180910

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Is there any way that I can alert Wayne State about the family alumni, without coming off opportunistic? They don't have a spot in the application to fill this info out, unlike most other secondaries. I feel like having family alumni should be an asset to me (as it is for other applicants at other schools), especially b/c I'm an OOS applicant. Would it be improper to include the alumni information in response to this question:

.Write a brief autobiography which provides a picture of yourself, your family, and events you consider important to you. Identify the values that are of the greatest importance to you. If you have completed your undergraduate education, please describe what you have done or have been doing since graduation..


Is there any real advantage in having alumni in your family, in terms of at least getting an interview?

Thanks.
 

urrugby

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Having a family member who is an alum of a school can work in your favor, but only if he or she is an active alum. Unlike undergrad, it isn't very common for medical school alumns to just cold-call their admissions offices to discuss an applicant. In fact, some admissions offices react poorly to external pressures.

That being said, noting a family tie to the school in your secondary can work out well. However, make sure it seems like a natural thing to say in the essay.
 
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180910

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By active you mean what? Should I have my dad and uncle's join the alumni assoc?

How can I work that info into the essay so that it sounds natural? Any ideas?
 

Naijaba

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You've raised another question that I wanted answered. Columbia's secondary asks if your parents are alumni. I assumed this was to the applicant's benefit, but the next question was whether or not either of your parents are physicians. I wonder if adcomms view it as a positive or a negative to have parent doctors?
 

bashir

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I would mention it only if you can use the information to convey that you have strong ties to the area. Or you could just say you have strong ties to the area, if you can demonstrate that without mentioning your alumni relatives.
 

BerlinDude

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It's ridiculous. It's like the Adcoms are filled with idiots who think that being in the general vicinity of MDs makes you prepared to be a doctor.

I have a pet cat, that doesn't mean I can climb trees and catch mice.
 

redlight

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It's ridiculous. It's like the Adcoms are filled with idiots who think that being in the general vicinity of MDs makes you prepared to be a doctor.

I have a pet cat, that doesn't mean I can climb trees and catch mice.
your cat comment would be analogous to: my parents are surgeons, that doesnt mean i could give you a liver transplant...

but having md parents could make you more aware of how demanding the profession is and how that affects things like family and friends. i'm sure there are other advantages depending on how involved your parents let you get in their work/career.

op: there was a similar thread from maybe last week. connections may get you a courtesy interview but thats about it unless you are married to the dean or your family gives tons of cash *donations* or something.
 
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180910

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your cat comment would be analogous to: my parents are surgeons, that doesnt mean i could give you a liver transplant...

but having md parents could make you more aware of how demanding the profession is and how that affects things like family and friends. i'm sure there are other advantages depending on how involved your parents let you get in their work/career.

op: there was a similar thread from maybe last week. connections may get you a courtesy interview but thats about it unless you are married to the dean or your family gives tons of cash *donations* or something.
Well, I was hoping for a courtesy interview. I'm confident that I can secure a spot if I get a chance to sell myself at an interview. I also agree with your comment regarding having docs in your family. The cat comment was a bit extreme. I have seen my father care for his patients, seen the emotional toll that this life has on him and his family. I have woken him up in the middle-of-the-night to alert him to a call that sent him for bound for the hospital. I have worked in his office, treated his patients, seen the impact that his care has had on their lives. All of these experiences inform a person to become a more aware physician. That isn't to say that anyone who is diligent can't get similar experiences, but I feel that too few premeds understand the kind of sacrifice that they will be making in certain fields. The emotional toll is not something that can be foreseen, it has to be lived in my opinion. I don't begrudge anyone without these insights, however I think that being witness to the life of a doc, gives me a leg up on the mental aspect of a physicians life.
 

BerlinDude

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your cat comment would be analogous to: my parents are surgeons, that doesnt mean i could give you a liver transplant...

but having md parents could make you more aware of how demanding the profession is and how that affects things like family and friends. i'm sure there are other advantages depending on how involved your parents let you get in their work/career.

op: there was a similar thread from maybe last week. connections may get you a courtesy interview but thats about it unless you are married to the dean or your family gives tons of cash *donations* or something.
There's no one in this country who hasn't heard doctors whine about how hard they work and how tough it is and how bad they've got it. But I'm speaking even more general than just having MD parents. They also care about hospital volunteer work for example, even though all your time is spent just making beds or stapling papers or moving boxes.

Anyway, don't mind me, I'm just annoyed at all these hoops the AdComs make you jump through.
 
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180910

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There's no one in this country who hasn't heard doctors whine about how hard they work and how tough it is and how bad they've got it. But I'm speaking even more general than just having MD parents. They also care about hospital volunteer work for example, even though all your time is spent just making beds or stapling papers or moving boxes.

Anyway, don't mind me, I'm just annoyed at all these hoops the AdComs make you jump through.
Well we can certainly agree on that point. I spoke to several docs, and none of them had to have the extensive amount of clinical or research experience that is expected of us now.

Recognizing that having MD parents didn't amount to more than a cursory understanding of things, I opted for a phlebotomy license and have worked the last 2 years in two doctors offices, attending to patients. Hopefully that, along with my other work activities, will be enough for an interview.
 

BerlinDude

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Well we can certainly agree on that point. I spoke to several docs, and none of them had to have the extensive amount of clinical or research experience that is expected of us now.

Recognizing that having MD parents didn't amount to more than a cursory understanding of things, I opted for a phlebotomy license and have worked the last 2 years in two doctors offices, attending to patients. Hopefully that, along with my other work activities, will be enough for an interview.
I think you'll be fine. It sounds like you have had pretty extensive interaction with patients and that will help you more than anything. Good luck.
 

QofQuimica

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Is there any real advantage in having alumni in your family, in terms of at least getting an interview?
At my school, it sometimes gets you a courtesy interview. Courtesy interviews are just that: they're given to people who may or may not deserve them, based on their connections. However, if you are obviously unqualified, the adcom will quickly dispense with your app at the next meeting. This situation is fortunately not as common as people might think. I've only seen it happen a couple of times in the past two years. Neither applicant was accepted.

It's ridiculous. It's like the Adcoms are filled with idiots who think that being in the general vicinity of MDs makes you prepared to be a doctor.
No, my friend, it's about politics. The repercussions of denying Mortimer Abernathy Bigshot III, son of Department Chairman Bigshot, his interview would be unpleasant for the school administration. Rest assured, however, that most on the adcom greatly dislike this necessity. See my above response.
 

MegaProjectile

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Is there any way that I can alert Wayne State about the family alumni, without coming off opportunistic? They don't have a spot in the application to fill this info out, unlike most other secondaries. I feel like having family alumni should be an asset to me (as it is for other applicants at other schools), especially b/c I'm an OOS applicant. Would it be improper to include the alumni information in response to this question:

.Write a brief autobiography which provides a picture of yourself, your family, and events you consider important to you. Identify the values that are of the greatest importance to you. If you have completed your undergraduate education, please describe what you have done or have been doing since graduation..


Is there any real advantage in having alumni in your family, in terms of at least getting an interview?

Thanks.
I know Columbia gives a courtesy interview to children of alums. Not sure if they do it anymore. It helps if you're a borderline applicant and can ace the interview. If you're under-qualified, you'll be receiving a sweet letter in the mail soon after.
 

BerlinDude

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No, my friend, it's about politics. The repercussions of denying Mortimer Abernathy Bigshot III, son of Department Chairman Bigshot, his interview would be unpleasant for the school administration. Rest assured, however, that most on the adcom greatly dislike this necessity. See my above response.[/QUOTE]

I only wish it were so. I know that Dept Bigshot's kid got into med school where he's at, and man, this kid was so unqualified it was ridiculous. This kid was maybe five standard deviations below average on one of the tests.
 
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180910

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At my school, it sometimes gets you a courtesy interview. Courtesy interviews are just that: they're given to people who may or may not deserve them, based on their connections. However, if you are obviously unqualified, the adcom will quickly dispense with your app at the next meeting. This situation is fortunately not as common as people might think. I've only seen it happen a couple of times in the past two years. Neither applicant was accepted.


No, my friend, it's about politics. The repercussions of denying Mortimer Abernathy Bigshot III, son of Department Chairman Bigshot, his interview would be unpleasant for the school administration. Rest assured, however, that most on the adcom greatly dislike this necessity. See my above response.
I don't expect to get an interview b/c of the alumni status. I expected to be interviewed and accepted because of my academic performance and my extensive clinical experience. Hopefully if granted an interview, I can demonstrate my commitment to medicine. I wouldn't want to get in on anything other than my own merits.