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Does it really matter which med school you graduate from? Im a NJ resident and so i hope to go to a NJMS or RWJMS because they're in NJ and it would be more efficient (travel wise and tuition wise) to stay in-state. I dont think the medical schools in NJ are highly ranked (they're prob not even top 50) but would going to a medical school in NJ over a medical school ranked in the top 50 have much of an impact when it comes to matching and job opportunities. What are some benefits of attending higher ranked medical schools other than just for the prestige?
 

LizzyM

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What you do is more important than where you do it. It may be easier to be involved in some activities at some schools than others but that's what the summer after first year and the away rotations are for. (you can get some experiences at another institution if not available "at home"). Many people prioritize cost and location and that is a very reasonable choice to make.
 
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gonnif

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Does it really matter which med school you graduate from? Im a NJ resident and so i hope to go to a NJMS or RWJMS because they're in NJ and it would be more efficient (travel wise and tuition wise) to stay in-state. I dont think the medical schools in NJ are highly ranked (they're prob not even top 50) but would going to a medical school in NJ over a medical school ranked in the top 50 have much of an impact when it comes to matching and job opportunities. What are some benefits of attending higher ranked medical schools other than just for the prestige?
For most applicants it is an entirely moot question
60% of applicants get no acceptance
20% get a single acceptance

It is much more important to target schools that you actually gain acceptance to and not get caught up in which schools to apply to based on a perceived reputation
 
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EdgeTrimmer

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If you can afford and have stats and ECs aim high. If not go in-state and there is always residency and fellowship if you are chasing prestige and they don't cost you anything.
 
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gonnif

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If you can afford and have stats and ECs aim high. If not go in-state and there is always residency and fellowship if you are chasing prestige and they don't cost you anything.
Lets clarify this. You target schools where you fit their profile in terms of GPA, MCAT, EC, and mission. If these metrics make it appropriate to apply to “prestigious” schools then you do so in well balanced school list. It does cost you in terms of application fees, resources/energy in filling out applications, and most of all, in chances if you have an overly “prestige-heavy” school list where competitiveness for seats is higher than at most schools. Prospective physicians must always remember actions will have impacts, both positive and negative, and dismissing something as having no cost is rarely. Risk, both the probability of the risk and the impact of the risk, should always be considered
 
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