their app at all. I am not sure that this part of the app is totally essential, or maybe you could send it in after the rest of the app if necessary!

    Like in the rest of this process, it's good to be applying early on. But keep in mind that some grad departments won't even look at your app until they have most of the other PhD apps for the year in. This could mean that your app is sitting in the "in-box" until fall, or even winter. So, if you are waiting on the AMCAS transmittal notice until August or so it shouldn't be a big deal!

    In my experience I did NOT need to have (which is good, 'cause I didn't) specific research projects in mind. I told them that I was interested in our national healthcare delivery systems (or lack of one) and comparative systems in other industrialized nations. Other people have come into the program with a research project in mind from their master's thesis, etc. I had an idea of what I wanted to study and why - but not much more...

    In fact, they suggested that I apply to as many departments as possible (up to 3) that fit with my interests to increase my chances of receiving admission to the MSP. Please note though, that I was NOT applying to basic science or engineering departments.

    Most of the people I've talked to have not had difficulty with funding. Some areas are either very well funded at UIUC or across the country, and many students receive grant money or have flexible research assistantships for some of their time at UIUC. Since you don't mind TAing for a while funding shouldn't be a problem while studying for the PhD. This does seem to vary with your department, but the funding always seems to work out, and fairly easily for most people :). I am a little unsure of how funding works while in the med school portion. Some people work as a TA for med classes, others still TA in their home grad department, some continue their research assistantships during med classes, and still more find other avenues like resident assistantships (in a dorm, etc.). They also have a "just in case" reserve pot of money from what I understand.

    For me, the MSP was just about the only way to get the training I wanted in national healthcare policy. I was NOT willing to take out loans for med school and then try to do research or a PhD also. I wanted more than an MD/MPH and think research experience will be invaluable. I think, and hope, that the occasional funding worry will be greatly overshadowed by studying what I truly am interested in.

    Again, best of luck. Keep the questions coming....
     
  37. imtiaz

    imtiaz i cant translate stupid
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    This is directly from the coordinator of the MSP: Mike Trame ([email protected]).


    Subject:
    Re: FW: Hello again
    Date: Fri, 29 Jun 2001 08:33:59 -0500
    From: Mike Trame <[email protected]>
    To:


    Hi,

    No that is not true. All of the decisions are made independently. So it is possible to be accepted into any one of the programs.

    Mike


    At 08:08 AM 6/29/2001 -0500, you wrote:



    -----Original Message-----
    From: Imtiaz
    To: [email protected]
    Sent: 6/28/2001
    Subject: Hello again

    Dear Mike,

    I have another question about the MSP. Is it true that once I initiate
    an
    MSP application that I will only be accepted as an MSP student or not at
    all
    (ie. no consideration for MD alone or PhD alone.)? Just something that I
    was
    thinking about. Ideally, I'd like to be considered for admission into
    the
    college of medicine as a regular MD candidate if I'm not accepted into
    the
    MSP. Is this how it works or is it all or nothing?

    Thanks

    ____________________________

    University of Illinois - Chicago
    Department of Chemistry
    ____________________________________________

    Just clarifying things for everyone.
     
  38. sbrandon

    sbrandon Junior Member
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    Glad you've gotten in touch with Mike. He is a great guy. All the people in the MSP Administrative Office are very forthright and helpful.

    Admissions to the MSP and the [email protected] med school are totally different. The MSP looks at both grad and med qualifications. They will only accept you (to the MSP) if they want you for both. IF this happens you can be pretty much assured that the [email protected] med school will cooperate.

    They still look at you for ONLY med school at [email protected] totally separately regardless of what happens (reject/admit...) at UIUC.
    The only thing is that if you choose to interview at UIUC then your interview scores, etc. are sent to [email protected] for the med school admissions decision (even if the MSP rejects you). Maybe you can interview at both places - but that usually doesn't happen. So the MSP interviews really count!!

    Sorry for any confusion. Seriously - you don't have to worry about this stuff. They really do all of it for you as long as you send in apps to both [email protected] and the MSP at UIUC. Just apply, work on the personal statment for the MSP and practice for those interviews!! It seems like they do a lot of screening before they even offer interviews, so I tried to send in the best app possible. They quoted directly from my personal statement - so work on it - and know it cold! :)

    Good luck to you both - and congrats on getting your app finished baylor21. I didn't think it could get much worse - last year they refused to admit that they'd received a transcript of mine - but they had a mysterious transcript on record for me from a school that I didn't go to! ARGH. It took almost a month to work out. And that was BEFORE the online app craziness.
    Good luck - and keep on top of AMCAS!
     
  39. Hopkins2010

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    I have the application to the graduate program that came with the standard MSP booklet.

    But Mike (in an email to me) mentioned something about using an online application to the MSP program. I emailed him back about it because up until then I wasnt aware there was an online app for the MSP. He stated that it is not online yet, but will be in a month or so.

    So I guess I send in the paper graduate school application and then fill out a separate online app for the MSP?

    I will let you know when he emails me back.
     
  40. imtiaz

    imtiaz i cant translate stupid
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    Yes. There is an online application to the MSP. Go to the graduate college application website. Initiate a graduate college application. Within the graduate college application is an option for MSP. That's how you do it.

    Good luck.
     
  41. Hopkins2010

    Hopkins2010 Membership Revoked
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    imtiaz,

    Have you already filled out the graduate application? I tried to access the online version but when I initiated it, it stated that the program was no longer accepting applications, even though I was applying for Fall 2002.

    I guess they havent updated their database from last year's application cycle, which would make sense if it was telling me that it was too late to apply.

    Did you run into the same problem?
     
  42. imtiaz

    imtiaz i cant translate stupid
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    No that's not it. NOBODY has completed their 2002 application for graduate school. They haven't started accepting them yet. Just sit tight, and soon they will enable 2002 applications. I haven't filled mine out yet. I haven't even submitted my AMCAS yet. I'm waiting another 2 weeks to polish up my essays. Not to mention have a chat with my premed advisor and find out if there's any record of how many students have applied to medical school from my univeristy, where/if they got in, etc etc. You know, the "big book".

     

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