MD vs DO????

Discussion in 'Pre-Medical - MD' started by jayalhugh, Oct 30, 2001.

  1. jayalhugh

    jayalhugh New Member

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    Peace everybody.

    I've recently began considering the pursuit of a DO degree. I understand that DO's take the same licensing exam and share for the most part identical practing rights as MDs. My question is, in what ways might a DO degree be limiting in comparison to an MD? In the same respect, how might MD's suffer from not having undergone osteopathic training? What are some of the disadvantages of taking the DO path to practicing medicine? Thanks everyone, be blessed.

    peace,
    jayalhugh
     
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  3. md2be06

    md2be06 Senior Member

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    I'll move this over to the TPR Board for you. I'm sure the helpful folks over there would be glad to engage in a thoughtful discourse on the differences between and MD and a DO.
     
  4. The Fly

    The Fly Senior Member

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    I think DOs take an analogous licensing exam, but I am pretty sure it isn't the USMLE but rather something called COMLEX, or some such.

    By and large DOs *DO* have the same practicing rights as MDs do. However, it is much harder for them to specialize, i.e. there are precious few DOs serving as surgeons and dermatologists, for example. Another disadvantage is that depending on what part of the country you're in, some people have never heard of a DO. Indeed, I had never even encountered one until I went to college in Maine where they are more prevalent. Just a couple of things to think about.
     
  5. nezlab99

    nezlab99 Senior Member

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    Most Osteopathic schools require the COMLEX and the USMLE. DO's are supposed to have a much more holistic approach to studying and practicing medicine, which I think is great. The downfall is that the schools aren't as competitive as the allopathic schools. Regardless of how well a Osteopathic degree sounds in theory, it isn't as widely respected as a allopathic degree. If you want to go into Family Practice, the DO degree is a great idea; they are very prevalent and do well there . If you plan on specializing in surgery or something like that, an MD is more popular.
     

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